Take Our Daughters And Sons To Work(-Life Balance) Day

By Rebeldad Brian Reid

Today is Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day, which -- judging from the comments to last year's free-for-all posting on the topic -- is either a wonderful chance to give children some much needed perspective on their working parents or a day of headaches and lost productivity.

TODASTWD is supposed to be a celebration of labor, a kind of informational job fair for adolescents. The official Web site for the event talks about how the event helps "build their self-esteem" and allows children to "discover there are limitless opportunities."

But there's also a bit about helping kids "figure out how their future work, home, and community life fit together," but the site doesn't do into much detail about how TODASTWD is supposed to do that. Indeed, this blog is a testament to the fact that a huge number of adults have yet to figure out how their current work, home and community life fit together.

The fact that TODASTWD -- launched in 1993 as a daughters-only event -- now includes sons makes it even more important that balance be part of the open discussion of what work-life balance today looks like. I think it's vital that boys are brought early on into the discussion about the ways that work and family intersect for moms and dads, when they're less warped by assumptions about gender roles. And TODASTWD seems like as good an opportunity as any to kick start that discussion.

While the Wall Street Journal's Juggle blog is hosting a worthwhile discussion on how parents and kids can use the day to have heart-to-heart talks about work, I'm curious to know if there are any companies that see any value in broaching the subject of "how ... work, home, and community life fit together." Do any of you in TODASTWD-celebrating workplaces know if your agenda for the day includes any discussion of work-life balance?

Brian Reid writes about parenting and work-family balance. You can read his blog at rebeldad.com.

By Brian Reid |  April 26, 2007; 8:20 AM ET  | Category:  Workplaces
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Comments

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I remember taking my daughter to work about 15 years ago. She thought it was neat to get a day off from school. She also thought looking forward to working was stupid as most work she saw seemed rather boring (teaching, talking to students, meetings...)

Posted by: dotted | April 26, 2007 8:21 AM

Nope--not this time. They've been here before and they need to be in school!

*Off-topic alert!*

Jen--if you are reading here today, I thought of something that may provide your 4 yo with the best of both worlds. How about starting the kid with a mandolin? The stringing is the same as the violin (okay, it's double-stringed, but still) but it has two advantages for the beginning musician:

Frets
Easier to hold and play

www.mandolincafe.com

You CAN find nice little beetle-backs that aren't too dear. Don't let the afficianados and some outrageous prices scare you too badly.

They are lovely little instruments, and I'm kicking myself that I didn't think of it yesterday!

Posted by: Maryland Mother | April 26, 2007 8:27 AM

I actually just found out today that my firm doesn't do "Take Our Children to Work" day. This is a new experience for me, as in my previous life in a different city, it was a big deal. Full-day agenda, catered lunch, etc. I think it's good for children to see where parents work, but beyond that, I don't know how much value there is. Looking forward to today's blog to see how others feel.

Posted by: WorkingMomX | April 26, 2007 8:28 AM

Blow-off Day! Not that most of them aren't, but I've already taken the daughters, and it looks like I'm weasling out of this one this year because my annoying son just flat forgot or it was never mentioned at his school.

For those of you getting saddled, I suggest bringing in the gameboy, laptop and a few DBDs.

Posted by: Father of 4 | April 26, 2007 8:37 AM

*Another off-topic alert!*

Hi Dotted,

You mentioned the bass/cello issues at your home yesterday. Yesterday's anecdote was about getting kids to and from a county orchestra rehearsal, not the day-to-day lugging of instruments. It's weekly for us (kid & instrument to instructor).

Posted by: MdMother | April 26, 2007 8:42 AM

Hey MDMother-okay dokey. I thought it was day to day. Those with violins and violas have to lug every day to school (most kids are walkers to middle school around here), not that this is a real issue, but bass/cello are free free free most of the time! I do know the bass would probably not fit if I had a normal small sedan.

Posted by: dotted | April 26, 2007 8:53 AM

My son's elementary school is having a career day today. Different parents are coming in to tell/show the children what they do...and the kids have a chance to ask questions.

Posted by: program at school | April 26, 2007 9:01 AM

Frankly I think the program at school sounds a lot better than going to see what my dad the accountant does all day.

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 9:04 AM

My son's elementary school is having "wear pajammas to school day" today. So much better than hanging out at my or my wife's office.

Posted by: Arlington Dad | April 26, 2007 9:07 AM

thanks MD Mom! we love Dan Zanes CDs so that may be a perfect fit.

Posted by: Jen | April 26, 2007 9:08 AM

Why do the schools feel the need to have a a wear pajamas to school day? That sounds like a stupid distraction and waste of time. They don't have time for p.e. and music but they can do a p.j. day?

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 9:11 AM

Some ideas continue on despite the original purpose being accomplished or the purpose morphed into something else. I think that this is one of those ideas. I think this idea has run it course.

Posted by: Fred | April 26, 2007 9:11 AM

I beg of you: leave the kids in school that day. Do NOT bring them into work. No one will be able to get any work done if the kids are running around. PLEASE!

Posted by: Your co-worker | April 26, 2007 9:13 AM

Hi Jen,

Then you will LOVE the "Tone Poems" series. It has LOTS of lovely mandolins pieces.

Maybe a little hammer dulcimer? You can find some inexpensive beginner-type ones at Hearthsong (they are online) too. Or see what you local music store has available. I know you want the kid to enjoy making music, as well as appreciating what is heard. Making music is even more important than hearing it, actually. You get lots and lots of cross-connections going in the brain.

Honestly, you should see how many area light up during functional MRI's.

Let's hear it for the colours! (Yes, I know that has lots of "interesting" connotations for those of us of a "certain" age. Ahem.)

Have fun--remember that at 4, this is supposed to be FUN, not WORK. I know you know this, but sometimes it helps to have others saying it aloud. There are a lot of people who will suck the joy out of your life by trying to make everything some sort of contest. Try to avoid that quagmire.

Posted by: MdMother | April 26, 2007 9:16 AM

Career day sounds like a much better idea. I volunteered with our firm's TODASTWD a few years ago (before I had my little one), and was very frustrated by 1) the lack of interest on the part of the children and 2) the fact that some of the children were inappropriately young and I felt more like a babysitter than a volunteer.

Posted by: PLS | April 26, 2007 9:17 AM

"Why do the schools feel the need to have a a wear pajamas to school day? That sounds like a stupid distraction and waste of time. They don't have time for p.e. and music but they can do a p.j. day?"

This is Arlington couunty, my friend, we have p.e. and music classes -- and a student council that comes up with spirit days. You'd be surprised how excited a kid gets about wearing pjs to school. A minor distraction.

What activities and extras do they provide your Judgement County Public School System?

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 9:18 AM

09:18 AM - I'm just saying that all I hear from the public schools is about how they are soooo overwhelmed with the NCLB testing and no we can't have p.e. every day and no we can't have recess more than once a day because of all these requirements and then they spend time on "Spirit days" and seem to have time to support the local professional sports teams by making signs when they do well also. I can only imagine how long it takes to settle a class of second graders in their p.j's at school or on crazy hair day. I'm not against fun, I just think they could probably spend their time in better ways.

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 9:22 AM

my work makes it a big deal because they combine it with earth day. i do not bring my son to this because i think school is more important than this. i think a careers day at school is a better idea.

pajama day at my son's arlington county school. well, at my son's school this is combined with reading. you come to school in your jamies with your favorite book. the kids all hunker down in the cafeteria and read for 30 minutes. at least in his school it is combining the idea of fun & reading. don't know how your school does it. the day is eagerly looked forwarded to & there is much discussion on what book to bring.

Posted by: quark | April 26, 2007 9:26 AM

My agency has a big agenda planned for today. The program is limited to children in the ages of 8-13 years old. So they are not a real distraction from anyone else. Except seeing them in the cafeteria and the elevators, they are pretty much out of sight. There seems to be some hands on activities and a lot of presentations. I think it might give them a more global perspective of what the agency does but you would not really get an idea of what your parent does on a specific day. I did not see anything on work/life balance at all. I think career day is probably more informative and maybe a half day (at another time) to see what your parent actually does as more effective. My agency does have a volunteer program to go into schools to explain what the agency does. Today just seems like an expanded version of that. The kids do come away with some nice things: T-shirt, coffee mugs, and a few other trinkets. The kids seem to like it. I think more then once, it would get very old. It seems like the same program every year.

OT to educmom: I just wanted to take a few moments and explain to you that the statement you made about LD children and their parents wearing the label as a badge of honor is really not accurate for a lot of parents with LD children. Actually it is the opposite. Most of the kids in my daughter's preschool for developmentally delayed children have serious issues. We are not talking about the parents pushing for LD label to give them more time on the SAT or untimed test or AP classes with more service. These are kids who are speech delayed, downs syndrome, autism spectrum, trouble with fine or gross motor skills, cognitive delay or combinations of all of the above. I know for myself it was devastating to learn my child had LDs and was mildly on the autism spectrum. When your child is born, you have the same hopes and dreams of all parents. You believe your child might go to Harvard, become an athlete, or a doctor. To be told at 2 years old that your child has a significant speech delay is heart breaking. Watching a 2 year old get on a bus to go to preschool for three mornings a week is heart breaking. No child should have to do that. There is something wrong with needing car seats on school buses! Little kids like that should not be in school. But she has to be. Learning a year later that my daughter was on the autism spectrum was frightening and devastating all over again. Don't think for a moment that I wanted my child to be labeled as developmentally delayed or LD. I want so desparately for her to be average or main streamed. That is why I am doing all this early intervention. Some kids will never have hope to even be average (kids in wheel chairs, downs, etc...) At least with this extra early intervention, there is a real shot my kid will go to kindergarten main streamed with just pull out speech. I can't even imagine what it would be like to be told, sorry mam, your child will always have serious learning disabilities. I know what you were referring to. The people who want any academic edge for their child that they would be willing to manipulate the system to get a phoney LD label. But please that is not the majority of the kids and certainly not at the preschool level. Be grateful your kids are average. Some of us were not so lucky. Our kids have to struggle just to do what typical kids do naturally. Don't think for a minute I would not trade a typical development for a smaller class size. I would love to see my daughter thrive in a normal kindergarten setting, grab a hand of classmates and skip down the hall, and just be a typical kid. This is just food for thought from one mother. I am not one of those moms campaigning for LD rights. I just want my kid to have enough services so she can be typical (and frankly so she won't be a burden on society).

Posted by: foamgnome | April 26, 2007 9:28 AM

Dotted -- I remember those days of lugging a cello around. That was one of the main reasons I dropped it in 5th grade. (Not literally, of course, though that may have produced a satisfying and sonorous boom!)

Fred -- I agree with you that "take kids to work day" may no longer be meaningful. It made sense in the days when girls weren't expected to look forward to having careers. But now, kids of both genders have so much access to info everywhere about future jobs (love TLC's "Dirty Jobs"!), that bringing them in to work doesn't seem to make sense.

For what it's worth, I remember going to my dad's office when I was growing up. Boredom city. I'd either spend the day in an uncomfortable office chair with a book, or me and my sister would bug all the rest of the employees to death.

Posted by: NY Lurker | April 26, 2007 9:29 AM

9:22 -- sorry I forgot to sign my last post.

Well then, I guess we do have it pretty good in Arlington County (despite the tiny closets in our little pre-WWII houses). I hear none of this complaining from the school or our neighbors. Kids have PE twice a week and music class once a week.

So funny that you mention crazy hair day -- we've done that too! I chaperoned a field trip just this week, and I've seen the teacher in action. I'm certain that my son's teacher will be able to quickly take control of her class of kindergardeners in pjs.

Bottom line, pj day isn't worth criticizing.

Posted by: Arlington Dad | April 26, 2007 9:30 AM

((FG))

I have two words for you, Temple Grandin.

I am certain that your daughter will be the best person it is within her, and your, capabilities of creating and guiding her to become.

