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Posted at 1:06 PM ET, 03/ 8/2011

More speed cameras in Howard Co.?

By Washington Post editors

Howard County's chief executive and top law enforcement official announced Tuesday that they plan to introduce legislation that would call for the installation of mobile speed cameras in school zones.

“Speeding in neighborhoods is the most frequent complaint we hear from citizens,” said Howard County Police Chief William McMahon, who made the announcement along with County Executive Ken Ulman. “We have conducted a year-long speed study in school zones to see for ourselves if speeding truly is a problem there. The simple answer to that question is ‘yes.’ ”

Police conducted speed studies in a half-mile radius around each school for two school days and determined that 66 percent of cars were traveling over the speed limit. An estimated 18 percent were traveling at least 12 mph over, which is the limit set by state law for citations.

Statistics have shown that the presence of speed cameras can force drivers to slow down. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, there has been a 21 to 51 percent reduction in collisions on roads where mobile speed cameras are used.

Fines generated through the program will be used for public safety programs.

A public hearing on the proposal will take place at 7:30 p.m. at the George Howard Building, Banneker Room, 3430 Court House Drive in Ellicott City. Residents who cannot attend the meeting can offer their comments by calling 410-313-2001 or e-mailing councilmail@howardcountymd.gov.

By Washington Post editors  | March 8, 2011; 1:06 PM ET
Categories:  Crime and Public Safety, Maryland  
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Comments

So 66% were speeding, and of those, an estimated 18% were at least 12mph over the limit. So by these numbers, an estimated 88% of the vehicles were within the LEGAL limits. So in other words, it is not the problem you portray. Just another cash cow as the other jurisdictions have found.

Posted by: curiousGeorge4 | March 8, 2011 7:02 PM | Report abuse

So 66% were speeding, and of those, an estimated 18% were at least 12mph over the limit. So by these numbers, an estimated 82% of the vehicles were within the LEGAL limits. So in other words, it is not the problem you portray. Just another cash cow as the other jurisdictions have found.

Posted by: curiousGeorge4 | March 8, 2011 7:02 PM | Report abuse

MoCo is an addict.

It is addicted to spending.

It will do anything to support that addiction.

This includes the installation of speed cameras.

Posted by: SpeakEasy3 | March 8, 2011 8:37 PM | Report abuse

That 66% of drivers are exceeding the speed limit is proof positive that the scientific basis for choosing that speed limit was ignored.

Posted by: aspade | March 8, 2011 8:46 PM | Report abuse

If everybody "speeds" and there are no accidents caused by exceeding the posted limit, is speeding really a problem? Perhaps a true traffic engineering study is needed to see if the limits are set properly. If there are a lot of crashes, what is the true cause of those accidents? I doubt it is 'exceeding the posted limit.' If they made breathing against the law, and people complained that everybody was still breathing, does it mean that they need to step up enforcement? Or change the law?

Posted by: photoradarscam | March 9, 2011 1:04 AM | Report abuse

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