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Posted at 11:28 AM ET, 02/ 8/2011

Gaithersburg man convicted of fraud

By Washington Post editors

A federal jury in Richmond has convicted a Maryland man of defrauding a technology company by swapping counterfeit products for real equipment.

U.S. Attorney Neil MacBride says 39-year-old Iheanyi Frank Chinasa of Gaithersburg was convicted Monday of conspiracy, obstruction, wire fraud and eight counts of mail fraud.

Chinasa faces up to 220 years when he is sentenced May 5.

Prosecutors said Chinasa manufactured counterfeit computer and telecommunications equipment. He or a co-defendant, 31-year-old Robert Kendrick Chambliss of Henrico County, would contact Cisco Systems Inc. and say they were having trouble with a Cisco product. Cisco would issue replacement parts in exchange for the knockoffs.

Chambliss previously pleaded guilty to conspiracy and faces up to 20 years at sentencing April 13.

By Washington Post editors  | February 8, 2011; 11:28 AM ET
Categories:  Crime and Public Safety, Maryland  
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