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Posted at 8:48 PM ET, 09/ 7/2010

Bicyclist struck on 14th Street NW

By Erica Johnston

A bicyclist collided with a car Tuesday evening in Northwest Washington and was taken to a hospital with injuries believed to be non-life threatening, D.C. police said.

Authorities were called to the 1900 block of 14th Street about 6:30 p.m., where they found the 24-year-old, said Officer Paul Metcalf, a spokesman. He was taken to a hospital with injuries that were not believed to be life threatening.

-- Clarence Williams

By Erica Johnston  | September 7, 2010; 8:48 PM ET
Categories:  Crime and Public Safety, DC  
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Comments

It is not safe for bikes on these bike path roads, these bikes are not riding smart. Where are there helmets?

Posted by: drfields | September 7, 2010 10:15 PM | Report abuse

It is not safe for bikes on these bike path roads, these bikes are not riding smart. Where are there helmets?

Posted by: drfields | September 7, 2010 10:15 PM | Report abuse

living in dc for almost 30 years and seeing many more people ride bikes...some folks just don't get it. they think they are being "hip" by not wearing helmets and riding their fixed gear bikes-swerving through traffic- without regard for themselves or for others.
working in a hospital i see them come in all of the time...hit by a car AND no helmet. i guess they don't mind the head injuries, cost, emotional trauma or the time in the hospital...
Wear a helmet.

Posted by: mrdcnews | September 8, 2010 5:49 AM | Report abuse

Where did you read that he wasn't wearing a helmet? Wow - that's presumptuous.

I'm impressed more and more people are biking to work versus driving. Its fantastic.

Cars need to be better.

Signed, a driver.

Posted by: baisasa | September 8, 2010 6:11 AM | Report abuse

I am with baisasa- it doesn't say anything about the cyclist wearing a helmet? How do we know it wasn't the driver's fault? I would say, if anything it was the driver doing something stupid like texting or talking while driving. I cycle to work every day, and have done so for the past 15 years in DC and can say with certainty that most, if not ALL my close calls were with distracted drivers.

Posted by: chaddsford1971 | September 8, 2010 9:26 AM | Report abuse

Its both sides, bit I will say as a driver bike riders in this city (not all) complain about the drivers not giving respect, but the bikers don't stop at stop signs, red lights, or yields. You cant command the same respect as a car when you behave like a pedestrian.

Posted by: cnewso01 | September 8, 2010 9:55 AM | Report abuse

my comment was about some people- the "hip" ones- the people who don't wear helmets and then they run red lights, cut off pedestrians in the cross walk....then complain when they have thousand dollar bill from the er.
sure there are bad drivers but come on...use your head. Wear a Helmet

Posted by: mrdcnews | September 8, 2010 9:56 AM | Report abuse

Nothing about a helmet, and even so, all you helmet advocates might want to do a little critical thinking:

http://www.thewashcycle.com/2010/05/the-helmet-facts.html

Posted by: akablueeyeddevil | September 8, 2010 10:00 AM | Report abuse

Nothing mentioned about a helmet. All the helmet advocates here might want to do a little critical reading:

http://www.thewashcycle.com/2010/05/the-helmet-facts.html

Just sayin'...

Posted by: akablueeyeddevil | September 8, 2010 10:02 AM | Report abuse

And I love the comment from cnewso01 about commanding the respect of a car when you're a pedestrian...why should a car command more respect than a pedestrian? We are ALL pedestrians; not all of us are motorists.

Posted by: akablueeyeddevil | September 8, 2010 10:05 AM | Report abuse

We are all pedestrians. It's not a matter of commanding respect. It's a matter of the law. Regardless of what peds and bikes are doing it doesn't give a driver the right to throw the law out the window or start driving like a jerk. Get a hold of you emotions, put the blackberry away and hang up and drive.

And on topic, did the driver leave the scene of the collision? They only mention the cyclist being on the scene.

Posted by: DadRyan | September 8, 2010 10:36 AM | Report abuse

Further Questions for Erica Johnston:

1) was it a collision between a bike and a moving vehicle or a parked vehicle?

2) if there was a driver, was the driver injured?

3) Were any moving violations ticketed - and if so, for driver, biker or both? If not, why not?

4) As the 1900 block of 14th St NW has a bike lane, can you report where in the street the collision occured - was it in the bike lane, in the center of the strip, crossing 14th on T - anything?

Thanks.

Posted by: Greent | September 8, 2010 10:39 AM | Report abuse

Not all drivers text and talk on the phone while driving. Not ALL bikers are safe and courteous bikers! I have observed many bikers riding into intersections with cars coming. Not to mention the rudeness when cars are trying to park. When was the last time you saw someone pick a car up and place it in a parking space?

Posted by: rmbncts | September 8, 2010 11:29 AM | Report abuse

I use that bike lane almost every morning, and the greatest danger to a bike rider isn't cardrivers, so to speak. The two most dangerous things:

1) buses. the 50 buses stop every other block and they don't get all the way to the curb, so bikers behind them have to swing out into traffic lanes; and

2) illegally parked cars. It is a rare morning where there aren't cars stopped in the bike lane on 14th between U & T. Mostly because of the McDonalds there. Many mornings the same MPD car is stopped in the bike lane immediately after the 14/U intersection for a McDonalds run...

Posted by: merinfrank | September 8, 2010 11:44 AM | Report abuse

As someone who got struck by a car on Columbia Pike (next to the Navy Annex) and flung across all 4 lanes, I can attest to the benefit of wearing a helmet.

