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Posted at 5:39 PM ET, 02/21/2011

Coal ships clog Hampton Roads

By Peter Galuszka

A curious scene awaits onlookers viewing the waters of Hampton Roads -- at least 18 ships swing at anchor waiting for dock space to export U.S. coal.

The last time as many coal ships were lining up at Virginia's largest port in such a way was back in 1979 when the Iranian political crisis touched off a spike in global petroleum prices. Back then as many as 150 ships waited for dock space at coal piers in Norfolk and Newport News.

This time, however, the reason for the back-up is different. Despite the global recession, the building boom in China and other Asian countries has generated great demand for U.S. metallurgical coal, primarily from the fields of West Virginia, Kentucky and Virginia. The U.S. Energy Information Administration says that coking coal exports shot up to 55 million tons in 2010, an increase of more than 30 percent from 2009.

Other factors for the boom are floods that shut down Australian coal mines.

It seem strange that demand is so strong for a product that seems so 19th century. But it is, despite worries about climate change, mine safety and mountaintop removal.

Peter Galuszka blogs at Bacon's Rebellion. The Local Blog Network is a group of bloggers from around the D.C. region who have agreed to make regular contributions to All Opinions Are Local.

By Peter Galuszka  | February 21, 2011; 5:39 PM ET
Categories:  Local blog network, Virginia, economy, energy, transportation  
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Comments

Also just reported that India Steel sector needs over 85 MT coking coal in 2011-12; Mostly imported.

last week reported that India looking to buy West Virginia coal mines. Patriot coal ticker PCX looks to be a good buy with ~20 million ton thermal and 8 million ton met production.

Posted by: lowpdop | February 21, 2011 8:11 PM | Report abuse

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