It'll be okay.

Want to plan on a Glen Echo trip? The siren song of the carousel is calling...

MdM

Posted by: MdMother | April 26, 2007 9:31 AM

Re: Violins, violas, cellos, bases

The cost for a minimumly, decen sounding stringed instrument begins around $2,000. If you are encouraging your kid to play competively; private lessons or auditioning for county/state orchestras, you may want to keep this in mind.

Posted by: Father of 4 | April 26, 2007 9:32 AM

*last one!*

For all cello players, current and former, go to youtube and look up "Pachebel's Rant". It's a scream.

My worksite combines BYKTWD with EarthDay too. But I prefer that they be at school. They've been here before on the occasional weekend. They know what I do, even if they can't see me doing it.

Posted by: MdMother | April 26, 2007 9:33 AM

MdMother: WE do need to do glen echo some time. Unfortunately we are booked through May. I will have to see how the summer plays out. I do want to take her sometime.

Posted by: foamgnome | April 26, 2007 9:35 AM

Okay, I lied.

Fo4:

You can rent them too. At least until you need a full-size cello, then you might as well buy one. The full-size rentals sound pretty cheesy. A lot of the stores do apply your rental fee to purchase. (Potter's and [memory lapse, starts with an L, has a store in Gaithersburg] do this anyway. Dale Music may do so as well, if you are in this area.)

Posted by: MdM | April 26, 2007 9:36 AM

If a lot of the kids are at work with mom or dad today, how many kids are in school? And what could the teacher possibly be teaching that won't need to be repeated for those that missed it? Just a thought.

Posted by: WDC | April 26, 2007 9:37 AM

Foamgnome or anyone who has experience with kids on the autism spectrum. I was watching an interview with the head of child development & psychiatry at NYU on treatment for kids on the spectrum. He said that the first two steps are behavior modification for the kids and working with the parents to try different parenting techniques. Is this the norm, or are most kids on the spectrum prescribed drugs initially? (Please note: I DO NOT have an opinion whether or not behavior modification/drugs/parenting/whatever can cure or treat kids on the spectrum - I have a friend whose child was recently diagnosed and I'm just trying to learn more about it. This is solely a request for information, not judgment in any way, shape or form). Thank you

Posted by: Question | April 26, 2007 9:45 AM

*shrug* My father is a doctor, and long before TYDTWD (or whatever that long-@ss acronym is), my Dad took me into the hospital and then his office one day when I was 8. Both because I'd expressed an interest, and I was a pretty well-behaved kid, and knew what would happen if I was disruptive ;) My Mom came and got me in the middle of the day so my Dad could finish up time with his patients and I wouldn't bug his partners, nurses and receptionists (most of whom I knew anyway).

When he was seeing patients at the hospital, I spent time in his in-house office, or in the Doctor's Lounge (both of which were a huge treat). Before he left the hospital for his office, he took me on a tour of the hospital, ending up in the labs (in retrospect, he was probably picking up a report), which was my favorite part of the day. I thought all the equipment was so cool. Dad actually lost me for a second because I was totally entranced by some sort of machine and was just standing there, staring.

My most vivid memory of the day though had NOTHING to do with work. He treated me to a doughnut in the cafeteria...and I wasn't supposed to tell Mom that a) he'd bought me a doughnut and b) that the lady behind the counter said "The usual one today, Dr. X?" :D (I never did tell Mom...)

Basically, if your child expresses an interest, encourage it and pick a quiet day at the office that makes sense for everyone. Otherwise, I think this is just a day that makes life difficult for everyone. You, your office mates, even your kids if they don't have an interest. Because invariably there's a big meeting or a deadline to be prepared for and it's just not a good time, you know?

I always thought you would be better off seeing what fields the kids ARE interested in and seeing if you can arrange some time in that kind of business.

Posted by: Chasmosaur | April 26, 2007 9:49 AM

Your co-worker: Thank you. You're absolutely right! One of my co-workers has 3 children under 10. Sometimes their babysitter will drop them off here when the babysitter has to go to an appointment or has an emergency, and they go home with their mother. Even for the few minutes in transition that they're here, the piercing screams and running in the halls are a major disruption to getting any work done, and very unprofessional. Frankly, I don't think this reflects badly on mom that she has to take off to be with her kids. I think it reflects badly on her that she has so little control over her kids. If it's this bad here, I can't imagine what it's like at home!

In any event, Bring Your Kid To Work Day was meant to introduce kids who are old enough to understand that one day, they'll have to get out and work for a living, and this is what it'll be like. It was never meant to be a showcase for your kids, or a babysitting service, or a "sit down and play with your Gameboy" experience.

Posted by: Keep the kids in school | April 26, 2007 9:56 AM

Question: I don't know what is the norm but in our case, our daughter has not been given any drugs. The only thing she does is go to an early intervention preschool through fairfax county. They provide speech therapy, gross and fine motor control therapy, behavioral therapy, and cognitive enrichment. It is a non categorical class for kids with at least two or more delays. In our case, our daughter has a significant speech and social interaction delay. She does NOT have any fine or gross motor skills delays or cognitive delays. It works like a typical preschool with circle time, reading, play time and extra therapy added in. That meets five mornings a week. Next September she will start the full day program but will move back to half days if that is appropriate. My daughter was 2 3/4 when she started the preschool. She was in just once a week speech from age 2- 2 3/4. She was only saying about 10 words when she first started preschool. Now in April she says well over a 100 words, says three full sentences, combines lots of 2 and 3 word sentences, and imitates lots of verbal expressions. She is just starting to socially interact with other children. She was only parallel playing before hand. She makes eye contact more consistently now. She was always making some eye contact before her diagnoses. Now it is just more often. But she was diagnosed with mild or high functioning autism due to the speech delay, lack of eye contact, and only parallel playing. She does not display any of the other "typical" autistic traits-like singular focus, flapping, repetitive behaviors, lack of imagination etc... I know other kids who have the same HFA diagnoses and don't utter a single word. So the problem with autism is that it is a spectrum disorder. Meaning that the symptoms can range from very mild (like my daughter) to extremely serious (standing in the corner spinning plates and banging your head against the wall). Also the response to treatment varies by individuals. One of the things that has helped my daughter with sentence construction is showing her picture cards that represent different words. Like a separate card for each word in this sentence "I want milk please." She can then say the sentence and insert a different picture card and word for the different things she wants-like milk, chicken, candy etc... But my colleague's son with the same diagnoses a little older then DD, can not say a single word. He doesn't point to pictures and understand their meaning. He does respond to things like get me the cow toy. He will hand the appropraite toy but does not request a toy by pointing to its picture or saying the word. To be honest, the definition of autism has expanded so far to include things that we just considered socially awkward in the past. I do think with proper early intervention, my daughter will be just fine. She will most likely always be slightly quirky but she will go on to be employeable, loving, productive adult. She still has the same chance of going to college as other kids because she does not suffer any cognitive delays. I hope that answers your question. We are pretty new to this. DD was just diagnosed a few months ago. When she first started the program they just labeled her with speech delay.

Posted by: foamgnome | April 26, 2007 9:57 AM

jump the shark, Jump the Shark, JUMP THE SHARK!

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 10:01 AM

My husband always takes the kids to the Red Carpet Club when we fly. Sometimes I think that's our families "take your kid to work" day.

Hubby always seems so pleased when we're there. He leads the boys through the snack bar and is always sure they have the drink and snack they want. Then he snuggles into the cubicles they have, logs onto the Internet to get his email, and forgets they're there!

Posted by: RoseG | April 26, 2007 10:07 AM

Foamgnome, do you know about the Asperger Oasis website at
www.udel.edu/bkirby/asperger?
It's a great community for other families struggling with serious issues and provides wonderful support and advice. It was kind of a lifesaver for me back when one of my little aspies was a biter --talk about unkind comments from judgmental moms! It was amazing to be able to connect with other parents who had been through similar issues.
Also, lots of good advice for dealing with school systems and teachers!

Posted by: armchair Mom | April 26, 2007 10:09 AM

OT to foamgnome

None of my business, but if you don't mind answering, what prompted you to have your daughter tested for speech delay at two years old? My daughter didn't really talk much at all until she was well over three years old, but she was definitely not LD in any way and once she started talking, she progressed rapidly and soon was on track with other kids her age. She's grown now and has twin girls who were delayed in speaking just as she was, but are now little chatterboxes at age five. We didn't worry about them, because of my daughter's pattern, but I'm curious about your experience. I know many children begin speaking at about a year, but neither of mine did (my son was late, but not as late as my daughter).

Posted by: carrot | April 26, 2007 10:10 AM

armchairmom: I did not know about that. DD has a speech delay so she could not be labeled as aspergers. But they do believe as she ages, she will get an asperger's diagnosis. She does seem to have average to above average intelligence. But she does not display any aggressive tendencies. But I have read that is more a male aspergers then a female aspergers. She seems extremely passive just aloof. I will book mark that site right now.

Posted by: foamgnome | April 26, 2007 10:11 AM

OFF-TOPIC ALERT
Does anyone know of a way to find the boundaries of the public schools in the District? (I have found a way to figure out which public schools we are currently assigned to, but how do I figure out where to live if I want to be assigned to different ones?)
Thanks!

Posted by: thinking ahead | April 26, 2007 10:17 AM

carrot: No problem. The old standard was test them at age 3. But the new theory is early intervention. We actually started worrying around 18 months. And we attended a workshop on direct language for two year olds. We were told by Child Find that if at age 2 they did not meet the language milestone, to bring them in for testing. I think because she was in day care and her cousin spoke a lot, we were more aware that she was just a quiet child. She also did not mimic words at all at that age. She seemed almost non verbal. DH and his sister were also in extensive speech therapy for pronouciation through out elementary school. So there was some speech history. I know my friends in Canada still use the three year old standard rule. I do think my daughter would have spoken eventually but it helps that she got early speech intervention therapy. She is moving along normal speech development. Just a year later then the average kid. She started with single words, then combining two, three, and now sentences. Her first speech therapist actually wanted her tested for sensory integration because she does not like finger painting. Well, we then brought her back to child find and they ran the gamet of tests on her. At it is difficult to test a two year old. She came up as delayed in all major areas. Not that she is actually delayed in all areas but she just wasn't in the mood to do the tests that day. So she qualified for preschool. After being in the preschool for a few months, her teacher told me that she believed she might be on the autism spectrum based on only parallel playing and inconsistent eye contact. So we started having DD looked at by neurologists, developmental pediatricians, and the autism center. That is where she got her final diagnosis. But in short, they can only say that she does display some of the mild symptoms of autism. My friend's husband is a school psychologist and he words it like this. The doctors will only be able to tell you what you already know. DD is slightly off but she is NOT and will NEVER be rain man. She doesn't really fully fit an autism spectrum disorder but since she is most like that, she will be given that label. She will go through early intervention and will either be mainstreamed by kindergarten and be just like her typical peers or she will be mainstreamed some time in elementary school and be slightly quirky. We will have no idea if she actually had autism or that the early intervention worked so well, she is essentially indistinguisable from her typical peers.

Posted by: foamgnome | April 26, 2007 10:20 AM

I don't know about MD and VA, but in PA every child can be assessed at the parent's request even at 18 mos. for all kids of developmental delays at no cost. You can start with your public school to find out about who to contact. Two of my neighbors have done so.

Posted by: moxiemom | April 26, 2007 10:36 AM

moxiemom: I was told by Child Find in VA that they had to be two. To the day. You have to bring their birth certificate to prove they are at least age 2. I got my daughter in three days after her second birthday.

Posted by: foamgnome | April 26, 2007 10:40 AM

http://www.fcps.edu/ss/preschool/chfdinfo.htm

OK, their website says 20 months. But I know when they call at 20 months for speech, they just put you in the work shop. They won't actually test them till 2 years of age.

Posted by: foamgnome | April 26, 2007 10:42 AM

I got taken to work with my mother twice a week up until I began kindergarten, but out of necessity rather than any political agenda.

