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Posted at 8:18 AM ET, 05/10/2010

Md. flush with teaching applicants

By Washington Post editors

While they anxiously wait to find out whether their teaching jobs in northern New Jersey will survive that state's budget cuts, Christopher Bell and his wife are beginning to consider where they might go to find employment, the Baltimore Sun reports.

Maryland is appealing because most of its school systems are not planning to lay off teachers. So Bell is putting in his paperwork to get a teaching certificate there.

It is teachers like Bell who are making schools across Maryland feel suddenly flush with high-quality job applicants to fill the fewer-than-usual number of vacancies. This is a time, human resource officers say, that they will have their pick of the best and the brightest.

"We are probably getting more applicants than ever before because we are more stable than ever before," said Jean Satterfield, assistant superintendent for certification and accreditation at the State Department of Education.

But the state is unusual. A survey by the National Education Association and the American Federation of Teachers, the two largest teacher unions in the nation, shows that 150,000 education jobs, including many teaching positions, are now threatened.

By Washington Post editors  | May 10, 2010; 8:18 AM ET
 
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Comments

It's a shame many of their pupils are those of illegals who do not speak English.

Posted by: member8 | May 10, 2010 9:51 AM | Report abuse

@Member8, what constitutes many? According to the most recent census the total hispanic population accounts for only 7% of the total Maryland population. I personally went through Maryland schools from 1st to 12th grades; I could count the number of non-native speakers on both hands. In the DC metro area I think you'll find the largest number of illegals in the NoVA area not Maryland. Also, from my understanding Maryland no longer allows illegals to get drivers licenses.

Posted by: VoiceofReason77 | May 10, 2010 10:17 AM | Report abuse

How about the % of hispanic under 18? You'll get a much different number.

Posted by: member8 | May 10, 2010 10:51 AM | Report abuse

Shhhh, don't tell Jerry Weast, who's ready to sue MoCo to stop further cuts in their already bloated school budget.

You see, MoCo schools couldn't POSSIBLY do without constant increases in funding b/c its teachers will leave for other jurisdictions (so we're told). This article shows that they're more than well-paid now and will continue to attract new teachers to "replace" those who walk out.

Keep cutting the MoCo school budget to spread the pain we all must share. Tell Jerry to take a hike.

Posted by: B-rod | May 10, 2010 12:26 PM | Report abuse

“We are probably getting more applicants than ever before because we are more stable than ever before," said Jean Satterfield, assistant superintendent for certification and accreditation at the State Department of Education.
Satterfield needs to look at the state budget again. When the stimulus money goes away next year, revenues decline and our unemployment keeps going up the story will be considerably different than her present opinion.
Voiceofreason77: Perhaps you need to see who funds CASA of Maryland’s through the dollars supplied by the taxpayers. This state and certain counties have become sanctuary areas for illegal immigrants and the costs will show sooner or later.

Posted by: OhBrother67 | May 10, 2010 6:53 PM | Report abuse

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