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Posted at 9:55 AM ET, 07/12/2010

MARC's track record

By washingtonpost.com editors

By Sudarshan Gupta,
Glenn Dale

To Anna Piranian’s review of the June 21 breakdown of MARC Train 538 [Local Opinions, July 4], I would like to add that it would be excusable if it was unforeseen and this train’s first breakdown. Before June 21, however, MARC Train 538 broke down at least two times that I know of, stranding passengers for an hour or more. I, too, was on the June 21 train and, seeing no signs of relief, joined a long line of passengers trudging along the railroad tracks to the Cheverly Metro station more than a mile away.

This breakdown should have been foreseen and provided for. The Penn Line has been beset with problems in the 20 years I have been riding it: lateness, overcrowding and breakdowns, to name a few. A major commuter rail line in the nation’s capital should perform better.



By washingtonpost.com editors  | July 12, 2010; 9:55 AM ET
Categories:  Baltimore, Maryland, public health, transportation  
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Comments

I'd be inclined to agree with the idea that MARC should run better were it not for a general malaise in America towards providing proper funding for rail capacity in every locale.

We're consistently pennywise and pound-foolish, deferring maintenance to make up revenue shortfalls elsewhere in the budget and allowing rolling stock to decay to the point of uselessness. Unless and until we change that, and we start paying the TAXES that support public-sector rail, we can and should continue to expect poor reliability.

Posted by: jamessamans | July 12, 2010 4:11 PM | Report abuse

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