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Posted at 9:41 AM ET, 05/17/2010

A slimmer senior discount on Metro

By washingtonpost.com editors

By Irving Slott
Silver Spring

Regarding the May 13 Metro article “Metro readies sweeping fare hikes”:

I retired from government after 23 years in 1992 at age 70. Having lost my parking place when I was 62 to an excess of political appointees, I began taking the Metro. I liked it. I always had a seat and pleasantly read my morning “Post.” Later, I refused the offer of another parking place. After I became eligible and began using the senior citizen farecard, I rode to work and home paying the very lowest fare. It often occurred to me that I was then making more and riding cheaper than almost all the others on the train.

Since I assume the senior citizen fare is intended to ease the burden on retirees, it stands to reason that the low fares should be effective only during non-rush hours. This should be a simple problem to program into the same system which deducts fare amounts when you exit the Metro. It is justifiable and seniors should have no basis in equity to object. Has this ever been considered? If so, why has it not been instituted?


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By washingtonpost.com editors  | May 17, 2010; 9:41 AM ET
Categories:  D.C., HotTopic, Metro, transportation  | Tags:  Generations and Age Groups, Rush hour, Senior citizen, Seniors  
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Comments


There are Organizations that places seniors as contract workers in Federal offices. They are paid a salary that does not compare with federal salary. The starting salary is (lowest level maximum is 8.68 and the highest level is 16.27. Unlike Federal employees, we do not get transit subsidy. Majority of these seniors are not making more but less. Some of them are not receiving retirement, only Social Security. We also work 8 hours a day and we have to travel during the rush hours. There are also seniors that are employed as blue collar workers but do not get paid the regular salary. Those that feel that they are making too much to receive the discount– it is not mandatory, just purchase the Smart Trip and do not program it for senior discount. Do not deprive those that are less fortunate than you and really need this discount.

Posted by: alstonclara | May 24, 2010 9:45 AM | Report abuse

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