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Posted at 5:41 PM ET, 08/11/2010

Md., Texas men killed in plane crash

By Washington Post editors

Two men from Maryland and Texas have been identified as those killed when a small plane crashed after leaving an airport in western Massachusetts.

Renee Steese, first Northwestern assistant district attorney, said Wednesday the victims were 61-year-old Jack A. Johnson of Ellicott City, and 52-year-old Joseph J. Jaso, Jr. of San Antonio. Federal authorities have said the plane was registered to Johnson.

The single-engine Cessna 172 was headed to Maine when it crashed just after 9 p.m. Tuesday in Orange. Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Jim Peters said it had just left Orange Municipal Airport, and went down in a wooded area about a mile to the north.

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating.

-- Associated Press

By Washington Post editors  | August 11, 2010; 5:41 PM ET
Categories:  Maryland, Traffic and Transportation  
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Comments

Speaking of Cessna have you heard? Have you not seen the new safety bulletin out on Cessna aircraft about the hazards associated with undetectable water in the Cessna 100, 200 and 300 series aircraft? Try Google by typing in SAIB Number: CE-10-40R1....read all about it. Around 250,000 Cessna aircraft in which pilots are being told to go to weird, impossible lengths trying to get all the water out of their wing fuel tanks. Sad thing is, no matter what the pilot does to detect or eliminate water from the fuel tanks, it is an effort in futility.

No matter what you do you will have or get water in the fuel tanks of Cessna aircraft. No amount of prevention will protect you against contaminated fuel. What is supposed to protect you, the pilot, is the certification of the aircraft by the FAA. The FAA also is supposed to certify the preflight procedure. Do not believe in FAA certification when it comes to the Cessna Aircraft? Instead, do this simple test. Take a 16 ounce Dixie cup filled with water, add a drop of red food color, stir and go pour it into any Cessna fuel tank as it sits in its normal ground attitude. Then go to the sump drain and see if you can positively detect and then eliminate the same 16 ounces of red dyed water you just poured into the fuel tank. GOOD LUCK!

Posted by: rescessna | August 12, 2010 1:12 PM | Report abuse

Speaking of Cessna have you heard? Have you not seen the new safety bulletin out on Cessna aircraft about the hazards associated with undetectable water in the Cessna 100, 200 and 300 series aircraft? Try Google by typing in SAIB Number: CE-10-40R1....read all about it. Around 250,000 Cessna aircraft in which pilots are being told to go to weird, impossible lengths trying to get all the water out of their wing fuel tanks. Sad thing is, no matter what the pilot does to detect or eliminate water from the fuel tanks, it is an effort in futility.

No matter what you do you will have or get water in the fuel tanks of Cessna aircraft. No amount of prevention will protect you against contaminated fuel. What is supposed to protect you, the pilot, is the certification of the aircraft by the FAA. The FAA also is supposed to certify the preflight procedure. Do not believe in FAA certification when it comes to the Cessna Aircraft? Instead, do this simple test. Take a 16 ounce Dixie cup filled with water, add a drop of red food color, stir and go pour it into any Cessna fuel tank as it sits in its normal ground attitude. Then go to the sump drain and see if you can positively detect and then eliminate the same 16 ounces of red dyed water you just poured into the fuel tank. GOOD LUCK!

Posted by: rescessna | August 12, 2010 1:14 PM | Report abuse

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