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Posted at 10:55 AM ET, 11/30/2010

Humane Society sues Perdue Farms

By Washington Post editors

The Humane Society of the United States filed a class action lawsuit Monday in New Jersey against Maryland-based Perdue Farms, accusing the nation's third-largest poultry producer of falsely advertising its chickens as "humanely raised," The Baltimore Sun reports.

The suit was brought on behalf of a New Jersey woman who bought chicken at a BJ's Wholesale Club bearing the Harvestland label, a trade name used by Perdue for birds raised in Kentucky and marketed as "purely all-natural" and "humanely raised."

The suit alleges that the poultry producer's marketing violates New Jersey's consumer fraud law. The complaint seeks unspecified compensatory and punitive damages against Perdue, as well as an injunction barring it from making claims that it treats its birds humanely.

Read more about the Humane Society's lawsuit against Perdue Farms in The Baltimore Sun.

By Washington Post editors  | November 30, 2010; 10:55 AM ET
Categories:  Maryland  
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Comments

Have you seen Food Inc.?

Good Move. I'm glad someone is strong enough to stand up to these companies - even if it isn't our Government. Shame on you, FDA.

Posted by: jellybean5 | November 30, 2010 11:48 AM | Report abuse

Where does a purely political organization like the Humane Society of the U.S. get off defining for the rest of us what is or is not "humane?" Last I looked HSUS spends nary a dime on hands-on animal care, less than 1% of its total $130-plus million budget, but fritters away its tax-exempt contributions trying to tell farmers how to farm, medical researchers how to find cures and treatments for disease, pet owners what to feed, suing chicken companies and launching multi-million dollar campaigns to win narrow state ballot initiatives. Why do people give this group money? The hubris is staggering, but what can we expect from an organization where the top leaders are vegan and vegetarian devotees? As one critic once put it, HSUS is just PETA in a nicer suit...

Posted by: skopperud | November 30, 2010 12:34 PM | Report abuse

Where does a purely political organization like the Humane Society of the U.S. get off defining for the rest of us what is or is not "humane?" Last I looked HSUS spends nary a dime on hands-on animal care, less than 1% of its total $130-plus million budget, but fritters away its tax-exempt contributions trying to tell farmers how to farm, medical researchers how to find cures and treatments for disease, pet owners what to feed, suing chicken companies and launching multi-million dollar campaigns to win narrow state ballot initiatives. Why do people give this group money? The hubris is staggering, but what can we expect from an organization where the top leaders are vegan and vegetarian devotees? As one critic once put it, HSUS is just PETA in a nicer suit...

Posted by: skopperud | November 30, 2010 12:34 PM | Report abuse

Skopperud, maybe you should actually read the lawsuit and educate yourself about consumer protection laws before you launch into a slanderous diatribe. This lawsuit is not about HSUS telling people what is humane, it's about what AVERAGE CONSUMERS THINK is humane. When a company advertises that something is humanely raised, consumer protection law looks to what most people think that actually means. When a company does the opposite of that, it's liable under consumer protection laws.

And by the way, PETA hates this kind of stuff because it legitimizes humanely raised meat. So please educate yourself before you take your extreme views to this board.

Posted by: VirginiaDad | November 30, 2010 12:46 PM | Report abuse

For the ignorant such as "Skopperud", companies have a set of standards that they must meet that the USDA has set out. These standards allow them (perdue) to place verbage such as "humanely raised" on their packaging. It's apparent that the USHS would be able to recognize the standards being arbitrated. I commend the USHS for getting this out there!

Posted by: DCer10 | November 30, 2010 12:49 PM | Report abuse

skopperud: It's doesn't take alot of intelligence to tell humane from inhumane treatment. Get off our "anti-regulation" high-horse, and try to display some. It's our ability to treat other living things humanely that is supposed to set us a part from the "animals".

Posted by: jckdoors | November 30, 2010 1:39 PM | Report abuse

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