For years my mother worked as the part-time clerk for a two-man sheet-metal shop; she handled all their correspondence, bookkeeping, etc. One of the owners was the uncle of her longtime best friend, so my mother had gotten more or less drafted into the job because the uncle knew she'd be good at it and she was a known quantity, as it were. After my mother had me, the arrangement became that the friend's uncle would pick my mother and me (and my stroller, or later a portable playpen) and whatever other toys, equipment and supplies were necessary for me to stay at the office all day. At lunch the uncle brought in take-out deli food; I still recall grated carrot salad, oatmeal cookies, and sip of Coca-Cola from my mother's glass (we almost never had soft drinks at home). I don't remember very well how I spent the time while my mother worked, except that she brought along toys for me to play with. At the risk of revealing my age, I was utterly spellbound whenever my mother worked on the Comptometer. Aside to Foamgnome: I think that's where my love of numbers began!

Posted by: catlady | April 26, 2007 10:45 AM

OK, I have to ask. What is a comptometer?

Posted by: foamgnome | April 26, 2007 10:47 AM

Foamgnome, I'll see if I can Google up an image of a Comptometer to link for you. Trust me, they were awesome!

Posted by: catlady | April 26, 2007 10:49 AM

I just googled comptometer myself. I remember seeing these around way way back, but I don't know if they were actually used or just historical. I worked at Burroughs in the mid 70s (Burroughs also made them)

Posted by: dotted | April 26, 2007 10:51 AM

I can always count on this crowd to come up with a more interesting, more educational topic than whatever Brian tees up. Thanks to foamgnome et al.

Posted by: Megan's Neighbor | April 26, 2007 10:52 AM

found it on the web. Yes, it does seem fascinating.

Posted by: foamgnome | April 26, 2007 10:52 AM

A Comptometer was an early adding machine, whose buttons I found mesmerizing.

Images of all sorts of Comptometers:
http://images.google.com/images?hl=en&gbv=2&q=Comptometer&btnG=Search&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&um=1&sa=N&tab=wi

History of Comptometers:
http://members.cruzio.com/~vagabond/ComptHome.html

Posted by: catlady | April 26, 2007 10:54 AM

"Basically, if your child expresses an interest, encourage it and pick a quiet day at the office that makes sense for everyone. Otherwise, I think this is just a day that makes life difficult for everyone"

Many people work at places where you are not allowed to bring children, except for this one day per year. Sometimes it is for security reasons, others for insurance reasons. My husband and I can only show our children what we do one day per year. I hope that is not taken away. It is not overly disruptive as age guidelines of 9-15 are strictly enforced.

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 10:56 AM

"I can always count on this crowd to come up with a more interesting, more educational topic than whatever Brian tees up. Thanks to foamgnome et al."

No offense to foamgnome, but not everyone is interested in autism and LD.

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 10:57 AM

10:57: No offense taken. I just brought it up in response to educmom's comment yesterday about LDs.

Posted by: foamgnome | April 26, 2007 10:58 AM

OT: in the spirit of the comptometer, anyone else have a digicomp back in the mid 60s? It was a mechanical built with plastic and rubber bands (added binary, not decimal).

http://www.retrothing.com/2006/02/build_your_own_.html is a picture

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 10:59 AM

On this blog, the word "work" appears in conjunction with "daughter", "son", "father", and "mother" for the number of posts as depicted by the following table:

1132 Daughter
1020 Son
3008 Mother or Mom
1428 Father or Dad

I'm open for a requests or two today.

Posted by: Blog Stats | April 26, 2007 11:00 AM

10:57 clearly not everyone is interested in bysdtwd and life balance either. If you have something more exciting to discuss, I'm game. I was just thinking about how very much I love warm, clean sheets.

Posted by: moxiemom | April 26, 2007 11:03 AM

I think this is a great idea. But I do believe parents should use proper judgment when considering this. If a child is mature enough, then they will most likely benefit from a lot more than just getting out of school for the day.

Also, I think an minimum age requirement should be imposed on this. Bringing a 2-year old to work for the purpose of this day really isn't going to do much more than create lost productivity. I think a certain level of cognition needs to be attained for that.

Posted by: JRS | April 26, 2007 11:03 AM

Does anyone on here have experience with adult ADD. I just got diagnosed and have a prescription for ritalin which I haven't started taking yet.

Posted by: Yikes | April 26, 2007 11:03 AM

Does anyone on here have experience with adult ADD. I just got diagnosed and have a prescription for ritalin which I haven't started taking yet.

Posted by: Yikes | April 26, 2007 11:03 AM

Yes. What's your question / concern?

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 11:05 AM

Yikes:

My husband was diagnosed with ADD in his late teens. Not sure why, but he was never medicated. (I think it was because his mother thought he could control it on his own...)

Anyway, I have no direct experience with an adult having ADD, and on meds. But I can tell you I have heard that Ritalin can sometimes cause the opposite effect in adults (greater excitability, mood swings, depression).

I think my husband has a milder form of it. He mostly just needs to be reminded about things, because he will forget easily, and often. I don't get mad at him anymore for leaving the lights on!

Posted by: JRS | April 26, 2007 11:08 AM

I want to know about side affects and what it's like to be on ritalin, I guess. I'm kind of scared (but I need something to help me, I'm so distracted.)

Posted by: Yikes | April 26, 2007 11:09 AM

10:56 wrote: "My husband and I can only show our children what we do one day per year. I hope that is not taken away. It is not overly disruptive as age guidelines of 9-15 are strictly enforced."

This illustrates an excellent point: different approaches are appropriate for different situations. We need to respect this fact. Some posters tend to assume the OSFA [one-size-fits-all] posture, limited to their personal experience, when in fact the world of work is varied, so what's best in one case might not be in another.

Posted by: catlady | April 26, 2007 11:09 AM

This blog will be completely off topic by the 100th post. If not sooner. This topic is a goner

Posted by: pATRICK | April 26, 2007 11:12 AM

"This blog will be completely off topic by the 100th post. If not sooner. This topic is a goner"

LOL - Maybe the people interested in this topic don't want to blog from work while their children are with them.

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 11:14 AM

"LOL - Maybe the people interested in this topic don't want to blog from work while their children are with them. "


What does your daddy/mommy do? They blog their opinions to strangers- Now that is funny!

Posted by: pATRICK | April 26, 2007 11:17 AM

pATRICK - When you're strange, faces come out of the rain

sing along!

Posted by: dotted | April 26, 2007 11:23 AM

Blog Stats, Can you present more information such as the contexts in which the words you count appear? That way they'd be more meaningful.

Posted by: catlady | April 26, 2007 11:24 AM

Here's an interesting topic. Not at all related to work/life balance, but an interesting topic. Lots of smart, thoughtful people here I'd love to hear the opinions out there.

By Elizabeth Cohen
CNN

AUSTIN, Texas (CNN) -- When Emilio Gonzales lies in his mother's arms, sometimes he'll make a facial expression that his mother says is a smile.

But the nurse who's standing right next to her thinks he's grimacing in pain.

Which one it is -- an expression of happiness or of suffering -- is a crucial point in an ethical debate that has pitted the mother of a dying child against a children's hospital, and medical ethicists against each other. (Watch more on the battle over Emilio. Video )

Emilio is 17 months old and has a rare genetic disorder that's ravaging his central nervous system. He cannot see, speak, or eat. A ventilator breathes for him in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit at Austin Children's Hospital, where he's been since December. Without the ventilator, Emilio would die within hours.

The hospital contends that keeping Emilio alive on a ventilator is painful for the toddler and useless against his illness -- Leigh's disease, a rare degenerative disorder that has no cure.

Under Texas law, Children's has the right to withdraw life support if medical experts deem it medically inappropriate.

Emilio's mother, Catarina Gonzales, on the other hand, is fighting to keep her son on the ventilator, allowing him to die "naturally, the way God intended."

The two sides have been in and out of courts, with the next hearing scheduled for May 8.

The case, and the Texas law, have divided medical ethicists. Art Caplan, an ethicist at the University of Pennsylvania, supports the Texas law giving the hospital the right to make life or death decisions even if the family disagrees. "There are occasions when family members just don't get it right," he said. "No parent should have the right to cause suffering to a kid in a futile situation."

But Dr. Lainie Ross, a pediatrician and medical ethicist at the University of Chicago, says she thinks Emilio's mother, not the doctors, should be able to decide whether Emilio's life is worth living. "Who am I to judge what's a good quality of life?" she said. "If this were my kid, I'd have pulled the ventilator months ago, but this isn't my kid."

The law, signed in 1999 by then-Gov. George W. Bush, gives Texas hospitals the authority to stop treatment if doctors say the treatment is "inappropriate" -- even if the family wants the medical care to continue. The statute was inspired by a growing debate in medical and legal communities over when to declare medical treatment futile.

Dr. Ross says that under the law, some dozen times hospitals have pulled the plug against the family's wishes. She says more often than not, the law is used against poor families. "The law is going to be used more commonly against poor, vulnerable populations. If this family could pay for a nurse to take care of the boy at home, we wouldn't be having this conversation," she said.

Emilio is on Medicaid, which usually doesn't pay for all hospital charges. The hospital's spokesman said that he doesn't know how much it's costing the hospital to keep Emilio alive, but that cost was not a consideration in the hospital's decision.

"[Our medical treatments] are inflicting suffering," said Michael Regier, senior vice president for legal affairs and general counsel for the Seton Family of Hospitals, of which Austin Children's is a member. "We are inflicting harm on this child. And it's harm that is without a corresponding medical benefit."

"It's one thing to harm a child and know this is something I can cure," he added. "But that's not the case here." Regier says Emilio is unaware of his surroundings, and grimaces in pain. He said the ventilator tube down his throat is painful, as is a therapy in which hospital staff beat on his chest to loosen thick secretions.

But Gonzales says her son is on heavy doses of morphine and not in pain. She said her son does react to her. "I put my finger in his hand, and I'm talking to him, and he'll squeeze it," she says. "Then he'll open his eyes and look at me."

Gonzales said she'll continue to fight for treatment for her son. "I love my kid so much, I have to fight for him," she said. "That's your job -- you fight for your son or your daughter. You don't let nobody push you around or make decisions for you."

Elizabeth Cohen is a CNN Medical News correspondent. Senior producer Jennifer Pifer contributed to this report.

Posted by: moxiemom | April 26, 2007 11:29 AM

Comptometers weren't the only machines to have that kind of numerical keyboard. Some models of cash registers had columns of buttons to be pushed to indicate the price of each item. Then the clerk would push the "Total" button, a bell rang, the total appeared and the cash drawer opened. I wonder if this was the derivation of the expresion "to ring up" a purchase.

Posted by: catlady | April 26, 2007 11:33 AM

The Doors! much better to have this run thru my head all day rather than John whatishisanme Chicago?

Posted by: Fred | April 26, 2007 11:34 AM

Off-TOPIC response:

I want to know about side affects and what it's like to be on ritalin, I guess. I'm kind of scared (but I need something to help me, I'm so distracted.)

Posted by: Yikes | April 26, 2007 11:09 AM

www.chadd.org is your first and best initial resource for all things ADD.

It's not good to be scared, but it is good to be getting assistance with an issue that, left unaddressed, ruins many marriages and careers, and has a high correlation to substance abuse and depression.

Work with your physician, or find one who has experience with adults with ADD - not just kids -- and in whom you have confidence. Many physicians initially prescribe Ritalin for every Adult ADD patient, expecting that the patient will communicate about side effects and that the initial prescription has no more significance than a starting point. Generally, physicians also start with a dosage that is so low it is one step above useless, again relying on the patient to return and ask for an increased dose. Stimulant meds don't stay in your system so there are no long-term effects, but patients often report the side effects while taking them. The most common side effects for the class of stimulant meds, of which Ritalin (methylphenidate) is only one, are appetite suppression, sleep difficulty, rebound emotions, and headaches.

