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Posted at 8:59 AM ET, 11/12/2010

More intersex fish found in Md., Del.

By Associated Press

University of Maryland scientists say they’ve found intersex fish on the Eastern Shore and in Delaware, The Baltimore Sun reports.

And scientists have a new theory about the source of the condition: They believe it can be traced to the poultry manure that’s used as fertilizer in the region.

Scientists say they found male largemouth bass carrying eggs in six lakes and ponds on the Delmarva Peninsula sampled over the past two years. Intersex fish have also been found in the Potomac and Susquehanna rivers.

Researchers say the intersex condition of the fish on the Shore is not as severe, but it appears to be just as widespread.

Intersex fish are a concern because they could be indicators of contaminants in the water.

The lakes and ponds checked were in Queen Anne’s and Caroline counties in Maryland and in Kent and Sussex counties in Delaware.

By Associated Press  | November 12, 2010; 8:59 AM ET
Categories:  Maryland  
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Comments

"cause for alarm" is an understatement.

Posted by: MarilynManson | November 12, 2010 11:27 AM | Report abuse

So if I eat one of these intersex fish could I grow female organs? Could I impregnat myself? Will I become transgender? The Republicans should hold hearings to investigate this!

Posted by: Jimof1913 | November 12, 2010 12:06 PM | Report abuse

I think this means if you eat the fish you begin to sound like Perez Hilton, enjoy watching Oprah but still have to shave.

Posted by: BigDaddy651 | November 12, 2010 1:13 PM | Report abuse

Lmao!

Posted by: Twecious | November 12, 2010 3:31 PM | Report abuse

DON'T ASK DON'T TELL

Posted by: pejochum | November 12, 2010 3:32 PM | Report abuse

The "discovery" of these "mutant" fish hit "home" for me without any pun intended. I was born and raised in Milton, Sussex County, Delaware and lived there from 1950-68.

Even as children, my older brother and I used to remark to each other that there seemed to be an inordinate number of Milton's residents who had speech impediments, dementia, orthopedic deformities and an alarming number of cases of Muscular Dystrophy and Muscular Sclerosis. Even our beloved and sole "town doctor" succumbed to it in 1965. He was only 50 years old.

Also, in 1960, 2 boys on my Little League team came down with TYPHOID FEVER. I vividly recall the entire population of Milton lined up at the Milton Fire Hall in a state of panic, to receive "typhoid fever shots." I am not sure, but I thought that typhoid fever was a disease that had been confined to third world countries for quite some time before 1960.

Our family lived in front of Wagamon's Pond which fed into larger bodies of water. Literally every day, the man who cleaned cesspools in town would park his red and yellow truck by the lake, extend a long hose into the lake and discharge hundreds of gallons of human feces into the lake year after year after year after year. We used to stand on our pier and see feces floating in the water on a daily basis. The stench of human waste pervaded the air most of the time. Nobody dared to swim in the lake except 2 juvenile delinquent brothers who dove off the "mill dam" into the fetid, brown water below. At some point, there was a rumor among Miltonians that Wagamon's Pond would have to be "drained." How this measure would have ameliorated the problem I do not know. I suppose that, at the very least, the man who discharged human waste into the lake would no longer be able to do so.

When the EPA was created, I had already mericifully left Milton for college. However, my father told me that the EPA had become aware of the large-scale pollution of Wagamon's Pond. He told me that the EPA had ordered the cesspool cleaner to cease and desist from his actions. My father (who was a small business owner as well as the town "scribe") told me that several businessmen approached him requesting that he write a letter to the EPA imploring them to rescind their "cease and desist" letter because it was "putting a good man out of work." My father refused their request and,to my knowledge, the cesspool discharge stopped in the early 1970's.

It doesn't take a "scientist" or "environmental engineer" to hypothesize that there may well be a positive correlation between the repetitive pollution of Wagamon's Pond and the "discovery" of mutant fish in the area especially given the fact that so many of Milton's inhabitants were afflicted by these maladies. I wanted to pass this history along to any epidemiologists who may want to investigate this problem which may well have first manifested itself in the human population of Milton.

Posted by: robshapiro | November 12, 2010 10:46 PM | Report abuse

The "discovery" of these "mutant" fish hit "home" for me without any pun intended. I was born and raised in Milton, Sussex County, Delaware and lived there from 1950-68.

Even as children, my older brother and I used to remark to each other that there seemed to be an inordinate number of Milton's residents who had speech impediments, dementia, orthopedic deformities and an alarming number of cases of Muscular Dystrophy and Muscular Sclerosis. Even our beloved and sole "town doctor" succumbed to it in 1965. He was only 50 years old.

