Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity

Fetisov on Ovechkin's skill, toughness

It was a who's-who-in-Russian-hockey Sunday night in Vancouver as the very top people in the hierarchy of the sport visited the Winter Olympics. I ran into two of them outside Bosco Bar, which is an offshoot of the famous Russia House (a Russian headquarters at the Olympics, known for its wild nightlife) in downtown Vancouver.

First, I chatted with Slava Fetisov, a Hall-of-Famer and a former star of the Soviet national team, CSKA Moscow, the New Jersey Devils and the Detroit Red Wings. Fetisov has coached Team Russia to the 2002 Olympic bronze and is also a former Russian minister of sport. He is currently serving in the Russian Senate, the Federation Council.

"[Alex] Ovechkin is currently the most dangerous player in the world," said Fetisov. "He is out forward, someone who has come through the Russian school of hockey, and he always says that he is a graduate of our game. But there has never been a player like him in my time. He is a unique forward! He had other players, of a different style, who were also tough to stop. But never anyone like him."

When asked whether he could compare Ovechkin to anyone he has ever played against, Fetisov answered: "As far as playing one-on-one, he could be put on the same level as Mario Lemieux and Jaromir Jagr."

I also asked about Ovechkin's rough-em-up attutude at these Games and what Fetisov would have done in his best years if he saw Alex taking a run at him.

"Lots of different guys ran at me," said Fetisov. "I think, maybe, he wouldn't run quite as fast."

Later on, I met up with Alexander Medvedev, the boss of the KHL, the newly-minted Russian professional league. I asked Medvedev to address the fears of many North American fans that Ovechkin could take the money and run back to the homeland.

"No, he cannot," said Medvedev unequivocally. "If there is a mutual respect of contracts, nobody can run anywhere - in either direction. Alexander Radulov did leave with a working contract, but that was before the gentleman's agreement."

By Slava Malamud  |  February 22, 2010; 9:28 AM ET
Categories:  Alex Ovechkin , Ice hockey , Vancouver 2010  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Fairfax's Kohn gets 12th in 2-man bobsled
Next: Live Olympics chat with Lisa de Moraes and Scott Vogel

Comments

Wonder how much the contract incentive was for OV to smack jagr like that?

GIVE THAT MAN A RAISE TED!

Jagr that hit was from THOUSANDS of Caps.

Please come back to the NHL because we the Caps fans would to see you hit like that everynight.

Posted by: 1-20-09 | February 22, 2010 11:14 AM | Report abuse

That was a thing of beauty. Brought a tear to my eye...

Posted by: jmurray019 | February 22, 2010 11:25 AM | Report abuse

Slowly but surely we're exorcising all the ghosts of the past. The "HIT" was symbolic in many ways, not the least of which is the old, underachieving Caps are a thing of the past. Thanks Ovie!!!!

Posted by: epwolff | February 22, 2010 11:51 AM | Report abuse

All I could think of was... That one was for Ted, who brought Jagr here to score goals & all he did was take Teddy's money.

I wonder if he ever said... "Hey Ovie, don't do anything illegal, but if you get a clean shot at Jagr...."

Posted by: tony325 | February 22, 2010 1:27 PM | Report abuse

"...but that was before the gentleman's agreement."

Ominous.

Posted by: HughJassPhD | February 22, 2010 1:58 PM | Report abuse

great hit by Ovechkin, but it comes with several buts.

There is limited retaliation in this tournament, rosters don't have the enforcers. And Jagr isn't in the NHL, so there isn't any goon teammate of Jagr waiting to line up Ovechkin when he returns.

Plus, Jagr is 38. Not that Ovechkin shouldn't have hit the guy, but I don't think that hit happens if its jagr in his prime.

Posted by: zcezcest1 | February 22, 2010 2:25 PM | Report abuse

Now that was a hit to rival anything from the NFL. Wow! Even I stop up to cheer in my living room. And to top it off, Russia scored seconds after. Of course, after the game I wondered "Am I, an American, really cheering for the Russian team?"

Posted by: tundey | February 22, 2010 2:42 PM | Report abuse

I watched it live, that's was crazy.

I just went "Oh my!"

Then I realized it was Jagr and I just smiled some more. :)

- Ray

Posted by: rmcazz | February 22, 2010 2:51 PM | Report abuse

This is what is great about Ovechkin. He can do all the fancy finesse stuff that Crosby can do and then he can do this. Crosby would avoid conflict at any cost.

don't forget: Crosby is soft.

Posted by: DreamOutLoud | February 22, 2010 2:53 PM | Report abuse

great hit by Ovechkin, but it comes with several buts.

There is limited retaliation in this tournament, rosters don't have the enforcers. And Jagr isn't in the NHL, so there isn't any goon teammate of Jagr waiting to line up Ovechkin when he returns.

Plus, Jagr is 38. Not that Ovechkin shouldn't have hit the guy, but I don't think that hit happens if its jagr in his prime.

Posted by: zcezcest1

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

So Zcez...why would you suggest an enforcer need to retaliate on that hit..? It was CLEAN, it was solid (no elbows/knees), and even Jagr himself said he put himself in position to be crushed by Ovie, that is was HIS mistake totally.

Olympics or NHL...that hit is totally clean on a guy who was looking down after just dishing the puck.

In any league, Ovie makes that hit...on any guy, young or old, superstar or role player...that hit is a hockey play perfectly executed.

Hits like that are game changers, and are crucial to the flow of any level contact hockey game. Ovie just does it better than most.

Posted by: netminder71 | February 22, 2010 3:03 PM | Report abuse

Of course, after the game I wondered "Am I, an American, really cheering for the Russian team?"

Posted by: tundey | February 22, 2010 2:42 PM
_________________________

These are different players. Alex loves the game and he is unafraid to show it. The likes of the veterans of the 60s and 70s never smiled or showed emotion. For them it was labor.

Posted by: bs2004 | February 22, 2010 4:11 PM | Report abuse

YES. I am cheering the Russian team every day... until they meet the US, then we will have a different point of view.

Posted by: wp11234 | February 22, 2010 4:21 PM | Report abuse

don't forget: Crosby is soft.

Posted by: DreamOutLoud

********************

Yeah, that's why Team USA kicked his and Team Canada's rear ends in the Olympics last night.

Posted by: mssnatchquatch | February 22, 2010 4:24 PM | Report abuse

Yeah, Crosby is soft like the Stanley Cup. (*rolls eyes*)

Posted by: spunkydawg1 | February 22, 2010 4:34 PM | Report abuse

Do not forget Semin's great assist during that sequence! Wow!

Posted by: JohnWWW | February 23, 2010 9:21 AM | Report abuse

Funny how Milbury said, after Slovakia beat Russia, "Alex Ovechkin didn't get it done," but there was no "Crosby didn't get it done," after Canada lost, most of the blame was pushed to Brodeur. I hope Canada doesn't make the medal round so Milbury's annuerism will be shown live on international tv.

Posted by: ds_kelly | February 23, 2010 10:50 AM | Report abuse

Will it be bad if I laughed at Millbury when he's having his coronary on live tv when Canada loses? =/

Canada = the world's whipping boy of the 2010 Winter Olympics!

Go Team Russia! Go Team USA!

Posted by: LeftCoastCapsFan | February 23, 2010 11:11 AM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2010 The Washington Post Company