You should see a notable difference in focus and short-term memory even on Day 1. If you don't like Ritalin, ask to try Adderall (amphetamine-based) or a non-stimulant med, e.g., Straterra. Try an extended release as well as not-extended release. One will work better for you than the other. (In our family, we would be trying to find the prescription bottle all day long if we didn't take XR). If you don't like any meds, look for adult-targetted behavior modification groups in your area which may assist with some of the organizational problems, and will also make you feel less stupid, lazy, forgettful, disorganized, or any of the other things you've heard before.

If you, like me, are mostly afraid of what you don't understand, read a couple of good books on adult ADD, like Finding Your Focus by Judith Greenbaum.

Also, most experts in this area suspect a strong hereditary link. Look at your parents, look at your children, educate yourself and have compassion.

Posted by: Megan's Neighbor | April 26, 2007 11:34 AM

I was getting a blood draw at the endocronologist today, and the doc's son was there, observing, while the nurse explained all that she was doing, why she chose a certain needle, why the blood was moving so slow, etc. I thought it was pretty neat -- seemed like he was interested and actually learning something! (They asked my permission for him to be there during the draw, of course).

Posted by: writing mommy | April 26, 2007 11:34 AM

Treatment implies chance of improvement.

So his mother is prolonging his existence, and in the meanwhile, having to be on powerful painkillers, to have people beat on your little chest to loosen the mucus so the ventilator can continue to breathe for you, well, it strikes me as being cruel.

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 11:37 AM

The blog is boring
The blog is old
Can we have something
that would hold
Our interest today
and not be told
that statistics don't lie
but just lead us astray

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 11:37 AM

11:37, can you come up with a topic that connect poetry and balance?

What about, how do you introduce and develop and interest in culture to your kids without driving all the other art / opera / theater lovers nuts?

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 11:42 AM

There's also palliation of symptoms, so the patient is more comfortable while awaiting death. (In a way, all of life is like that)

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 11:42 AM

OT response to moxiemom's posting - the thing I found wierd about that article was "Emilio's mother, Catarina Gonzales, on the other hand, is fighting to keep her son on the ventilator, allowing him to die 'naturally, the way God intended.'" Well, if she wants him to die naturally, wouldn't she want him to live naturally - i.e. - without a ventilator? Without the UNnatural machinery of the ventilator, he would have passed peacefully probably quite some time ago.

Posted by: texas response | April 26, 2007 11:43 AM

Thank you, Megan's Neighbor. That's very helpful. I have to try something. My performance at my job is really being impacted by my inability to concentrate on anything. And God knows the internet doesn't help.

Posted by: Yikes | April 26, 2007 11:43 AM

The topic is boring
The topic has mold
What would you choose
If you were so bold?

16 and smoking
but 42 and old
What would you do
If you could be told
that you can make it over
and not be so old, old

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 11:43 AM

She says more often than not, the law is used against poor families. "The law is going to be used more commonly against poor, vulnerable populations. If this family could pay for a nurse to take care of the boy at home, we wouldn't be having this conversation," she said.

So, which is it? Is that law actually used more often against poor families, or is it only that the law has the potential to disadvantage poor families?

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 11:44 AM

to anon at 11:37 - may I suggest singing/humming The Doors songs? With apologies to some, I'd rather humm Doors than John Denver

Posted by: dotted | April 26, 2007 11:45 AM

Catlady, I don't count word frequencies. I count the number of individual posts where the words appear.

For example, if a single post contained both the words "work" and "daughter", it would count as 1 for the "daughter" column. If the post also contained the word "son", it would also be counted in the "son" column too.

Does this answer your question?

Posted by: Blog Stats | April 26, 2007 11:46 AM

Treatment? That's not treatment. The mom is not 'fighting for treatment' for her child, as there is no treatment. Think how many other lives the hospital could save with the money being spent on this child.

It is horrible, but it sounds like this child will never leave the hospital. So this mom should get on with her life and face the facts.

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 11:47 AM

Hmm, I naturally lean towards the parents as final arbiters but she does seem to be in denial. I disagree with her but she will need to make that choice not bureaucrats.

Posted by: pATRICK | April 26, 2007 11:48 AM

Texas response - the irony of "naturally, the way God intended." and the use of ventilator also struck me.

Posted by: Divorced mom of 1 | April 26, 2007 11:50 AM

Texas response - the irony of "naturally, the way God intended." and the use of ventilator also struck me."


Seems like schiavo (sp?) all over again

Posted by: pATRICK | April 26, 2007 11:51 AM

Emilio's mother, Catarina Gonzales, on the other hand, is fighting to keep her son on the ventilator, allowing him to die "naturally, the way God intended."

I didn't know that ventilators were birthed. However did I miss that?

Seems to me that God created that child to die much more rapidly than Mom would like. Which is sad, but she can't have it both ways.

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 11:51 AM

Blog Stats, my interest is in the CONTEXT of their usage. What topics were being discussed in which the words arose, and were the connotations positive or negative?

Posted by: catlady | April 26, 2007 11:52 AM

What about, how do you introduce and develop and interest in culture to your kids without driving all the other art / opera / theater lovers nuts?

Posted by: | April 26, 2007 11:42 AM

Easy, Just start the child watching the Moonlighting episode on Shakespeare.
The title is "Atomic Shakespeare."

Posted by: 11:37 | April 26, 2007 11:53 AM

Moxiemom, that situation with the little boy in Texas is heartbreaking. I do, however, think that the doctors who are attending know better than the mother and that they should stop trying to keep this child alive. I felt the same way in the Schiavo case. Sometimes, a terrible and horrifyingly hard decision has to be made based on what's best for the person who's terminally ill/in a vegetative state -- not what's best for those who will mourn when the person is gone.

Foamgnome, I liked your post about LD children this morning. I agree with you that it's not a badge of honor you wear. My very dear friend has two children who are LD (one severely) and I am in awe of how she constantly has to advocate for them as they go through school and life. More power to you.

Posted by: WorkingMomX | April 26, 2007 11:54 AM

Does anyone have a mortgage lender they can recommend for someone with less than stellar credit? I live in Maryland.

Posted by: HomeBuyer | April 26, 2007 11:54 AM

Dotted,
have you tried the almonds yet?

Posted by: KLB SS MD | April 26, 2007 11:57 AM

Does anyone have a mortgage lender they can recommend for someone with less than stellar credit? I live in Maryland.

Posted by: HomeBuyer | April 26, 2007 11:54 AM

Has the blog jumped the shark to this extent?

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 11:58 AM

Off-TOPIC Alert

Yikes, glad to assist. Candidly, my marriage almost broke up over this, before we knew what the source of the problem was and how to get the right kind of assistance. I suspect the more you delve into this, you'll find it impacts relationship and more life-areas than your job. I agree, the Internet most certainly does not help with at-work focus. :>)

anon at 11:53 - what a great suggestion! thanks.

Posted by: Megan's Neighbor | April 26, 2007 12:03 PM

Catlady, the data is derived from all posts submitted to the onbalance blog since its inception back in March 2006. I cannot interpret connotations since doing so requires human judgement.

Posted by: Blog Stats | April 26, 2007 12:03 PM

moxiemom - I made that decision.

I think the parents have to live with whatever decision they make and society should help them both understand the exact situation in all its facets, and then support them whatever they decide.

Posted by: Shandra | April 26, 2007 12:03 PM

I guess I find the TX situation so very sad, but I'm leery of medical professionals overriding parental requests. The fact that the hospital is so adamant about this when they so frequently override DNR requests in hospitals seems inconsistent. I think I know what I'd do in that situation, but I know that I wouldn't want someone making it for me. Tough deal.

Posted by: moxiemom | April 26, 2007 12:03 PM

11:42 asked: What about, how do you introduce and develop and interest in culture to your kids without driving all the other art / opera / theater lovers nuts?

Do your local symphonies, opera and theater companies offer special performances or series for young people? When I was a child my parents encouraged me to attend such programs, which are designed to suit their young audiences' interests, level of attention, etc.

Posted by: catlady | April 26, 2007 12:05 PM

Ugh! I hate today--it's an excuse for all the parents to blow-off their work and have their spawn annoy the rest of us. When can I bring my dog into work, huh?

Posted by: Phillyfilly | April 26, 2007 12:07 PM

Many parents in my department bring their children to work at various times throughout the year. We also have a daycare center on campus and several student groups (elementary through high school) that tour our lab. Kids love it here--we have cool fish with no eyes, a huge aquarium, and lots of forbidding-looking machines that make noise. I can see how a kid would like to tour our facility. However, if I worked at a more conservative place, like an accounting or law firm, I wouldn't bother. Young kids can't understand the nuances of work whose importance is more subtle than "Cool! Those fish don't have eyes!" For high school students, however, I think almost any workplace could be beneficial. And I agree with the posters who've said it's all but impossible to get work done with kids running around everywhere. That rings true even in my workplace, which is slightly more kid-friendly than conventional businesses.

Posted by: Mona | April 26, 2007 12:09 PM

moxiemom, I agree with your 12:03 post. I resist the attitude that doctors and hospitals always know best, e.g., the God Syndrome.

I am concerned though that, as a country, we are unwilling to make any value judgments about health care. We cannot meet the medical needs of every single person. Care for premature children and the elderly at the end of life is eating up a substantial amount of the pie and forcing premiums to sky-rocket. We can continue to put our heads in the sand, but all that plan is doing is forcing persons between 5 and 50 to go uninsured because they either don't have access to health insurance or it is not affordable. I don't have solution to propose, but wish we could engage on the topic in a more honest manner.

Posted by: Megan's Neighbor | April 26, 2007 12:09 PM

Meesh -- do you work at SAS? :)

Posted by: WorkingMomX | April 26, 2007 12:11 PM

"have their spawn annoy the rest of us..."

Yes, I did bring in my goldfish today!

Posted by: Fred | April 26, 2007 12:11 PM

"how do you introduce and develop and interest in culture to your kids without driving all the other art / opera / theater lovers
nuts?"

Take them to the high school band concerts and plays.

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 12:14 PM

Oh, did you want a serious answer?

Posted by: 11:37 | April 26, 2007 12:16 PM

Shark Jumping commenced with the second comment of the day. Where have you been?

Posted by: to 11:58 | April 26, 2007 12:18 PM

I'd consider that a carry-over topic from yesterday rather than a true Shark Jump. 9:45 marks the jump.

Posted by: to 12:18 | April 26, 2007 12:20 PM

I just got caught up... as far as pulling people off life support- bad idea. They just ran a special about this guy who woke up after 19 years. Sadly, he was 19 at the time he fathered a child and he and his daughter are the same age mentally... talk about weird in a bad way.

Evidently, surprise surprise, the brain can slowly heal itself. While this guy may not ever get a normal life back, he is still alive and able to talk and move with assistance. On that note, I think that in addition to basic life support, muscles should be stimulated often enough so they do not atrophy. In the event that a patient does regain consciousness they will cut their recovery time, and be healthier!

Posted by: Chris | April 26, 2007 12:22 PM

Leigh's disease, a rare degenerative disorder that has no cure.

Emilio is 17 months old and has a rare genetic disorder that's ravaging his central nervous system. He cannot see, speak, or eat. A ventilator breathes for him in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit at Austin Children's Hospital, where he's been since December. Without the ventilator, Emilio would die within hours.


Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 12:26 PM

Sorry, forgot to post my name

Posted by: stem-cell research is never acceptable | April 26, 2007 12:27 PM

In other words, Chris, one approach does not apply to all persons on ventilators and other life-support systems.

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 12:28 PM

Sorry, forgot to post my name

Posted by: stem-cell research is never acceptable | April 26, 2007 12:27 PM

Right. Whatever.

