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Posted at 4:42 PM ET, 09/16/2010

Hopkins shooter used alias, lived in Va.

By Washington Post editors

hopkins.jpg
(Photo: Associated Press)


UPDATED:
Baltimore police have now tentatively identified a man who shot a doctor at Johns Hopkins Hospital as 50-year-old Paul Warren Pardus of Arlington.

Police say Pardus apparently used an alias. They say hospital officials knew him as Warren Davis. Police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi says detectives are awaiting fingerprint analysis from the FBI to confirm his identity.

Police say his mother's name is still believed to be Jean Davis.

According to police, Pardus became distraught as a doctor briefed on his mother's condition. Pardus shot the doctor, then shot and killed his mother and himself in her hospital room. The doctor was shot in the abdomen but is expected to survive.

Pardus has a handgun permit in Virginia.

-- Associated Press

Hopkins shooter, mother identified
4:20 p.m.

Baltimore police say a man became distraught as a doctor briefed him on his mother's condition at Johns Hopkins Hospital and shot the doctor, then shot and killed his mother and himself in her hospital room.

The doctor was shot in the abdomen but is expected to survive.

Police and hospital officials have not released his name, but two Hopkins employees say he is David B. Cohen, an assistant professor and orthopedic surgeon. The employees asked to remain anonymous because they are not authorized to discuss the matter.

Police Commissioner Frederick Bealefeld identified the shooter as 50-year-old Warren Davis and his mother as Jean Davis.

-- Associated Press


Hopkins gunman shot self, relative
This post has been updated, 2:25 p.m. and corrected.

A gunman who wounded a doctor at Johns Hopkins hospital in Baltimore and then holed up inside a room has shot and killed himself and a relative during a standoff with authorities, police said told the Associated Press Thursday. The Baltimore Sun reports that the relative was the suspected gunman's mother.

Police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi told The Associated Press that the suspect and his relative died in a hospital room.

The standoff lasted more than 2 hours.

Guglielmi said earlier that he did not know the relationship between the gunman — described as a man in his 30s — and the doctor. The hospital said in a statement that the doctor is a faculty physician but that it could not release more information because of privacy policies.

The doctor was shot in the stomach but was expected to survive, Guglielmi said.

"The doctor will be OK," Guglielmi said. "He's in the best place in the world — at Johns Hopkins hospital."

Michelle Burrell, who works in a coffee shop in the hospital lobby, said she was told by employees who were on the floor where the doctor was shot that the gunman was angry with the doctor's treatment of his mother.

"Basically, he was upset about his mother being paralyzed by the doctor," Burrell said. "It's crazy."

A small area of the hospital had been locked down before the gunman died, as about a dozen officers wearing vests and helmets and carrying assault weapons prepared to go into the hospital at midday. Guglielmi said the gunman had not taken any hostages, and people with appointments in other parts of the hospital were encouraged to keep them.

The FBI was assisting Baltimore police, said FBI spokesman Richard J. Wolf.

Update, 1:55 p.m.

Baltimore Police have shot and killed the gunman The gunman who allegedly shot and wounded a doctor before barricading himself in a building at John Hopkins Hospital's East Baltimore Campus at around 11:15 a.m. apparently shot himself and a relative, Associated Press reports.

Police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi says the man was shot and killed by officers Thursday afternoon.

The doctor, who was shot in the stomach, was rushed to surgery and is expected to survive.

He said he did not know the relationship between the gunman, described as a man in his 30s, and the doctor. The hospital said in a statement that the doctor is a faculty physician but that it could not release more information because of privacy policies.

Summary of what we know as of 12:50 p.m. Live updates below

Balitmore Police report that they are launching a tactical operation against a man who allegedly shot a doctor at Johns Hopkins Hospital and then barricaded himself in a room on the eighth floor of a building at the sprawling medical complex.

Hospital officials said an emergency alert went out about 11:15 a.m. warning of an emergency situation at Nelson 8, a thoracic center on its East Baltimore campus. The doctor who was shot is in surgery and expected to survive, police said. It is not yet clear what the connection is between the doctor and the alleged gunman.

While some roads are blocks, police said other parts of the medical complex remain open, including the emergency room. Police say they believe they have the gunman isolated in an area on the eighth floor of the thoracic center.

You can follow the Baltimore Police Department's Twitter feed here.

Update, 12:40 p.m.

Baltimore police say the suspect has been contained to a small section of the hospital. Portions of the hospital were evacuated, but the emergency room and other parts of the hospital remain open. The doctor who was shot has been taken into surgery and expected to survive.

Update, 12:35 p.m.

Baltimore police say they're setting up a tactical operation to deal with a gunman who is holed up on the eighth floor of Johns Hopkins hospital after shooting a doctor, Associated Press reports. The doctor is in critical condition, The Baltimore Sun reports.

A spokesman for Johns Hopkins hospital in Baltimore earlier said the gunman had been caught, but police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi says that's not the case.

Guglielmi says some parts of the hospital are being evacuated, but not the entire massive complex in east Baltimore.

With more than 30,000 employees, Johns Hopkins Medicine is among Maryland's largest private employers and the largest in Baltimore. The hospital has more than 1,000 beds and more than 1,700 full-time doctors.

Update, 12:30 p.m.

Associated Press now reports that Baltimore police say the suspect is not in custody.

You can follow the Baltimore Police Department's Twitter feed here.

