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Posted at 2:20 PM ET, 05/11/2010

Casteen seeks notification on crimes

By Washington Post editors


University of Virginia President John T. Casteen met with Virginia Gov. Robert F. McDonnell (R) today to ask him to change state law so college officials would be notified if students are arrested.

The meeting between the two leaders came after U-Va. lacrosse player George Huguely was charged in the death of fellow student Yeardley Love, 22, a player on U-Va.'s women's lacrosse team.

Casteen said Tuesday that if he knew that Huguely had been arrested in 2008 for trying to hurt a police officer, he would have been suspended, perhaps even expelled.

McDonnell said he plans to speak to other university presidents in the coming weeks, and at a campus safety conference next month in Richmond. The soonest the General Assembly would be able to change the law would be next January, unless McDonnell calls legislators back for a special session later this year.

Full coverage of this story can be found here.

-- Anita Kumar

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By Washington Post editors  | May 11, 2010; 2:20 PM ET
Categories:  Crime and Public Safety, Virginia  | Tags:  College and University, Lacrosse, Police officer, University of Virginia, Virginia, Women, Women's lacrosse  
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Comments

Isn't that public record? I mean seriously..

Posted by: rockettonu | May 11, 2010 2:35 PM | Report abuse

Notify about arrests or once they are charged? To notify about an arrest is unconstitutional! How about the wrongly accused?

Posted by: rockettonu | May 11, 2010 2:40 PM | Report abuse

Sounds like UVA is blaming Richmond for not doing their homework for them.

Posted by: HughJassPhD | May 11, 2010 3:00 PM | Report abuse

Why stop at colleges? Why not notify employers when employees are arrested. Neighborhoods when neighbors are arrested?

It´s bad enough that, in America, a mere ARREST is enough to taint you for life (because every cop who ever looks you up on on NCIC will know about it, and Google´s index of public records will also eventually catch up with you). Now, we´re passing laws that cops have to actively publicize your arrest to those around you.

Such laws provide even more unaccountable power to the police. Now, cops have an even easier ´hammer´ with which to ruin the lives of those whose only offense was perhaps ¨failing the attitude test,¨ or the ever-popular ¨contempt of cop.¨

America is becoming, by degrees, a police state. And as with all changes that happen only by degrees, it´s all too easy not to notice until it is MUCH too late.

Posted by: kcx7 | May 11, 2010 3:39 PM | Report abuse

Mr. Casteen,
As last year and the year before and the year before, you have everything you need to check on student arrest records. You just want somebody else to pay for it and you don't want to accept the responsibility or be accountable for showing innovation and vision.

My advice Sir: Have a vision for the multi-billion dollar University not related to enriching it and yourself.
.

Posted by: hz9604 | May 11, 2010 3:48 PM | Report abuse

When colleges and universities were in loco parentis, there was cooperation between administrators and local authorities. A dean, for example, might be called to get students out of the drunk tank or jail. This happened when, in the end, there were no charges. The question needs to be what will colleges and universities be able to do with students who get in trouble with the police.

Posted by: jlhare1 | May 11, 2010 3:59 PM | Report abuse

When colleges and universities were in loco parentis, there was cooperation between administrators and local authorities. A dean, for example, might be called to get students out of the drunk tank or jail. This happened when, in the end, there were no charges. The question needs to be what will colleges and universities be able to do with students who get in trouble with the police.

Posted by: jlhare1 | May 11, 2010 4:00 PM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
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