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Geography of Distress

I want to direct you to a valuable package of work produced by a team of writers and editors at the Post. They've produced an interactive map of residential foreclosures by Zip code from January 2007 to June 2009 for the Washington metro area. Hardest hit, they say, is Woodbridge's 20111 Zip code, which had 3,041 homes lost. And more foreclosures are expected, Post reporters Dina ElBoghdady and Renae Merle report in the accompanying article.

By Elizabeth Razzi  |  July 30, 2009; 3:15 PM ET
Categories:  Foreclosure , Neighborhoods , Statistics , The economy , The market  
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Comments

This is a great resource...Thank you.

I agree with the article and believe also that the worse is hardly over. It took 7 years to create this mess, it won't resolve in 1 year and on top of that, unemployment is rising and housing in this area is still extremely over valued and not affordable for most people minus the select few.

When the commercial market time bomb hits (as it is now), we will continue to see worse price corrections. Note I said corrections, not depreciation, because the NOVA/DC area is over-valued still.

Posted by: cavatellie | July 30, 2009 10:48 PM | Report abuse

This map, although interesting, should display foreclosure RATES, not simply the raw number of foreclosures. This map gives no indication of how many homes are in each Zip code, so you can't tell if the number of foreclosures is relatively good or bad. 3000 foreclosures in Woodbridge, fine - but compared to how many homes/mortgages/people in Woodbridge? And how does that RATE compare to other zip codes.

Posted by: jantos2 | July 31, 2009 11:30 AM | Report abuse

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