Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity
On Twitter: AdamKilgoreWP and PostSports  |  Facebook  |  E-mail alerts: Sports and Redskins  |  RSS

Adam Dunn goes to the videotape

Impressive what a pregame videotape session can do for a slumping slugger. That's all it took for Adam Dunn, who had gone 8 for 65 entering Saturday's game against St. Louis, to regain his powerful stroke.

Dunn worked with hitting coach Rick Eckstein while watching tape to correct what the first baseman called a "minor mechanical deal," and the result was a homer, a double and five RBI in a 14-5 victory tonight.

"I think [they] found a little something before the ballgame," Manager Jim Riggleman said. "They were talking about it in the video room, and they pointed it out, both of them with a very trained eye for details, found a little something that might have something to do with it, took it into batting practice. Adam told me after batting practice, 'I'm going to have a big day today.'"

Dunn's slump had covered the past 19 games, when he had just a .237 OBP during that stretch. Tonight, Dunn reached base three times in four plate appearances.

Dunn wasn't the only player with a big hitting night. Michael Morse had a career-high four hits, and Roger Bernadina and Willie Harris each had two RBI. Bernadina's came on his 10th home run.

"I wouldn't say I'm out of" a the slump, said Dunn, not wanting to take anything for granted.

Despite appearances to the contrary, Riggleman said the victory by no means felt secure after Dunn's homer. With Triple Crown candidate Albert Pujols in the lineup for the Cardinals, who are battling to make the postseason, a three-run lead isn't enough.

"It really wasn't comfortable," Riggleman said. "It's like [GM] Mike [Rizzo] and [team President] Stan [Kasten] were talking to me. It didn't feel like a 14-5 game. It was tight all the way. When [reliever Sean] Burnett was pitching to Pujols [in the seventh], it's a three-run lead, but he hit that ball right on the button, and Adam Kennedy hadn't played right, and we got a break right there, so it certainly didn't feel like 14-5."

By Gene Wang  |  August 28, 2010; 10:56 PM ET
Categories:  Adam Dunn  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Game 130 discussion thread: Cardinals at Nationals
Next: Two unusual calls don't faze Nationals

Comments

Oh my god, we got rid of Dribble and now Ray
Knight is telling us what great things he did
during his playing career. Where do they get
these guys from. Send Knight, Debbie Taylor to Harrisburg and let us watch the game in peace.

Posted by: wtait1212 | August 29, 2010 12:50 AM | Report abuse

I am ok with Knight but it really would be nice to have someone like Palmer who is not a homer and actually gives knowledge and insight into the game without blowing his own horn. That being said, the one person I can absolutely do without is Ms. Taylor. She is unbearable and adds nothing of value to the broadcast or postgame. I honestly switch channels when she comes on. Cannot understand why she is here.

Posted by: sjm3091 | August 29, 2010 1:00 AM | Report abuse

sjm3091: Debbie Taylor is here because her husband works in the scouting department (go figure) believe me bro i share your pain.Adam Dunn went to the videotape? really what made him do that? maybe the fact that he wasn't going to get that gazillion dollar free agent contract if he kept slumping .

Posted by: dargregmag | August 29, 2010 9:48 AM | Report abuse

Palmer? I don't think anyone has a bigger ego than him, maybe Don Sutton.

Also, I want my announcers to be homers.

Posted by: brothbart | August 29, 2010 11:45 AM | Report abuse

Post a Comment

We encourage users to analyze, comment on and even challenge washingtonpost.com's articles, blogs, reviews and multimedia features.

User reviews and comments that include profanity or personal attacks or other inappropriate comments or material will be removed from the site. Additionally, entries that are unsigned or contain "signatures" by someone other than the actual author will be removed. Finally, we will take steps to block users who violate any of our posting standards, terms of use or privacy policies or any other policies governing this site. Please review the full rules governing commentaries and discussions.




characters remaining

 
 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2010 The Washington Post Company