Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity
Posted at 7:23 PM ET, 02/ 7/2011

Going ballistic over a pea-shooter

By Richard Kennedy, Lorton

The Feb. 2 Metro article “Va. student expelled for shooting pellets” stirred some old memories. When I was a student in New York in the 1950s, almost every boy had a similar “weapon” — they were called pea-shooters. A student caught using this nefarious device would have it confiscated and would possibly be sent to detention after school, but nothing more than that for such a trivial offense.

By Richard Kennedy, Lorton  | February 7, 2011; 7:23 PM ET
Categories:  Virginia, crime, education, schools  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: New life for 'no taxation, no representation'
Next: The value of a Prince George's 'prerogative'

Comments

Well I was in school during the 1970s and you probably would have gotten an afternoon of detention for such a crime.

The truly scary part is back then I thought grown-ups didn't have a clue. Now I know it to be true with today's educators. Are these people my peers??

Posted by: LMarie1 | February 8, 2011 12:41 PM | Report abuse

When I was in school during the '90s, spitballs (spit + paper wad) were more than enough.

My gawd, the pea-shootin' weaponry & ammo just keep getting more and more sophistamacated!

Damn dangerous kids!! *shaking fist*

Posted by: FedUpInMoCo | February 8, 2011 5:26 PM | Report abuse

Post a Comment

We encourage users to analyze, comment on and even challenge washingtonpost.com's articles, blogs, reviews and multimedia features.

User reviews and comments that include profanity or personal attacks or other inappropriate comments or material will be removed from the site. Additionally, entries that are unsigned or contain "signatures" by someone other than the actual author will be removed. Finally, we will take steps to block users who violate any of our posting standards, terms of use or privacy policies or any other policies governing this site. Please review the full rules governing commentaries and discussions.




characters remaining

 
 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2011 The Washington Post Company