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Catching up with Stan Kasten on the Dominican issue, etc.

One of Stan Kasten's final missions as team president of the Nationals was assisting Major League Baseball in its ongoing effort to cleanse from the Dominican Republic corrupt practices in signing youthful players. Kasten and the Nationals, of course, became inextricably tied to the Dominican when the Smiley Gonzalez/Carlos Alvarez scandal broke during the spring of 2009.

Kasten worked closely with the task force for the Dominican appointed by the commissioner's office, which was led by long-time executive Sandy Alderson. Yesterday, Alderson was named the new general manager of the New York Mets, opening up a role in the league office to undertake a leadership role on the Dominican issue.

"I don't know yet" who will fill the position, Kasten said this afternoon. "I was just talking to a friend of mine who runs another team about that. I know it's a high priority for the commissioner's office. They've made great progress there. I'm sure they will continue. As much as I care about what happens in the Dominican, I'm really happy to see Sandy back running a team. It's a great spot for him. It's a great spot for the Mets. It's good news all the way around. We e-mailed back and forth last night."

In keeping with his personal policy, Kasten declined to speculate on any of his future career options when asked about the possibility of replacing Alderson in the league office. While he has invested much time in the Dominican issue and is passionate about, Kasten indicated he isn't currently apart of the league's Dominican efforts.

"My involvement is zero," Kasten said.

When Kasten left the Nationals at the end of the regular season, he said he would see through three objectives, one of which was the Nationals' legal fallout from their past connection in the Dominican corruption. Kasten offered no specifics but said the team is still hammering away at the problem.

"Our in-house counsel has been working on a number of things that we're still involved with down there," Kasten said. "We can't talk about it yet. I do hear from folks down there all the time. Several different things are at several different stages that I talked to Mike [Rizzo] about just last week."

As for Kasten's other two objectives -- finalizing the negotiations for radio rights and the future location for the Nationals' spring training headquarters -- he addressed both with one of his favorite phrases: "That's something you don't need to know about."

Overall, Kasten said, life after the Nationals has been "great." His daughter was married Sunday. He's been spending most of his time on the road, either meeting folks who want to talk about his future or making appearances and giving speeches.

"I'm having a blast," Kasten said.

By Adam Kilgore  | October 28, 2010; 4:15 PM ET
 
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Next: Adam Dunn will be a Type A free agent

Comments

Stan Kasten? That's something I don;t need to know about.

Posted by: dfh21 | October 28, 2010 4:27 PM | Report abuse

Are the Nats ready to start acting like they want to build a major league club? Kasten probably knows, but won't talk.

Posted by: EdDC | October 28, 2010 4:37 PM | Report abuse

MLB Trade Rumors has the official Elias Rankings. Adam Dunn is a Type A. Rizzo still should have traded him at the deadline.

Posted by: SpashCity | October 28, 2010 4:42 PM | Report abuse

Exactly, SplashCity. Wouldn't it be nice to have Dan Hudson, a better pitcher than any in the Nat's system this side of the Tommy Johns and this year's draft.

Posted by: jcampbell1 | October 28, 2010 5:14 PM | Report abuse

Thanks Spash, that's good news.

Posted by: Sunderland | October 28, 2010 5:21 PM | Report abuse

Please stay on top of the radio-rights story. It's an embarrassment how small a radius is that can hear the Nats w/o static or a satellite radio.

Posted by: Wooden_U_Lykteneau | October 28, 2010 5:26 PM | Report abuse

To fill in behind SplashCity, Here's the rundown on 1B & SP's (list is alphabetical).
1B - Type A
Dunn, Adam [WSH]
Konerko, Paul [CWS]
Lee, Derrek [ATL]
Type B
Berkman, Lance - Free Agent; option declined by NYY
LaRoche, Adam [AZ](has mutual option)
Pena, Carlos [TB]
SP - Type A
Arroyo, Bronson [CIN](has club option)
de la Rosa, Jorge [COL]
Lee, Cliff [TEX]
Pavano, Carl [MIN]
Pettitte, Andy [NYY]
Type B
Garland, Jon [SD](has mutual option)
Takahashi, Hisanori [NYM]
Vazquez, Javier [NYY]

Since WSH finished in the 'bottom 10', signing a Type A Free Agent would cost the team a 1st round supplemental pick, and their 2nd round pick (the 1st round pick is protected, based on finish), IIRC. Signing a Type B gives the team he was signed away from a 2nd round supplemental.


Posted by: BinM | October 28, 2010 5:44 PM | Report abuse

It would have been worse for the Nats had Dunn not attained Type A status, and it was a close call.

Rizzo not being able to move Dunn at the deadline makes me wonder whether he has the chops for this gig.

How this club, if it thinks it can get Pena, Lee, Konerko, Overbay, whomever, at a discount and use the extra coins for other needs in 2011, could not have found something it liked in return for Dunn in July, is a big mystery. Rizzo's explanation that there was not a deal he liked out there is weak. Rizzo telling the world he was not shopping Dunn, merely taking calls, makes me wonder -- why the Hell would he not be actively trying to move Dunn?

Now, if they re-ink Dunn, then they likely have missed their chance at the discount Dunn was willing to offer in March, and if they don't, then they missed out on MLB caliber talent for the guy in return that could have been here at the deadline. And they likely spent more money to be in a less advantageous position (could have saved big money on salary and on signing bonuses for the 2011 draftees.) Head-scratcher.

Posted by: dfh21 | October 28, 2010 6:05 PM | Report abuse

BinM's breakdown is not exactly right. Supplemental picks do not come from a club, they come from thin air. If a club loses the Type A or a Type B guy it is awarded a supplemental pick that is jammed in between the first and second rounds. The top 15 picks plus compensation picks from the prior year are proteced -- top 18 are protected this year (like when Crow did not sign the Nats' compensdation pick the next year became protected, there are simialr situations this year).

Posted by: dfh21 | October 28, 2010 6:19 PM | Report abuse

Never read a Kasten interview that conveyed any information other than he thinks he's really smart.

Posted by: markfromark | October 29, 2010 7:01 AM | Report abuse

Back in my days as a reporter, if someone told me "that's something you don't need to know about," I would answer, "you can decide what you want to tell me about, but I'll decide what I need to know about."

I hope that's what Adam told him.

Posted by: Meridian1 | October 29, 2010 1:48 PM | Report abuse

>"I'm having a blast," Kasten said.

StunK riding around the caribbean in his re-tooled all-electric vehicle searching to right the wrongs of Smiley Gonzalez.

Posted by: Brue | October 29, 2010 6:03 PM | Report abuse

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