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 12:34 PM

Any time you are concerned about a child's speech and language development, you can have an evaluation. There are several tests which we can use for very young infants. In my experience, we haven't usually started direct therapy until about 18 months, but some children younger than that have had re-evaluations every few times to monitor their development.

Posted by: Speech Girl | April 26, 2007 12:36 PM

No, WorkingMomX, I don't work at SAS, but I did apply there and at RTI. I'd be happy to work at either place because of the stellar benefits, onsite gyms, and delis and stuff, but it was not meant to be. So I work somewhere else in Durham that also uses an acronym for its title...

Do you work at SAS?

Posted by: Meesh | April 26, 2007 12:37 PM

Shandra - I am so sorry that happened to you and your child. I cannot even begin to imagine the depth of your pain.

Megan's neighbor - I agree with you and share your concern. Sometimes I'm overwhelmed by the amount of money being spent on keeping a 90 year old breathing while a 10 year old has to have a fundraiser for a bone marrow transplant. However, its easy to feel that way when the 90 year old isn't your 90 year old. Everyone's feelings on this issue are so scattered both personally and on the spiritual side that its hard to draw a line. Some people want every second of life that is coming to them whatever form it takes and others only want the time that they consider to be of value.

That said, I'm loathe to let the gov't in here. I don't like abortion, it is not a choice I would make, but I don't want the gov't telling me that I don't have the right to make that choice. I also think we should legalize physician assisted suicide. Then again, maybe I just don't want to be told what to do.

Posted by: moxiemom | April 26, 2007 12:38 PM

stem-cell research is never acceptable | April 26, 2007 12:27 PM

Right. Whatever.

Posted by: | April 26, 2007 12:34 PM

And you are whom?

Posted by: scrina | April 26, 2007 12:40 PM

Whoops, I think I meant "Mona" -- not Meesh. Sorry for the confusion . . .

I don't work at SAS, either, Meesh!

Posted by: WorkingMomX | April 26, 2007 12:41 PM

Sometimes I'm overwhelmed by the amount of money being spent on keeping a 90 year old breathing while a 10 year old has to have a fundraiser for a bone marrow transplant.

And best of all, the 90 year old gets to tap into medicaid and medicare so YOU get to pay for it. Meanwhile, the 10 year old's family is trying to pay for it mostly out-of-pocket, because their health insurer (if they have one), refuses to pony up the money.

Let's see, who is apt to live longer in the event of a successful surgery or treatment? A 90 year old or a 10 year old?

Posted by: JRH | April 26, 2007 12:43 PM

"stem-cell research is never acceptable"

Never? Not even in the case of regenerating cells for cancer patients? What about other diseases?

Should we also get rid of clinical trials?

Posted by: Devi's Advocate | April 26, 2007 12:46 PM

have their spawn annoy the rest of us

what a b*tch

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 12:47 PM

Sorry, forgot to post my name

Posted by: stem-cell research is never acceptable | April 26, 2007 12:27 PM

Right. Whatever.

Posted by: | April 26, 2007 12:34 PM

And you are whom?

Posted by: scrina | April 26, 2007 12:40 PM

I cannot imagine why you'd care, scrina, but I am a person who prefers the jokes of adults to those of juveniles.

Posted by: to scrina | April 26, 2007 12:50 PM

Shark Jumping commenced with the second comment of the day. Where have you been?

Posted by: to 11:58 | April 26, 2007 12:18 PM

I'd consider that a carry-over topic from yesterday rather than a true Shark Jump. 9:45 marks the jump.

Posted by: to 12:18 | April 26, 2007 12:20 PM


OK, shark hopping began with the second comment, jumping at 9:45.

Posted by: to 11:58 | April 26, 2007 12:54 PM

I think that the people who don't want stem cell research are the ones whose relatives do not have a debilitating disease.

It's like the stars who don't care about a disease until they get it.

Posted by: scarry | April 26, 2007 12:56 PM

What about adult stem cells?

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 12:57 PM

Thanks, JRH and moxiemom, those are the issues of which I am thinking. I am opposed to the government or an individual hospital deciding, but the average person seems to think we can solve the healthcare issue without asking these sorts of questions or making some tough policy decisions. I no longer think we can.

Posted by: Megan's Neighbor | April 26, 2007 12:57 PM

Catlady, a local theater has performances for kids- I took my ds to see go dog go not long ago. And another theater does shortened ballets for little ones too. So we do those kinds of things.

Moxiemom- it is a sad day when the supreme court is deciding which medical procedure is legal and which is not. What's next for that? Do they get to decide which type of procedure I would get after a heart attack? No one but drs and patients should decide about a medical procedure. My 2 cents.

Posted by: atlmom | April 26, 2007 1:00 PM

Scarry, I agree with you. Many of these decisions seem clear and reasonable until it affects you personally. I could absolutely argue that we should not be providing extraordinary care for nonagenarians especially those who have lost all reasonable quality of life, yadda, yadda, yadda.... until that nonagenarian is my dad and I'm pretty certain I might feel at least a little differently about it. I might still not want to go crazy with the treatment, but I don't think I would be so adamant about it and the reasoning wouldn't be economic, but purely personal and spiritual. I'd love it if we had an ethicist on board. It certainly is fun to hash these things about.

Posted by: moxiemom | April 26, 2007 1:01 PM

About take your kid to work day, I loved going to work with my mom. I was so impressed with her office and her work. It was definitely eye-opening for me. Of course, I went when I was 11 or 12, so I was ready to entertain myself and maybe even file a little.

Personally, I don't think that the point of the day has been acheived and that the day is therefore irrelevant. For kids, the idea of work is still nebulous. I think it would be a great idea (as someone else already mentioned) to take your child to workplaces that interest him or her instead of just defaulting to your own. But that is easier said than done.

About the boy in Texas, my opinion is that any life-sustaining mechanism that is not curing someone or helping someone recover should not be used. In this boy's case, he's not getting better, so the mother is just prolonging his suffering. In this case, and in most cases in my opinion, the doctor's seem the have the boy's best interest in mind.

Posted by: Meesh | April 26, 2007 1:03 PM

Meesh, I'm not sure what SAS is, so I'm pretty sure I don't work there. ;-) I work in an academic research lab.


"have their spawn annoy the rest of us

what a b*tch

Posted by: | April 26, 2007 12:47 PM "

For the last time, "spawn" is a perfectly acceptable term for the offspring of a breeding animal. It's true that it is usually used to describe sea animals, but let's not be entirely humorless here. Humans are animals, and we breed. Just because it's not as agreeable to you as "bundle of precious heaven-sent joy" does not make it okay to call someone a b*tch. Which, by the way, is NOT a perfectly acceptable term to label a human, as it is used to describe a breeding canine.

Posted by: Mona | April 26, 2007 1:06 PM

Well moxiemom it is a tough issue. I probably sounded harsh, but if something was wrong with Laura Bush and a stem cell could save her don't you think the president would say go ahead and use it?

I probably sounded harsh, but if a stem cell could save my uncle, I am all for it. If it can make people shot down in war walk again, go for it. Life is personal and I am by no way immune to it. I had pre-term labor at 7 months and if my daughter would have been born, I would have wanted everything done to save her life.

However, I could also not stand by and watch her suffer, so at a certain point, I agree with MN about all of this too.

I just don't think people should be hypocritical about it because you don't know what you will do when it is your loved one or your child.

Posted by: scarry | April 26, 2007 1:08 PM

Moxiemom etal,
These end of life issues are why we all need to have two documents:
"Advanced care directives which allow patients to make their own decisions regarding the care they would prefer to receive if they develop a terminal illness or a life-threatening injury. Advanced care directives can also designate someone the patient trusts to make decisions about medical care, if the patient becomes unable to make (or communicate) these decisions.

Federal law requires hospitals, nursing homes, and other institutions that receive Medicare or Medicaid funds to provide written information regarding advanced care directives to all patients upon admission.
Advanced care directives can reduce:

Personal worry
Futile, costly, specialized interventions that a patient may not want
Overall health care costs
Feelings of helplessness and guilt for family
Legal concerns for everyone involved"

And a Healthcare Power of Attorney:
"Health Care Power of Attorney is needed to give another person authority to make health care choices for you."

Posted by: KLB SS MD | April 26, 2007 1:09 PM

Charles Krauthammer has stated in his Washington Post column that if a treatment that could cure him is made using embryonic stem cells, he will refuse it on moral and ethical grounds.

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 1:11 PM

For the last time, "spawn" is a perfectly acceptable term for the offspring of a breeding animal. It's true that it is usually used to describe sea animals, but let's not be entirely humorless here. Humans are animals, and we breed. Just because it's not as agreeable to you as "bundle of precious heaven-sent joy" does not make it okay to call someone a b*tch. Which, by the way, is NOT a perfectly acceptable term to label a human, as it is used to describe a breeding canine.

Not when it is used as an insult. Besides you don't get to decide what is acceptable.

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 1:12 PM

On Stem Cells. Why don't they use stem cells from the umbillical cord? This way you are not killing an embryo or doing anything controversial!

Posted by: Chris | April 26, 2007 1:14 PM

Chris it is really expensive to bank your baby's cord. Some people do it, but everyone as evidence by the spawn comment does not have or want children.

Posted by: scarry | April 26, 2007 1:16 PM

Mona,

While I love your argument, (truly - that was brilliantly funny), and consider it rather senseless to toss epithets at every annoying troll, the usage selected by 12:47 is a commonly accepted slang use of the term, and the third of 6 meanings of the word and several online dictionaries. Whether or not we approve of that usage, whether it's derogatory to women, etc. are arguments for another day, IMHO.

I suspect that the sort of person who comes on a blog of this nature and uses "spawn" in her message to refer to the offspring of her officemates likely is someone who also finds it difficult getting along with breeding humans, generally, and may in fact be aptly described by the term used by 12:47.

We agree that 12:47 would have been wise to resist the impulse to identify ms. spawn-user using such common parlance, if only because it is exceedingly uncivil and adds nothing to any of the several discussions at hand.

Posted by: Megan's Neighbor | April 26, 2007 1:18 PM

To Mona,

For the last time spawn offends some people, and you know it. If you don't want to be called a b*tch do use it as insult.

BTW, what a b*tch ;)

feel better?

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 1:19 PM

Charles Krauthammer has stated in his Washington Post column that if a treatment that could cure him is made using embryonic stem cells, he will refuse it on moral and ethical grounds.

Posted by: | April 26, 2007 01:11 PM

I hope this comes true.

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 1:20 PM

On language- but if "b*tch" was used in a RAP song in the context of abusive violence would it be acceptable on mortal and ethnical grounds? ;-P

We need to keep beating the nappy headed horse here...

*groan* sorry...

Posted by: Chris | April 26, 2007 1:22 PM

On the Texas kid issue, that is really tough. On the one hand, the kid is not getting any better and the parent's are not ready to let him die peacefully. It is really a matter of denial more then anything else. But on the other hand, do you really want to leave the decision up to the government or just doctors. It is in a doctors best interest to pull the plug and give away his bed to someone who has a chance to get better. And we all know it is in the hospitals best interest to get a paying customer in. I do think it speaks of the inequity of health care. That we would rather use an expensive hospital bill will the eventual tab is passed on by all paying customers or the general public rather then paying for cheaper in home nurses care for this kid. I just think if you let the government or the doctors decide there will be cases where people cut the plug too soon. As far as advice, this is why spouses need to talk about their wishes a head of time and get it in writing. DH and I both have living wills that are fairly specific. I told DH that I would opt for hospice care and no intervention except for pain. He wants to be living as much as possible. He wants to get those very last breaths on a ventilator. It is a good thing he told me because if it was left up to me and I did not know his wishes, I would have automatically cut the plug.

Posted by: foamgnome | April 26, 2007 1:22 PM

As evidenced by life... life is cheap. *sigh*

Posted by: Chris | April 26, 2007 1:23 PM

Scarry, I don't think you sounded harsh at all. The whole thing is so very difficult. We've been given this gift of science and technology, but there is a great burden in choosing how to use it appropriately. I don't have the answers, but I think its good to discuss. KLB thanks for the valuable insight and probably most important thing to come from this discussion.

