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Posted at 6:13 PM ET, 12/15/2010

This train might move ... eventually

By Kevin McCormally, Washington

To the roster of Great Lies ("Sure, I'll respect you in the morning," "I'm from the government, and I'm here to help," etc.) we must add: "This train will be moving momentarily."

I heard that at least two dozen times during Monday's disrupted morning rush hour. Since it's clear that Metro can't run the trains on time, might it at least eliminate the word "momentarily" from train conductors' vocabularies?

By Kevin McCormally, Washington  | December 15, 2010; 6:13 PM ET
Categories:  D.C., Metro, transportation  
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Comments

This comment typically followed by another meaningless line: "Another train is immediately behind this one." Yeah, sure.

Posted by: purcellbry | December 15, 2010 9:38 PM | Report abuse

This "Train" will never move. The reason is because a person can travel in their cars for less money and hassle when ariving at their destination than this train would, and in most cases for less money. Why do you think that our old train system was shut down. The USA is nothing like any European Country and will never be like them. Everyone here is so very independant and will do things the way we want to do them.

Posted by: randykree | December 16, 2010 11:16 AM | Report abuse

Hi,

I agree this is an annoying comment, especially as "momentarily" means "for a moment" and not "in a moment". Plus, it has one more syllable than the plain English equivalent. Add it to the list of words used wrongly, e.g. "disinterest" doesn't mean a lack of interest and the verb "to lay" needs a direct object. Oh, and "utilize" is just a fancy way to say "use".

Posted by: TomM5 | December 16, 2010 11:39 AM | Report abuse

I really hate the conductors who think that using the word "myself" instead of "me" makes them sound more professional.

@Randykree, umm, something tells me that you don't commute to downtown Washington. And if you do, you have a really nice job that gives you free parking.

Posted by: Booyah5000 | December 16, 2010 6:26 PM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
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