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Posted at 10:40 AM ET, 01/20/2011

Traffic? What traffic?

By Dan Malouff

Apparently the Washington region has bad traffic congestion. That’s a bummer.

I say “apparently” because I virtually never experience any of it first hand, since I’ve opted out of the lifestyle that requires people to sit in traffic. I live in the city, where it’s easier and faster to get around by walking, transit, cycling and the occasional taxicab than by driving, so traffic congestion is simply not something I ever have to think about. I can remember exactly one traffic jam that I’ve been a part of over the past year, and it happened while visiting family one weekend in western Fairfax County. In my normal day-to-day routine, I haven't been in a traffic jam in years.

Traffic jams are a choice. People choose to subject themselves to them based on where they choose to live and how they choose to get around. For me, opting out was an easy decision.

Dan Malouff is an Arlington County transportation planner who blogs independently at BeyondDC.com. The Local Blog Network is a group of bloggers from around the D.C. region who have agreed to make regular contributions to All Opinions Are Local.

By Dan Malouff  | January 20, 2011; 10:40 AM ET
Categories:  D.C., HotTopic, Local blog network, traffic, transportation  
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Comments

I employ a less complete version. I am congizant, however, of the fact that the attitude displayed in this blog infuriates suburban dwellers, not to mention exurban ones. They correctly think that this is a "solution" that would not work for many--the infrastructure investment's already been made for an autocentric way of life, and further, the sheer numbers of people in the SMSA could not be accomodated in the inner suburbs.

And finally, while it is a choice with drawbacks, it's also true that the postwar American suburb still represents an attractive choice to millions here--they would simply reject your alternative choice.

Posted by: krickey7 | January 20, 2011 11:24 AM | Report abuse

Wow, what a pointless piece. So any problem that does not affect you is, prima facie, not a problem? Thanks for nothing -- step aside and let someone else blog in this column.

Posted by: cgp01 | January 20, 2011 10:03 PM | Report abuse

Wow, what a pointless piece. So any problem that does not affect you is, prima facie, not a problem? Thanks for nothing -- step aside and let someone else blog in this column.

Posted by: cgp01 | January 20, 2011 10:05 PM | Report abuse

I don't have any children in the DC public school system, so the dismal state of the public schools in the District is just not a problem for me. Bad schools are a choice -- people choose to subject themselves to bad schools when they decided to have children. Don't have children and the quality of public schools just isn't a problem!

Posted by: WashingtonDame | January 21, 2011 8:58 AM | Report abuse

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