Posted by: moxiemom | April 26, 2007 1:24 PM

"...I would have automatically cut the plug."

At last we find out how ruthless a gnome of foam can be... does DH know how you feel/ how much life insurance did you say he had? LMAO! ;-P

Posted by: Chris | April 26, 2007 1:27 PM

Charles Krauthammer has stated in his Washington Post column that if a treatment that could cure him is made using embryonic stem cells, he will refuse it on moral and ethical grounds.

Posted by: | April 26, 2007 01:11 PM

I hope this comes true.

Posted by: | April 26, 2007 01:20 PM

Personally, I hope he croaks before he has a chance to test it, that way we won't he won't be granted an opportunity to tell us what a vastly superior human he is to anyone who would dare decide differently.

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 1:27 PM

MN, as usual, a bullet-proof argument. Truly, I was being facetious (glad someone here got my humor!); I have learned the hard way not to use any kind of possibly slightly inflammatory words in this blog, lest I offend anyone. Maybe it's the biologist in me that doesn't object to these correct, if clinical, terms, or maybe I'm not as thin-skinned as I thought I was, but I have a feeling that if/when I become pregnant, I'll be the first one making the "I'm spawning" jokes.

Posted by: Mona | April 26, 2007 1:28 PM

On the one hand, the kid is not getting any better and the parent's are not ready to let him die peacefully.

Why don't they take him home and deal with it themselves? Until they are the ones actually doing the work, 24/7, including beating on the poor kid, it's academic.

In the meanwhile, what are you willing to bet there is someone who is being denied a bed?

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 1:29 PM

Those are good points Foam. My husband and I talked about this a little bit before I went to the hospital to have our baby, but I've got to say, neither of us were able to come to any real conclusions about what we would want. It all feels very nebulous, not to mention contextual. How do you know what you would want, without knowing the circumstances or details? Not easy stuff here when it comes to yourself. For my baby, I'm guessing I would probably be in denial, too. And I am generally a realist.

Posted by: Mama | April 26, 2007 1:29 PM

Mona, I am deeply offended and wounded by your political correctness!

Posted by: Chris | April 26, 2007 1:30 PM

It sounds like FoamGnome and her husband discussed it, so it's not an issue. And it doesn't sound as though she would make a decision for him that she wouldn't want made for her.

So what's the problem?

Posted by: to Chris | April 26, 2007 1:32 PM

For what it's worth, 40% of Medicare expenses end up being spent on the last year of life - not long term preventative or maintenance care. There has got to be some way to review how Medicare is paid out - even in superliberal Euro countries that have nationalized health care, they have cut off ages for certain treatments. I believe you don't get transplants if you're over 55, etc.

Posted by: drDr | April 26, 2007 1:33 PM

to to Chris: I was just teasing as evidenced by the "LMAO" and ";-P"

Posted by: Chris | April 26, 2007 1:39 PM

Did anyone note that this is the final Take Your Daughter to Work Day that the Ms. Foundation is sponsoring? Even they admit the purpose of this day is outdated.

As I write in my ABC7 blog, The Kitchen Think, today - "The era of "having it all" is over. Welcome to the age of "finding balance."

Check it out at:
http://thekitchenthink.viewfromthebay.com/

Posted by: MJ in SF | April 26, 2007 1:39 PM

I believe you don't get transplants if you're over 55, etc.

You can if you pay for them yourself.

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 1:39 PM

Chris, you have offended me by insulting my PC-ness!

Posted by: Mona | April 26, 2007 1:40 PM

Chris: I had to laugh when I read your comment. No, we just come from really different philosophies. I also want to be cremated with little ceremony. He wants a big expensive funeral with like a 100 of his relatives who he only sees at weddings and funeral present. That is why we need to talk about it. I see the only real issue if God forbid we needed to make decisions like that for our daughter. We both obviously have different view points. BTW, I am more insured them him. :)

Posted by: foamgnome | April 26, 2007 1:42 PM

Yes, sorry, that's what I meant - the national system just doesn't PAY for certain treatments, but you can get them if you pay for it yourself.

Posted by: drDr | April 26, 2007 1:43 PM

I believe you don't get transplants if you're over 55, etc.

You can if you pay for them yourself.

Posted by: | April 26, 2007 01:39 PM

Do get to hunt down your organ donor too? Or do you ship them in from elsewhere?

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 1:44 PM

The rumor that I am going bald is not true. My hair is simply migrating to my chin!

Posted by: Fred | April 26, 2007 1:44 PM

To MJ in SF: Is Van Amburg still around? Watched him for years on KGO-7, ages ago.

Posted by: Regular, who's a Bay Area native | April 26, 2007 1:45 PM

Do get to hunt down your organ donor too? Or do you ship them in from elsewhere?

Posted by: | April 26, 2007 01:44 PM

Organs are being bought and sold all the time, worldwide. If you can bypass the legitimate system, and find a good surgeon and team who will implant that organ in you, you are golden. So sorry to everyone who is playing by the rules.

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 1:47 PM

As Charles Krauthammer is likely to be dead before the use of stem cells has advanced to the point where he would qualify to have it done, it's an easy statement for him to make. He isn't likely to face the challenge of actually having a real decision to make.

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 1:49 PM

Organs are being bought and sold all the time, worldwide.

I have to wonder if they come from legal sources or have I seen to many horror flicks?

Posted by: scarry | April 26, 2007 1:51 PM

Scarry - many of the very poor in southeast asia sell their organs for donations - I believe there was an article in the NYT recently about the growing number of Israelis who go to China (bring their own doctor) and get a transplant from someone there who has sold an organ to make $ for their families.....

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 1:52 PM

On the cord blood issue, I did a tad bit of research on this when my daughter was born. Basically, it is pretty expensive and there is no guarantees these holding companies will be around when your child is older. Even the fertility clinics usually make you sign a contract to destroy embryos after 5 or 6 years. They don't want little frozen people just sitting around. Basically the articles I read said only the rich and doctors seem to be doing this. And unless you had some rare genes, there would most likely be a match in the general population. They did say AA should store cord blood more then other racial groups. I think they wanted like 3 or 4K and a nominal fee each year. In short, we decided against it. But it does always make me wonder if we made the right decision.

Posted by: foamgnome | April 26, 2007 1:52 PM

Brother bought a coconut, he bought it for a dime
His sister had another one, she paid it for the lime

She put the lime in the coconut, she drank 'em both up (3x)
Put the lime in the coconut, she called the doctor, woke him up, and said

Doctor, ain't there nothin' I can take, I said
Doctor, to relieve this bellyache, I said
Doctor, ain't there nothin' I can take, I said
Doctor, to relieve this bellyache

Now let me get this straight
Put the lime in the coconut, you drank 'em both up (3x)
Put the lime in the coconut, you called your doctor, woke him up, and said

Doctor, ain't there nothin' I can take, I said
Doctor, to relieve this bellyache, I said
Doctor, ain't there nothin' I can take, I said
Doctor, to relieve this bellyache

You put the lime in the coconut, you drink 'em both together
Put the lime in the coconut, then you feel better
Put the lime in the coconut, drink 'em both up
Put the lime in the coconut, and call me in the morning

Brother bought a coconut, he bought it for a dime
His sister had another one, she paid it for the lime
She put the lime in the coconut, she drank 'em both up
Put the lime in the coconut, she called the doctor, woke him up, and said

Doctor, ain't there nothin' I can take, I said
Doctor, to relieve this bellyache, I said
Doctor, ain't there nothin' I can take, I said
Now let me get this straight

You put the lime in the coconut, you drink 'em both up (3x)
Put the lime in the coconut, you're such a silly woman

Put the lime in the coconut, you drink 'em both together
Put the lime in the coconut, then you feel better
Put the lime in the coconut, drink 'em both down
Put the lime in the coconut, and call me in the morning

Woo-oo, ain't there nothin' you can take, I said
Woo-oo, to relieve your bellyache, you said
Woo-oo, ain't there nothin' I can take, I said
Woo-oo, to relieve your bellyache, you say

Yeah-ah, ain't there nothing I can take, I say
Wow-ow, to relieve this bellyache, I said
Doctor, ain't there nothin' I can take, I said (3x)
Doctor, you're such a silly woman

Put the lime in the coconut, you drink 'em both together
Put the lime in the coconut, then you feel better
Put the lime in the coconut, drink 'em both up
Put the lime in the coconut, and call me in the mo-o-ornin'

Yes, you call me in the morning
If you call me in the morning I'll tell you what to do {repeat to fade}

Posted by: Guess Who? | April 26, 2007 1:54 PM

That is really sad that people have to sell their organs to help their family.

Posted by: scarry | April 26, 2007 1:57 PM

That is really sad that people have to sell their organs to help their family.

Posted by: scarry | April 26, 2007 01:57 PM

Some people sell their relatives to make money. It is a very sad world we live in.

Posted by: foamgnome | April 26, 2007 1:58 PM

I'd love to ask Krauthammer and others of his ilk how they feel about the thousands of embryos being discarded every week at fertility clinics around the country.

Posted by: Meesh | April 26, 2007 1:58 PM

Meesh: I was always wondered about the irony that the prolifers and anti stem cell researchers have no issues with disregarded embryos from IVF. My guess is everyone likes to think of IVF as life giving. Providing that beautiful 8 lb healthy baby to the infertile couple. They don't want to think of the other six embryos that are thrown out because the couple got the one or two miracle children they were hoping for. Again, you can always convince yourself something is good or bad.

Posted by: foamgnome | April 26, 2007 2:02 PM

That is really sad that people have to sell their organs to help their family.

Posted by: scarry | April 26, 2007 01:57 PM

Some people sell their relatives to make money. It is a very sad world we live in.


Posted by: foamgnome | April 26, 2007 01:58 PM

It always has been. The press is more widespread now though.

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 2:05 PM

Again, you can always convince yourself something is good or bad.

Particularly if you throw in the bible as justification, or God.

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 2:06 PM

Foam - you are right about selling their kids, although mostly its daughters. Speaking of pimping your kids. Is anyone watching the Tudors - love the way Mr. Boleyn tries to pimp both his daughters to King Henry, makes Alec Baldwin look like dad of the year.

Posted by: moxiemom | April 26, 2007 2:07 PM

Meesh: I was always wondered about the irony that the prolifers and anti stem cell researchers have no issues with disregarded embryos from IVF. My guess is everyone likes to think of IVF as life giving. Providing that beautiful 8 lb healthy baby to the infertile couple. They don't want to think of the other six embryos that are thrown out because the couple got the one or two miracle children they were hoping for. Again, you can always convince yourself something is good or bad.

Posted by: foamgnome | April 26, 2007 02:02 PM

Actually, the pro-life movement has HUGE issues with discarding these embryos. There are several organizations focused on finding parents to adopt these embryos.

"The California-based Snowflakes Frozen Embryo Adoption Program (www.Snowflakes.org) is the oldest service, founded in 1997. Newer services include the National Embryo Donation Center (www.EmbryoDonation.org) in Tennessee and Embryos Alive (www.EmbryosAlive.com) in Ohio.

All the services have one purpose -- providing a chance at birth for embryos that otherwise would be left frozen indefinitely, destroyed for research or simply discarded. Although fertility clinics have, for a while, facilitated anonymous embryo donation, embryo adoption services give donating parents greater freedom in choosing the adopting parents."

Posted by: Megan's Neighbor | April 26, 2007 2:09 PM

moxiemom you should watch ann of 1000 days if you like the Tudors. I've seen it a couple times and it was interesting. I think Richard Burton is in it.

Posted by: scarry | April 26, 2007 2:09 PM

MN:I should say some pro lifers. My mormon friends are very anti abortion but do participate in IVF procedures.

