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Posted at 9:13 AM ET, 06/10/2010

D.C. grocer bans water bottles

By Mike McPhate

MOM's Organic Market is getting in on D.C.’s anti-plastic push with a decision to eliminate the sale of water bottles from its six regional markets.

As part of its “Battle the Bottle” campaign, the grocer plans to add water filtration machines in stores, allowing customers to fill their own bottles with up to a gallon at no cost. The new system should be in place within the next few weeks, Scott Nash, the founder and CEO of MOM's, said.

"Societies are truly addicted to plastic, much in the way we are addicted to oil," Nash said in a statement.

Pollution and fears over potentially harmful chemicals in plastic bottles have helped drive anti-plastic sentiment in recent years.

In January, D.C. added a 5-cent tax on plastic bags that has forced a dramatic drop in their use.

-- Mike McPhate

By Mike McPhate  | June 10, 2010; 9:13 AM ET
Categories:  DC  | Tags:  business, washington  
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Comments

There is not a filtration system in this nation what would get me to drink District tap water. Lead anyone?

Posted by: concernedaboutdc | June 10, 2010 9:43 AM | Report abuse

Why not use the plastic bottles to fill all the potholes? There are surely enough of them; there are certainly enough of those.

Posted by: CubsFan | June 10, 2010 10:10 AM | Report abuse

Plastics are not the enemy. Recycling them is the answer. Banning these products is not going to work. Most water bottlers are already taking stems to minimize the amount of plastic used in their products.

Posted by: concernedaboutdc | June 10, 2010 10:28 AM | Report abuse

Dumb idea. Now I would have to take a water bottle TO the store and back home, full of water of unknown quality. Has it occured to this store that people like the convenience of small water bottles that are individually wrapped?

Posted by: PepperDr | June 10, 2010 11:07 AM | Report abuse

... fill up to a gallon at no cost ... so I can fill up four or five small bottles at no charge? Seems fair if MOMs weren't so far out of the way.

Posted by: blackforestcherry | June 10, 2010 12:19 PM | Report abuse

Dumb idea. Now I would have to take a water bottle TO the store and back home, full of water of unknown quality. Has it occured to this store that people like the convenience of small water bottles that are individually wrapped?

Posted by: PepperDr | June 10, 2010 11:07 AM | Report abuse

Has it ever occurred to you that if you think the water sold in plastic bottles is "safer" or "cleaner" you're an idiot?

Posted by: Bigfoot_has_a_posse | June 10, 2010 12:51 PM | Report abuse

Why bother? Just buy your own filtration system and bottle your own. Tap mounted fixtures and Brita pitchers are fairly cheap. Also, if you live in the DC area, you are probably getting your water from the same source as Moms.

Posted by: GP04 | June 10, 2010 1:29 PM | Report abuse

Bigfoot--has it ever occured to you that no one has tested the filtered water at MOM's. EVER? How do we know how often the filter is changed? How do you know that the previous user didn't put his dirty, dog walking hands all over the spigot? For all you know, it could be coming straight from the toilet. Recent studies have shown that drinks from soda fountains contain high levels of fecal bacteria. It comes from too many nasty hands touching the equipment. The same will happen at Mom's. Enjoy, you fool.

Posted by: PepperDr | June 10, 2010 1:34 PM | Report abuse

Interesting to read so much mis-conception about water. I'm in the water business and there certainly are systems - Reverse Osmosis for sure - that will remove any harmful constituents from DC or any other water. They remove bacteria, viruses, heavy metals, etc. Yes, filters need to be changed and use of an alcohol swab on the faucet and handle given it's public access is probably a good idea. But the notion that bottled water is the best water is simply not true.

Posted by: BillCWS | June 10, 2010 4:15 PM | Report abuse

A reusable water with a built-in filter would be of great use for those are against the use of bottled water; I found one at www.hydrosbottle.com.

Posted by: kiranparekh | June 10, 2010 8:14 PM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
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