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A House Divided: March 6, 2011 - March 12, 2011

Tweeting the Civil War: Rumors of an imminent invasion begin to circulate in Charleston and Montgomery

The Washington Post is tweeting the Civil War, in the words of the people who lived it -- from journals, letters, official records and newspapers of the day. Follow us. Twitter recap from week one: Showdown in Charleston Week two:...

By Mary Hadar  | March 11, 2011; 3:31 PM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)
Categories:  150th anniversary, News, Tweeting the war  
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Disunion lobbyists important to secession movement

The last of the states to secede from the Union were lobbied by a small army of men who spread out across the upper South to preach the sermon of disunion to all who would listen. They came from those...

By Linda Wheeler  | March 10, 2011; 4:43 PM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)
Categories:  150th anniversary, News  
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Edna Greene Medford: How influential was Abraham Lincoln's inaugural speech in keeping the border states in the Union?

Those states still contemplating secession remained suspicious of this new president who had been elected on a platform championing slavery’s non-expansion. But the Unionists among them heard enough to encourage them to continue their efforts to slow the rush toward secession. ...

By Edna Greene Medford  | March 7, 2011; 11:01 AM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (1)
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Harold Holzer: How influential was Abraham Lincoln's inaugural speech in keeping the border states in the Union?

So if Lincoln’s conciliatory address did indeed prevent the Upper South states of Virginia, Tennessee, and North Carolina from quitting the Union earlier, its effect was, at best, only temporary. ...

By Harold Holzer  | March 7, 2011; 10:55 AM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (1)
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Frank Williams: How influential was Abraham Lincoln's inaugural speech in keeping the border states in the Union?

President Lincoln’s First Inaugural only confirmed what he and the Republican Party had been saying all along – they would not interfere with slavery where it all ready existed – and this included the border states of Missouri, Kentucky, Maryland and Delaware. But many in those and other slave-holding states either did not believe or did not want to believe the President’s commitment. ...

By Frank Williams  | March 7, 2011; 10:52 AM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)
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Dennis Frye: How influential was Abraham Lincoln's inaugural speech in keeping the border states in the Union?

The words repeated ad infinitum by today's textbooks from Lincoln's first inaugural address are "mystic chords of memory" and "better angels of our nature." These words did not resonate or reverberate or inspire anyone in the border states in 1861. The most important words Lincoln uttered or inferred were slavery, secession, separation, succession, and suppression. ...

By Dennis Frye  | March 7, 2011; 10:39 AM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)
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