Posted by: foamgnome | April 26, 2007 2:10 PM

The shark called, he's tired of jumping, says we should all get a life.

Posted by: pATRICK | April 26, 2007 2:10 PM

A Doctor and Plumber are in the same country club. On Sunday Morning the Doctor wakes up to find his toilet blocked. So he calls the Plumber.
"But I don't work Sundays! Can't it wait until tomorrow."

The Doctor said. "I don't like working Sundays either but if you were in trouble, and felt sick, I would come to your house to see you"

"OK" says the Plumber and goes to the doctor's house. He goes upstairs and looks at the toilet, takes two aspirins from his pocket and throws them down the bowl.

"There" he says "If it's not better in the morning, call me."

Posted by: Joke Time | April 26, 2007 2:11 PM

Some people sell their relatives to make money. It is a very sad world we live in.


Posted by: foamgnome | April 26, 2007 01:58 PM

It always has been. The press is more widespread now though.

Posted by: | April 26, 2007 02:05 PM


Always blame the media.

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 2:11 PM

BTW, Catholic church is against all three:abortion, IVF and stem cell research.

Posted by: foamgnome | April 26, 2007 2:11 PM

BTW, Catholic church is against all three:abortion, IVF and stem cell research.

Posted by: foamgnome | April 26, 2007 02:11 PM

The Catholic Church also opposes the death penalty. I disagree with its positions, but respect its consistency. It makes a lot more sense to me to consistently say, life is life, than to base your moral compass on the manner in which the woman got pregnant, or on just how depraved that quadruple murder was. but that's just me.

Posted by: Megan's Neighbor | April 26, 2007 2:15 PM

Megan's Neighbor,

That is really interesting. If, these embroyos are children shouldn't the parents be responsible for them? Are there any laws on the books about carring for an embroyo?

I just think it is silly to adopt and embroyo when their are lots of unwanted children in the world.

Posted by: scarry | April 26, 2007 2:16 PM

Thanks scarry, I will check it out. I just read an interesting bit on Liz Taylor by Dominick Dunne in Vanity Fair that has piqued my interest in the two. The Tudors is my substitute for Rome - neither of which is completely accurate, but a lot of fun to watch and better than most of the other junk on.

Posted by: moxiemom | April 26, 2007 2:16 PM

The Catholic Church also opposes the Iraq War. This is called the "whole cloth" approach to life.

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 2:17 PM

They also agree with breaking the law, that is illegal immigration.

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 2:18 PM

They also agree with breaking the law, that is illegal immigration.

Posted by: | April 26, 2007 02:18 PM


They believe in a higher law.

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 2:20 PM

MN:Yes, I forgot the death penalty one too. You don't hear that much about that one lately. But the Catholic church seems to be very consistent, which is not true of other Christian Denominations that allow death penalty or IVF but are against abortion. I asked a Mormon friend why it was OK to kill a person who was already born (death penalty) and not an unborn person (fetus). She told me because the prisoner deserves it. Hmm, real Christian attitude.

Scarry, I don't get the adoption of an embryo versus adoption of a person who is already born. If nothing else, you have bigger chance the child would not be born due to miscarriage with an embryo. But my guess it is parents who want to experience pregnancy, birth, and raising the child from day one.

Posted by: foamgnome | April 26, 2007 2:20 PM

scarry, As I understand it, the "parents" of the about-to-be-destroyed embryos don't want them and authorize their destruction. We can't make someone get implanted if they don't want to (not that you were suggesting otherwise).

I tend to agree with your conclusion, but that's because I'm also firmly in the camp with you of those more worried about the kids who are here. On the other hand, I can understand that, for someone who sincerely believes that life begins at conception, there is no meaningful distinction between unwanted children already born and unwanted children not yet born.

Posted by: Megan's Neighbor | April 26, 2007 2:21 PM

MN:I heard very few of those disregarded embryo actually get adopted and implant successfully to produce children. It seems like pro lifers think this a great option but the majority of infertile couples prefer to make their own embryos or seek out egg or sperm donors. If they use a egg or sperm donor they can at least have 1/2 a genetic link to their child.

Posted by: foamgnome | April 26, 2007 2:24 PM

Guess who is not me, that's for darn sure (I would have changed the words)... though I am tempted to replace it with:

Brother bought a left kidney he bought it for a dime
Sister bought another one, she paid for it online.

But it just goes downhill from there...

Posted by: Chris | April 26, 2007 2:26 PM

Thank God the Nazis were 60 years too early. I think Hitler would have loved stem cell research. I am undecided on it personally.

Posted by: pATRICK | April 26, 2007 2:26 PM

Brother bought a left kidney he bought it for a dime
Sister bought another one, she paid for it online.

That is great!:)

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 2:27 PM

Thank God the Nazis were 60 years too early. I think Hitler would have loved stem cell research. I am undecided on it personally.

Posted by: pATRICK | April 26, 2007 02:26 PM
Hitler experimented with eugenics. It is kind of scary to think of stem cell research in the hands of the wicked.

Posted by: foamgnome | April 26, 2007 2:28 PM

Well, I believe that life starts at conception. I am after all a Catholic, although not a very good one because I personally believe in the death penalty for people who have committed heinous crimes.

However, I was also raised by a very rational mother and I believe that people are in control of their own bodies, that is, abortion, IFV, euthanasia, etc. You can probably guess I don't go to church that much. :) What I wouldn't do shouldn't affect what you would do and vice versus.

I guess I just wanted to know if the parents had some responsibility to the embryo or not. Thanks for answering my question.

Posted by: scarry | April 26, 2007 2:29 PM

Chris, that's a fab start, LOL.

pATRICK, Can it be? You are undecided on a major ethical topic of the day? Just kidding. Honestly, I have an opinion on stem cells, but I keep reading and listening because I am not yet comfortable with it, and it may well.

Posted by: Megan's Neighbor | April 26, 2007 2:30 PM

"Charles Krauthammer has stated in his Washington Post column that if a treatment that could cure him is made using embryonic stem cells, he will refuse it on moral and ethical grounds.

Posted by: | April 26, 2007 01:11 PM

I hope this comes true.

Posted by: | April 26, 2007 01:20 PM

Personally, I hope he croaks before he has a chance to test it, that way we won't he won't be granted an opportunity to tell us what a vastly superior human he is to anyone who would dare decide differently.

Posted by: | April 26, 2007 01:27 PM"

I don't read this particular columnist, so I have no personal opinion of him. However, it seems that he has convictions that he intends to stand by. I respect that, even if I don't have the same convictions.

What I don't respect is people who wish to see someone dead because they have a differing view.

Posted by: anon for this | April 26, 2007 2:35 PM

"They believe in a higher law."

Yeah, and the size of your hat determines how important you are, down the line.

Oh, then there's the psky little indulgence isue.

And they're a safe-haven for repressed, disturbed men who prey on boys.

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 2:37 PM

Cultural Tidbit of the Day

(Special CTOTD for the kiddies and the young at heart.)

Someone at some point today asked how to engender interest in the fine arts within their "spawn." Several musical pieces are written for an orchestra with children in mind. One such is Sergei Prokofiev's "Peter and the Wolf." Each character in the story has a musical theme played by different instruments in the orchestra. Here is a link to some details:

http://www.philtulga.com/Peter.html

Another popular piece to introduce children to classical music is "Carnival of the Animals" by Camille Saint-Saens

Posted by: Fred | April 26, 2007 2:37 PM

I heard somewhere that the process of sroing embiblical cord blood could actually be harmful to the child who was just born-- that the process takes away nutriants, oxygen, etc. that the baby uses. Maybe not so in every case and even if true, perhaps there is no long term damage, but it helped memake the decision to not pay out all the money for the procedure. I also hope it I don't regret my decision.

Posted by: Jen | April 26, 2007 2:37 PM

I have no idea whether that's true or not. But a generally reliable source for medical info is http://www.webmd.com so maybe you can learn more there and share with us.

Posted by: To Jen | April 26, 2007 2:46 PM

What I don't respect is people who wish to see someone dead because they have a differing view.


Posted by: anon for this | April 26, 2007 02:35 PM

Sing it, sister.

Posted by: Megan's Neighbor | April 26, 2007 2:46 PM

d'oh

Should have been

"Brother bought a left kidney he bought it for a dime
Sister bought the other one, and paid for it online."

She put the kidneys in him, she stitched 'em all up (3x)
Bought the kidneys on the internet, she called the postman, woke him up, and said

Postman, if you drop it it will break, I said
Postman, do you have my reeebate, I said
Postman, if you bring it to me late, I said
Postman, they will deteriorate.

Now let me get this straight
Buy the kidneys on the internet, you buy 'em both up (3x)
buy the kidneys on the internet, you called your doctor, woke him up, and said

Doctor, what insurance will you take?, I said
Doctor, please don't do a double take, I said
Doctor, I don't want to be awake, I said
Doctor, when the kidneys I intake.

Posted by: Chris | April 26, 2007 2:47 PM

2:37: Amen to that! The laws of the church are for everybody else.

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 2:48 PM

klb- haven't cracked the can yet...not sure why. maybe waiting for the appropriate accompaniment?

Chris-Oh my word...you've trumped the Doors. I wasn't sure it was doable, but you managed.

Posted by: dotted | April 26, 2007 2:49 PM

"Chris, that's a fab start, LOL.

pATRICK, Can it be? You are undecided on a major ethical topic of the day? Just kidding. Honestly, I have an opinion on stem cells, but I keep reading and listening because I am not yet comfortable with it, and it may well."

Yes, it's true. I just think that it has so many potential benefits and so many potential misuses it's hard to decide and bio medical issues are not something I generally dabble in.

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 2:50 PM

Brother bought a left kidney he bought it for a dime
Sister bought the other one, and paid for it online."

She put the kidneys in him, she stitched 'em all up (3x)
Bought the kidneys on the internet, she called the postman, woke him up, and said

Postman, if you drop it it will break, I said
Postman, do you have my reeebate, I said
Postman, if you bring it to me late, I said
Postman, they will deteriorate.

Now let me get this straight
Buy the kidneys on the internet, you buy 'em both up (3x)
buy the kidneys on the internet, you called your doctor, woke him up, and said

Doctor, what insurance will you take?, I said
Doctor, please don't do a double take, I said
Doctor, I don't want to be awake, I said
Doctor, when the kidneys I intake"


--------Sung to the beat of 'MY HUMPS' by the Black Eyed Peas

Posted by: pATRICK | April 26, 2007 2:53 PM

Crazy Tidbits of the Day:

Melbourne Fl, home of a recent guest writer on this blog.

Also, birthplace of Jim Morrison (speaking of the doors).

Also, place where Captain America (despite being recently deceased)just molested a woman at a bar.

Posted by: Chris | April 26, 2007 2:54 PM

Also, place where Captain America (despite being recently deceased)just molested a woman at a bar.

you have been watching o'reilly

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 2:55 PM

Chris wins post of the day, hands-down.

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 2:57 PM

Nope, now I'll have to see what he said!

Posted by: Chris | April 26, 2007 3:01 PM

Dammit Chris,

Here I TRY to bring culture to this blog and what happens, you outshine me again!

Just goes to show that women love the bad boys!

Posted by: Fred | April 26, 2007 3:04 PM

Sorry Fred, we all know it's the guy who wore his rank on his sleeve whose input really matters. I'm just a fountain of useless information. My wife has a better way of putting it. ;-P

To get back on that earlier note... didn't Patrick Stewart narrate Peter and the Wolf?

Posted by: Chris | April 26, 2007 3:15 PM

Many fine actors have narrated Peter and the Wolf, so there's a wide selection available to you should you wish to obtain a recording.

Posted by: To Chris | April 26, 2007 3:18 PM

Chris,
What can I say, the Spec 4 mafia is alive and well!

BTW, I moved out of my cube into a real office yesterday. What does this have to do with Balance? After I read the first two lines of Chris's Coconuts, I closed the door so people would not think that I was "off" balance! It was so damned funny!

