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Posted at 4:59 PM ET, 01/19/2011

Getting Virginia out of a jam

By Ron Glaser, Haymarket

The Jan. 16 Metro article on Virginia’s transportation problems, “N. Va. likely to be stuck a bit longer,” noted that the state has gone 25 years without raising its fuel tax of 17.5 cents a gallon. Our legislators’ obsession about not raising taxes has a seriously flawed underpinning: the belief that higher taxes would cause Virginians too much pain.

I don’t know how others feel, but I would prefer the pain of paying a little more in taxes to that of wasting countless hours in daily traffic jams.

By Ron Glaser, Haymarket  | January 19, 2011; 4:59 PM ET
Categories:  Va. Politics, Virginia, taxes, traffic, transportation  
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Comments

What a strange sense of reasoning. I would suppose that Ron also thinks that if property taxes are raised, that schools will produce more educated students. Or, if Obama and Congress raise income taxes, the government will spend the extra money more wisely or a real joke that Congress would vow to cut spending and pay down the debt! I'm now and so are all of you, paying 50 cents more per gallon than in the recent past, but that doesn't change where I need to go or how I intend to get there. Ron, higher taxes just make life tougher for the middle to lower income families.

You want to get people off the roads? Simple, ban cars (don't laugh too hard, the anti-carbon weenies would be happy to do that). You want the government to spend more money? Simple, raise taxes.

Posted by: nototresspassers | January 19, 2011 6:37 PM | Report abuse

Why is there this feeling that if a tax does not go up, the government is somehow being cheated? It is like In New Jersey, the activists who want to spend our money claim that because NJ has the third-lowest gas tax in the country, it should raise it. Of course, anyone who would seek to lower taxes in high tax states does not receive similar applause from the Post and other liberals.

Posted by: Nemo24601 | January 19, 2011 8:25 PM | Report abuse

Raising the gas tax, and the price of gas, would at least create in people the thought to plan their trips better or whether they were necessary at all. I don't know the exact percentage, but I strongly suspect it's a large one, of people on the road at any given time who just really don't have to be there. They are not on their way to or from work or something necessary, they're just doing something because it's convenient. Well, it's time to make it a little more inconvenient and get them out of my way.

Posted by: ronjaboy | January 20, 2011 6:38 AM | Report abuse

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