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Posted at 12:43 PM ET, 01/15/2011

Body on tracks at Farragut North

By Kafia Hosh

UPDATE: 1:57 p.m.

Metro says the Farragut North Station has reopened.

ORIGINAL POST:

D.C. police are investigating a body that was found on a track at the Farragut North Metro station late Saturday morning.

As a result, the Farragut North station is closed. Trains are using a single track through the area, but will not stop at the station. Metro is in the process of setting up a shuttle bus service between the Metro Center, Farragut North and Dupont Circle stations, said Metro spokeswoman Angela Gates.

D.C. Police, Metro transit police and D.C. fire and emergency services are on the scene. No other information is available on the deceased.

Red Line trains were already sharing a track between Friendship Heights and Van Ness, and between New York Avenue and Rhode Island Avenue due to planned maintenance. The weekend closure of the Foggy Bottom station is also causing Blue and Orange line disruptions.

By Kafia Hosh  | January 15, 2011; 12:43 PM ET
Categories:  DC  
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Comments

Someone dies on the rails at a downtown Metro station, and the entirety of the Post's after-incident investigation is "Metro says the Farragut North Station has reopened."

That's some great reporting there folks, particularly for a story linked from at least two spots on the main page.

Having addressed "what, when, and where," would it be too much to ask for at least a paragraph exploring "who and why?" Once upon a time, depth of coverage was what made this news organization great.

Not so much anymore.

Posted by: wahoo2x | January 16, 2011 8:20 AM | Report abuse

Wahoo2x, my thoughts exactly. Well put.

-HokieK :)

Posted by: EdgewoodVA | January 16, 2011 9:07 AM | Report abuse

Obviously neither of you have any idea how reporting and journalism works, especially in this day and age. If "who and why" was known at the time this article was published, trust me, the reporter would have stated so. "Who and why" oftentimes takes a few days to find out, as the police need to conduct an investigation, ID the body, and inform the family.

Thanks to the Internet and demise of the daily newspaper, reporters have a significantly less amount of time to do their reporting. In-depth reporting takes time. Fifty years ago this reporter could have waited to find out all the information, including who and why, before publishing the story. Now, however, the focus is on who can get the basic information out fast enough. I am sure this article will be updated with who and why when the information is available.

If you'd like to change the way the news is being written, start paying for articles. Subscribe to a daily newspaper if you already aren't. That will help out the industry much more than commenting on a story you're reading for free.

Posted by: coldplayer313 | January 16, 2011 11:02 AM | Report abuse

coldplayer313: So, when are you going to address the part about depth of coveraged, and the lack, thereof?

Haste makes waste, period. You can argue that I haven't a clue how journalism works - whatever - just make sure you answer this: What are you doing to to include the "how and why" in such a short amout of time, and if you don't have it, or can't get it, why bother posting or even reporting it?

Aren't you worried about Credibility, or is that no longer a concern in Journalism? Maybe the reason why people won't pay to read online content is because it's incomplete, or not useful?

Posted by: CatMan1 | January 16, 2011 1:44 PM | Report abuse

Ok, it's been 24 hours now. Why is this headline still on the home page of washingtonpost.com with no additional information? Is everyone there on holiday??

Posted by: dlpetersdc | January 16, 2011 1:48 PM | Report abuse

If that body is still on the tracks at Farragut North please remove it!!

Posted by: rpcv84 | January 16, 2011 3:02 PM | Report abuse

Actually...using current journalist techniques a poll should be run to determine what the readers think happened.

Posted by: SugarPop145 | January 16, 2011 6:35 PM | Report abuse

Coldplay 313 is right. 30 years ago this article would wait days to be published. The fact that you guys expect immediate information (who & why), only feeds the journalism you claim to hate. If another news source posted this (even without complete information), everyone would say 'why is The Post so behind the times?' My guess is that the type of person who ends up randomly on the tracks might be hard to identify. Unless the body had ID, it will take a while for police to figure out who it is, much less the why & how.

Posted by: bill721 | January 16, 2011 8:48 PM | Report abuse

Who: A person whose identity you don't need to know.

Why: Suicide.

The story is the closing of the tracks and the disruption of service. If the story was the death, we'd hear more about it. Please don't conflate journalistic standards with your desire for titillation and morbid fascinations.

Posted by: supercub | January 16, 2011 11:09 PM | Report abuse

Who: A person whose identity you don't need to know.

Why: Suicide.

The story is the closing of the tracks and the disruption of service. If the story was the death, we'd hear more about it. Please don't conflate journalistic standards with a desire for titillation and the gratification of morbid fascinations.

Posted by: supercub | January 16, 2011 11:11 PM | Report abuse

Who: A person whose identity you don't need to know.

Why: Suicide.

The story is the closing of the tracks and the disruption of service. If the story was the death, we'd hear more about it. Please don't conflate journalistic standards with a desire for titillation and the gratification of morbid fascinations.

Posted by: supercub | January 16, 2011 11:12 PM | Report abuse

Am I the only one lost with CatMan1's overall point? Are you, CatMan1, trying to say that a body on the Metro tracks isn't newsworthy because the story doesn't ID the individual? If that's your belief, let's just say I'm very glad you aren't the editor.

Also, not a clue how any of this damages the Post's creditability.

@SugarPop145: LOL.

Posted by: coldplayer313 | January 18, 2011 8:42 AM | Report abuse

Supercub, you clearly have no knowledge of journalistic standards yourself.

I am aware of the identity of the person whose body was found because I am a close friend and I can say that this is either a homicide or a fall resulting from an unforseen health condition. The deceased was in no way suicidal; he was making short term and long term plans and was cheerful and satisfied with his life. I am hoping that once the investigation concludes that the name will be released and people will be made aware of just what a tragedy this was.

Posted by: gDot1 | January 18, 2011 12:54 PM | Report abuse

As with gDot1, I am a friend of the deceased. It was not a suicide and we are saddened by this happening. I hope the Post does follow up with a complete story.

Posted by: sfdc | January 19, 2011 12:34 AM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
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