Also, in 1960, 2 boys on my Little League team came down with TYPHOID FEVER. I vividly recall the entire population of Milton lined up at the Milton Fire Hall in a state of panic, to receive "typhoid fever shots." I am not sure, but I thought that typhoid fever was a disease that had been confined to third world countries for quite some time before 1960.

Our family lived in front of Wagamon's Pond which fed into larger bodies of water. Literally every day, the man who cleaned cesspools in town would park his red and yellow truck by the lake, extend a long hose into the lake and discharge hundreds of gallons of human feces into the lake year after year after year after year. We used to stand on our pier and see feces floating in the water on a daily basis. The stench of human waste pervaded the air most of the time. Nobody dared to swim in the lake except 2 juvenile delinquent brothers who dove off the "mill dam" into the fetid, brown water below. At some point, there was a rumor among Miltonians that Wagamon's Pond would have to be "drained." How this measure would have ameliorated the problem I do not know. I suppose that, at the very least, the man who discharged human waste into the lake would no longer be able to do so.

When the EPA was created, I had already mericifully left Milton for college. However, my father told me that the EPA had become aware of the large-scale pollution of Wagamon's Pond. He told me that the EPA had ordered the cesspool cleaner to cease and desist from his actions. My father (who was a small business owner as well as the town "scribe") told me that several businessmen approached him requesting that he write a letter to the EPA imploring them to rescind their "cease and desist" letter because it was "putting a good man out of work." My father refused their request and,to my knowledge, the cesspool discharge stopped in the early 1970's.

It doesn't take a "scientist" or "environmental engineer" to hypothesize that there may well be a positive correlation between the repetitive pollution of Wagamon's Pond and the "discovery" of mutant fish in the area especially given the fact that so many of Milton's inhabitants were afflicted by these maladies. I wanted to pass this history along to any epidemiologists who may want to investigate this problem which may well have first manifested itself in the human population of Milton.

Posted by: robshapiro | November 12, 2010 10:47 PM | Report abuse

The "discovery" of these "mutant" fish hit "home" for me without any pun intended. I was born and raised in Milton, Sussex County, Delaware and lived there from 1950-68.

Even as children, my older brother and I used to remark to each other that there seemed to be an inordinate number of Milton's residents who had speech impediments, dementia, orthopedic deformities and an alarming number of cases of Muscular Dystrophy and Muscular Sclerosis. Even our beloved and sole "town doctor" succumbed to it in 1965. He was only 50 years old.

Also, in 1960, 2 boys on my Little League team came down with TYPHOID FEVER. I vividly recall the entire population of Milton lined up at the Milton Fire Hall in a state of panic, to receive "typhoid fever shots." I am not sure, but I thought that typhoid fever was a disease that had been confined to third world countries for quite some time before 1960.

Our family lived in front of Wagamon's Pond which fed into larger bodies of water. Literally every day, the man who cleaned cesspools in town would park his red and yellow truck by the lake, extend a long hose into the lake and discharge hundreds of gallons of human feces into the lake year after year after year after year. We used to stand on our pier and see feces floating in the water on a daily basis. The stench of human waste pervaded the air most of the time. Nobody dared to swim in the lake except 2 juvenile delinquent brothers who dove off the "mill dam" into the fetid, brown water below. At some point, there was a rumor among Miltonians that Wagamon's Pond would have to be "drained." How this measure would have ameliorated the problem I do not know. I suppose that, at the very least, the man who discharged human waste into the lake would no longer be able to do so.

When the EPA was created, I had already mericifully left Milton for college. However, my father told me that the EPA had become aware of the large-scale pollution of Wagamon's Pond. He told me that the EPA had ordered the cesspool cleaner to cease and desist from his actions. My father (who was a small business owner as well as the town "scribe") told me that several businessmen approached him requesting that he write a letter to the EPA imploring them to rescind their "cease and desist" letter because it was "putting a good man out of work." My father refused their request and,to my knowledge, the cesspool discharge stopped in the early 1970's.

It doesn't take a "scientist" or "environmental engineer" to hypothesize that there may well be a positive correlation between the repetitive pollution of Wagamon's Pond and the "discovery" of mutant fish in the area especially given the fact that so many of Milton's inhabitants were afflicted by these maladies. I wanted to pass this history along to any epidemiologists who may want to investigate this problem which may well have first manifested itself in the human population of Milton.

Posted by: robshapiro | November 12, 2010 10:48 PM | Report abuse

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