All I had was a sore tailbone, scrapes, and a busted front wheel. The back of my helmet looked like an egg that had been dropped from a kitchen counter. Without it I probably would have had to learn how to walk again.

So, do the right thing. Wear a helmet.

Oh, and have fun weaving in and out of cars.

Posted by: Methos_ | September 8, 2010 12:38 PM | Report abuse

As someone who got locked up with a car at Logan Circle that ran a red light and never stopped after I hit the ground, needing 23 stitches on my forehead and was out of work for a week with a serious concussion I was wearing a helmet), I have zero sympathy for driver's always b!tching about biker's being at fault. You are in a giant, heavy object, protected by walls and a roof, with a powerful engine so there is no need to get aggressive with a person riding a bike. It happens to me daily. If you are stuck in traffic and I pass you, there is no reason to speed up and try to overtake me when you know darn well you're going to have to slow down in 20 feet because you're in traffic. It's not my fault that you choose to commute via car so don't take your frustrations out on me. I'm a driver too, btw, and I always am aware of my surroundings.

Posted by: mbm1 | September 8, 2010 1:24 PM | Report abuse

Americans, for the most part, are fat lazy slobs. Simply put, Americans are fat and getting fatter everyday.

See the latest CDC statistics regarding obesity in the U.S.

http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/

As an American I find the statistics pretty embarrassing!

USA! USA! USA!

It seems to me we should encourage more bike commuting to reduce pollution, traffic, and obesity rates.

And I agree nowhere in the article did it say the cyclist was NOT wearing a helmet.

C'mon America! Get your fat lazy butts out of the car and ride a bike!

Posted by: montana123 | September 8, 2010 1:29 PM | Report abuse

Since no one else has done so, I'd like to express a fervent wish that the cyclist will be fine. Non-life threatening could still be bad.

As a regular bicycle commuter, I'd like to tell my fellow cyclist who seem to labor under the delusion that the traffic laws do not apply to them, to cut it out. It's obnoxious. As someone who also drives to work regularly, I'd like to tell my fellow drivers that for every cyclist I see breaking the law, I see about twenty drivers doing it too. Unless, of course, you think that speeding is a traffic law that does not apply to drivers, in which case you can stop complaining about cyclists.

Posted by: krickey7 | September 8, 2010 1:40 PM | Report abuse

@Krickey7. Thanks for being so logical. I too hope that the cyclist will be OK and that both motorists and cyclists will learn to obey the law.

We will see more and more cyclists on the roads and I think that is a good thing. But it means we all need to share responsiblity for safety. Drivers need to get off their phones and stop texting and obey the speed and other traffic laws and cyclists need to wear helmets and obey traffic laws. If everyone does that things may just work out fine.

Posted by: peterdc | September 8, 2010 1:46 PM | Report abuse

@mbm1,

"I have zero sympathy for driver's always b!tching about biker's being at fault."

I alternatively drive and bike to work. I've seen dumb and dangerous things from both sides. But, this sense of "zero sympathy" is exactly the problem. Bike riders seem to have little care if they are blocking other traffic with their slower speed, and drivers seem to get bent out of shape when a bike is in front of them. Maybe if bikers and drivers had mutual sympathy on the roads instead of viewing it as a time to engage in mortal combat, then we would have less accidents.

Posted by: oldtimehockey | September 8, 2010 2:03 PM | Report abuse

Do cyclist adhere to vehicle rules or pedestrian rules? A lot of cyclist don't stop at red lights or stop signs, manuever in and out of traffic while avoiding the bike lanes and don't stop for pedestrians in the crosswalk. They seem to want to have the best of both worlds - pedestrians rules when it benefits them and vehicle rules when it benefits them. I'm sure there are cyclist rules - but very few seem to adhere to them.

Posted by: SPUD2 | September 8, 2010 2:15 PM | Report abuse

@SPUD2:
Do drivers adhere to laws? I bike, walk and drive. I see every single one of these forms break the laws.

Peds jaywalk, cross against the light, in the middle of the street, and think they do not have to stop for redlights.

Bikers do not stop for pedestrians in xwalks, lights or signs, and do not signal their turns. Bikers who bike on sidewalks (who r not kids).

Drivers speed, speed, speed, veer into bike lanes, illegally turn, roll through red lights (FULL STOP), stop IN the crosswalk, use phones/devices/eat/apply make-up while driving.

Pedestrians, bikes, cars. What do each of these have in common? Humans. SHARE the roads.

For every cyclist that does not obey the rules there are 5 drivers that do not obey the rules. Guess which ones kill more people?

I support more giving tickets for all road infractions. Get 'em DC popo. Get 'em all.

Posted by: Greent | September 8, 2010 3:26 PM | Report abuse

I ride mostly in VA but I will say that I follow most of the rules but the real problem is that drivers do not understand the laws as they pertain to cyclists. I have been brushed off the road most than once. VA law says that drivers must give three feet clearance when passing a bike. I do go to the front of a line of cars at a light because I want everyone to see me when the light changes. And I prefer to go the the front of a line of cars when making a left hand turn because it is safer for me. The bike paths here are dangerous for someone riding a high speed road bike. I average over 20 MPH for the 40 miles or so I ride everyday and because most bike paths are ten feet of so from intersections the drives are not looking for cyclists and I am normally going over 25MPH if the road is somewhat flat there is no way I am going to stop at each intersection. So I agree it is both that are at fault but in the end it is the motorist that has the obligation to control their cars because they have thousands of pounds that can be a weapon. And cyclist just need to obey the laws and watch out for the many stupid drivers out there.

Posted by: tim237 | September 8, 2010 4:06 PM | Report abuse

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