Update, 12:15 p.m.

The Baltimore Sun reports that the doctor shot by a gunman is in critical condition.

Update, 12:10 p.m.

A suspect in the shooting of a doctor at Johns Hopkins hospital has been subdued and detained.

Hospital spokesman Gary Stephenson says the shooting was on the eighth floor of the main hospital building. He says that floor remains locked down. Earlier, Baltimore police said the hospital was being evacuated.

Police say they do not know the doctor's condition.

-- Associated Press

Update, 12:00 p.m.

The Baltimore Sun is reporting that one person has been shot and a man has taken another person hostage on the eighth floor of Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, according to authorities and correspondence over the police radio.

The Associated Press reported the person shot is a doctor.

The Sun reported that Hopkins sounded an emergency alert about 11:15 a.m. at Nelson 8, a thoracic center on its sprawling East Baltimore campus. Police have shut down numerous roads in the area of Broadway, East Monument and North Wolf streets.

Earlier post.

Baltimore police say a doctor has been shot at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore and a suspect is holed up inside.

A police department spokesman says the hospital is being evacuated.

He said he didn't know the doctor's condition.

-- Associated Press

SHOOTING LOCATION

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By Washington Post editors  | September 16, 2010; 4:42 PM ET
Categories:  Crime and Public Safety, Maryland  
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Comments

"While some roads are blocks, police said other parts of the medical complex remain open, including the emergency room."

I didn't realize that a gunman made the roads in the area turn into blocks. Are the roads small blocks or big blocks? What does the space that used to be a road look like now, is it just dirt with blocks sitting next to it?

Posted by: Chris751 | September 16, 2010 2:01 PM | Report abuse

Well I hope the doctor lives, but how lucky could he have been to have been shot at a hospital and John Hopkins at that?

Posted by: PublicEnemy1 | September 16, 2010 2:44 PM | Report abuse

So, he was upset with care his mom was recieving? Then he shoots her? As the Wicked Witch of the West said: "What a world, what a world".

Posted by: jckdoors | September 16, 2010 2:51 PM | Report abuse

He wasn't merely "upset at the care", he was sent into utter desperation, apparently, because his mother had been turned into a quadriplegic by the doctor's botched surgery.

Are there any witnesses to the shooting other than the doctor? How certain are we that he is the victim, and this isn't a self-inflicted way of getting out of what would have likely been a career-ending malpractice situation?

We really haven't heard much about the botched surgery itself, because the focus of the reporting is 100% on the shooting. I'd say it's a pretty damned important detail that's being left out.

Posted by: james0tucson | September 16, 2010 5:45 PM | Report abuse

"Pardus has a handgun permit in Virginia."

But I thought "guns don't kill people..."

Posted by: ceefer66 | September 16, 2010 7:30 PM | Report abuse

I am gravely disappointed at the media telling the public the name of person injured by a shooter before the victim's family could be notified. This is grossly inconsiderate! Who on the staff at any news outlet would like to find out about their husband or loved one being severely injured or potentially murdered from the media or some random friend who was on the internet as opposed to in a respectful and kind matter. As this story shows - getting bad news can drive people to do horrible things to themselves and others: allegedly the shooter was receiving bad news from a doctor and severely injured the physician, killed himself and his own mother because of receiving disappointing news. This newspaper then has the audacity to deliver bad news in the most insensitive manner. I am ashamed of the Washington Post for stooping to "getting the scoop" at the cost of morality and decency. Even if told this information from a gossip, who knew they shouldn't be saying anything, this should have never been published. The gossips should be fired; they knew they were in the wrong and still did it.

Posted by: taylor361 | September 16, 2010 7:45 PM | Report abuse

I am gravely disappointed at the media telling the public the name of person injured by a shooter before the victim's family could be notified. This is grossly inconsiderate! Who on the staff at any news outlet would like to find out about their husband or loved one being severely injured or potentially murdered from the media or some random friend who was on the internet as opposed to in a respectful and kind matter. As this story shows - getting bad news can drive people to do horrible things to themselves and others: allegedly the shooter was receiving bad news from a doctor and severely injured the physician, killed himself and his own mother because of receiving disappointing news. This newspaper then has the audacity to deliver bad news in the most insensitive manner. I am ashamed of the Washington Post for stooping to "getting the scoop" at the cost of morality and decency. Even if told this information from a gossip, who knew they shouldn't be saying anything, this should have never been published. The gossips should be fired; they knew they were in the wrong and still did it.

Posted by: taylor361 | September 16, 2010 7:46 PM | Report abuse

Why would a NEWSpaper publish "news" from somebody who works 8 floors away from where the events happened at? She was not involved, and definitely not in the loop. Rumors and gossip are far from fact. Based on the sources of this article, it is not truthfully known if this physician is even directly connected to her surgery - or even if she had surgery. By publishing gossip, this newspaper has potentially committed libel. Asking a coffee shop worker for specific details of what happened 8 floors away in a hospital is the equivalent of asking a doorman at a corporate office what the strategic business plan and secret upcoming products are. Simply ludicrous!

Posted by: taylor361 | September 16, 2010 7:57 PM | Report abuse

I'M GLAD HE WASN'T MY SON. I HAVE A CRIPPLING DISEASE BUT I WANT TO LIVE.

Posted by: skinfreak | September 16, 2010 8:59 PM | Report abuse

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