Archive: Chinese New Year

Cook's Grab Bag: Year of the Rat, CSA Sign-Up, Spinach Salad

Gung Hay Fat Choy! Today is the beginning of the year 4706 on the Lunar Calendar. It is the year of the Rat - and if you were born in 1936, 1948, 1960, 1972, 1984 or 1996, this is your year, kid. The first sign of the Chinese zodiac (in the Western zodiac, it's Aries), the Rat is characterized as industrious and ambitious, a sing that is willing to take risks. It signifies new beginnings, so this would be a good year to put long-stewing plans into action. Over the past several years, I've consulted cookbook author Grace Young ("Breath of a Wok") for guidance on how to commemorate Lunar New Year at the stove. As she explained in an online chat with me a few years ago, the Chinese prepare foods that symbolize good health, prosperity and fortune and strength on the domestic/family front. I didn't get my act...

 

By Kim ODonnel | February 7, 2008; 10:44 AM ET | Comments (8)

Year of the Pig Dumplings

This weekend, the dog steps aside and makes way for the pig in the Chinese lunar calendar. Beginning Sunday, Feb. 18, it's Year 4705, or Year of the Pig. Gung hay fat choy! (That's Cantonese for Happy New Year, or literally, "May you become prosperous.") In celebration of Chinese New Year and continuation of the long weekend, extra-kitchen-time theme, I present Weekend Project Option Number Two -- jiao-zi. Say GEE OW ZE and you're not doing half bad pronouncing the word for the boiled dumplings eaten in northern China. In an online chat on washingtonpost.com a few years ago, Chinese cookbook author Grace Young mentioned that "jiao-zi are typically cooked between midnight and 2 am New Year's Eve, so it is believed that you bring your wealth from the previous year into the new year." Shaped like a coin or a gold or silver ingot to represent prosperity (or like...

 

By Kim ODonnel | February 16, 2007; 11:27 AM ET | Comments (0)

 

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