Posted by: Fred | April 26, 2007 3:23 PM

or was it Data and the Warf... regardless, I'd rather listen to Capt Picard read it than anyone else. Make it so!

Posted by: Chris | April 26, 2007 3:24 PM

What I don't respect is people who wish to see someone dead because they have a differing view.

Wishing someone were dead isn't the same thing as making it happen.

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 3:27 PM

Congrats Fred!!! Someday I hope to crack the cube and hatch into a real office as well... There has been an empty office with a window across from me for ages... but the company would have to justify spending however many billions to pay the contracted union movers to move my computer and phone (things I could do myself). Oh well...

Posted by: Chris | April 26, 2007 3:28 PM

Wishing someone were dead isn't the same thing as making it happen.

Posted by: | April 26, 2007 03:27 PM

But it is surely a indication of the moral character of that person!

Posted by: Fred | April 26, 2007 3:28 PM

"Wishing someone were dead isn't the same thing as making it happen"

No one said it was the same thing.

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 3:28 PM

Wishing someone were dead isn't the same thing as making it happen.

Posted by: | April 26, 2007 03:27 PM

But it is surely a indication of the moral character of that person!

Posted by: Fred | April 26, 2007 03:28 PM

Not necessarily. I've wished for people to die, rather than being a continuous hassle and drain on my life and resources. Generally, the moment passes. If it doesn't, I figure out a way to keep them far, far away or out of my life entirely.

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 3:39 PM

The office has nothing to do with what I have done, just what I do!

I handle some very confidential (commercial) matters.

Posted by: Fred | April 26, 2007 3:41 PM

thanks for the referal-- webMD says that cord blood harvesting does not harm the baby or the mother, but at least 30 seconds should pass before the cord is clamped. And the later the clamp is applied, the less blood there will be to draw out.

If the hospital allows donations, then i will do that. otherwise, I'll take my chances (fingers-crossed!) Tough choice to make!

Posted by: Jen | April 26, 2007 3:43 PM

Not necessarily. I've wished for people to die, rather than being a continuous hassle and drain on my life and resources. Generally, the moment passes. If it doesn't, I figure out a way to keep them far, far away or out of my life entirely.

Posted by: | April 26, 2007 03:39 PM

In all seriousness, wishing someone were dead because he holds opinions on political and social issues which I find abhorrent is not the same as, hypothetically, wishing my grandmother were dead because we are broke and exhausted from providing hospice care. No one is passing judgment on those thoughts that might pass through someone's brain matter on a dark night under severe personal pressure. At least not today we're not.

But to wish a columnist dead because one thinks he's an idiot does strike me as being a bit careless with life or perhaps only embarrassingly immature.

Posted by: Megan's Neighbor | April 26, 2007 3:45 PM

Come on Washington Post, Leslie, Brian, the posts wishing for one of your journalist to die and all post that reference it needs to be deleted! That is just plain wrong!

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 3:46 PM

BTW, please find a new name for your Crazy Tidbits of the Day. The abbreviation (CTOTD) could well infringe on my copywrited Cultural Tidbit of the Day (CTOTD).

Maybe Chris's Crazy... (CCTOTD) or Crazy Chris's... Also CCTOTD

Posted by: Fred | April 26, 2007 3:46 PM

The same Charles Krauthammer who is featured on Fox? Didn't he say that the Virginia Tech shooter drew his inspiration from al Jazeera and Islamic suicide bombers?

How in the world does he know this, and what is his point? Does he really think that Christians are incapable of murder (let's think Oklahoma City, or how about the Reformation or Northern Ireland)?

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 3:59 PM

Couldn't someone just as easily say that al Jazeera and Islamic suicide bombers drew their inspiration from the Japanese kamikazes?

Why not just say that people have done horrible things since the beginning of time and have done with it?

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 4:01 PM

Well, he did write this (but he overlooked the more recent blood-letting in Ireland when he said that Christianity had given up on violence):

The fact is that all three monotheistic religions have in their long histories wielded the sword. The Book of Joshua is knee-deep in blood. The real Hanukkah story, so absurdly twinned (by calendric accident) with the Christian festival of peace, is about a savage insurgency and civil war.

Christianity more than matched that lurid history with the Crusades, an ecumenical blood bath that began with the slaughter of Jews in the Rhineland, a kind of preseason warm-up to the featured massacres to come against the Muslims, with the sacking of the capital of Byzantium (the Fourth Crusade) thrown in for good measure.

Posted by: re: Krauthammer | April 26, 2007 4:05 PM

How in the world does he know this, and what is his point? Does he really think that Christians are incapable of murder (let's think Oklahoma City, or how about the Reformation or Northern Ireland)?"

Not biting today.

Posted by: pATRICK | April 26, 2007 4:05 PM

Couldn't someone just as easily say that al Jazeera and Islamic suicide bombers drew their inspiration from the Japanese kamikazes?

Why not just say that people have done horrible things since the beginning of time and have done with it?

Posted by: | April 26, 2007 04:01 PM

because that's not his opinion and he's paid to write a column that represents his opinion.

If you can get someone to pay you to express your opinions, you can use that forum to say: people have done horrible things since the beginning of time. Until that time, you're limited to hitting the "submit" button and hoping someone cares.

Posted by: Barney | April 26, 2007 4:05 PM

It's been less than a month since the last rehashed rehash of atrocities committed by Christians. ya - awn.

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 4:08 PM

Jesus approved of his Father's command that children who curse their parents are to be put to death (Matthew 15:3-4). Jesus chastised the Pharisees for failing to kill those children who defied their parents' commands (Mark 7:9-13). Jesus told us we are to live our lives in fear of God for God has the power not only to kill us, but to torture us forever in Hell (Luke 12:5). Jesus never contradicted his Father's word, and anyone who suggests otherwise is going straight to Hell.

The smell of blood and roasted corpses was not just pleasing to God, who especially enjoyed the aroma after the Great Flood (Genesis 8:21), it was enjoyed by Jesus as well. Jesus certainly wasn't averse to malicious, virulent punishments to those who didn't accept His every word as Gospel. To name but a few, Jesus told the disciples to bring before Him any man who didn't believe in Him, and to violently slaughter the non-believer while Jesus watched (Luke 19:27). Jesus killed one man by having his body eaten by a swarm of worms because the man failed to give Jesus His due (Acts 12:23). Jesus struck a Jew blind for thwarting His teachings (Acts 13:8-11). He struck a man dumb for failing to listen well (Luke 1:20). He took the lives of a husband and wife by scaring them to death for not forking over all the money they made on a real estate transaction (Acts 5:1-10). During one particularly temperamental time when Jesus was hungry, He even killed a fig tree for failing to bear figs, even though Jesus knew figs weren't in season (Mark 11:12-14).

Posted by: Really? | April 26, 2007 4:13 PM

Don't forget the Inquisition.

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 4:15 PM

Wow! This blog sure took a dump today.

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 4:23 PM

REALLY, even the devil can quote scripture. When you die perhaps you can apologize to Jesus then. Yawn

Posted by: pATRICK | April 26, 2007 4:27 PM

4:15, no one expects the (Spanish) Inquisition.

Posted by: WorkingMomX | April 26, 2007 4:28 PM

Maybe this has already been said, but there must be some consideration of the COST of sustaining this life, against the doctors' advice. I am not of the mind that the medical profession is always right, but at some point we need to weight a 1 in 1 million chance of recovery against the fact that the money being spent could go to help the uninsured or someone else. Hospitals are in crisis because of this, making it more difficult to serve others.

I don't mean to be cruel -- I really feel for this mother. But public policy is truly about weighing costs and benefits. We cannot do everything for everyone -- and we need to decided where our money is best spent. Unfortunately, this means that the poor -- who must rely on public dollars for assistance -- are going to have fewer options than those who can pay out of pocket. But actions like this woman's hurt the poor too -- by making Medicaid costs skyrocket, resulting in cut-backs and less political support.

Posted by: DC Mom | April 26, 2007 4:31 PM

4:15, no one expects the (Spanish) Inquisition.

Posted by: WorkingMomX | April 26, 2007 04:28 PM

Posted by: Huh? | April 26, 2007 4:40 PM

when I die, I'd like to ask Jesus what the parable of the fig tree is about--that one has always been unsettling to me. pATRICK are there any parts of the Bible that you are mystified by-- anything you'd ask Jesus about?

Posted by: Jen | April 26, 2007 4:41 PM

In reference to an above, actually on topic, message above, I believe the ms. Foundation originally created this program so young girls could see that the sky is the limit-to see all the opportunities for them, to tell them that they could do things that men can do, even if women before them haven't.
So then boys were left in classrooms wondering why the girls got to take a day off, so to speak, so *other* people changed it to be take your sons too. Which was really counter to the original mission. Of course, since women are jumping ahead of boys by leaps and bounds in education, one could possibly be safe to say this has accomplished its mission. Or not.
I think especially in today's day and age, that it is important to let your children know what you do-but for many of us, that is so difficult. Which is why it's important.
I hope that makes any sense.

Posted by: atlmom | April 26, 2007 4:43 PM

Female faculty members sue Penn State medical school
Thursday, April 26, 2007
The Associated Press

HARRISBURG -- Eight women who hold senior faculty positions at Penn State's medical school have sued the institution and administrators, claiming that a decades-old pattern of discriminatory pay practices illegally favors men.

Gender bias at the Penn State College of Medicine in Hershey produces lower pay and benefits for women, including lower pensions, according to the federal civil-rights lawsuit filed this week.

The plaintiffs teach a range of advanced subjects, from biochemistry to gynecology to pharmacology. They obtained "right-to-sue" letters in January after pursuing complaints with the Pennsylvania Human Relations Commission and the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

They are seeking damages including retroactive pay and retirement benefits, and future compensation equal to men in parallel positions.

Penn State spokesman Bill Mahon declined to comment on the lawsuit's specifics, but said the EEOC investigation did not establish that any violations had occurred.

Posted by: Equality has not yet been achieved in all major employment areas | April 26, 2007 4:50 PM

Are you saying that Christian violence, slaughter and forced conversions of the Spanish and Portuguese Inquisitions weren't as significant or as brutal as the Crusades, Reformation or Northern Ireland? I don't understand your comment.

Posted by: To WorkingMomX | April 26, 2007 4:54 PM

i think it's just a Monty Python reference.

Posted by: Jen | April 26, 2007 4:56 PM

from cnn.com - "MIT dean resigns over misrepresented credentials"

misrepresented is the nice way of saying she lied about her educational background. I hope that women don't achieve equality in the 'cheating and lying to get ahead' arena.

Posted by: huh? | April 26, 2007 4:56 PM

"when I die, I'd like to ask Jesus what the parable of the fig tree is about--that one has always been unsettling to me. pATRICK are there any parts of the Bible that you are mystified by-- anything you'd ask Jesus about? "

Yes, why Jesus never seemed to want anyone to know about his acts of mercy. As if someone who can now walk or see etc would not run to the first person they could find and say " Hey look at me, Jesus healed me!" That seems strange, their are others but that came to mind.

Posted by: pATRICK | April 26, 2007 4:57 PM

I'd rather talk about what the Doors would do instead of what Jesus would do as I can not imagine what the son of God would do.

Posted by: dotted | April 26, 2007 5:05 PM

i think it's just a Monty Python reference.

Posted by: Jen | April 26, 2007 04:56 PM


So does WorkingMomX think the Inquisition is just a joke now? It was a phsyical and cultural genocide that lasted for centuries.

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 5:06 PM

Holy crap foamgnome - did you do any work today? Over twenty posts, including some very very long ones.

Just as an aside: "Watching a 2 year old get on a bus to go to preschool for three mornings a week is heart breaking. No child should have to do that. There is something wrong with needing car seats on school buses! Little kids like that should not be in school. But she has to be."

She does not HAVE to be in school at age two; she could be home with you or in daycare and go to speech therapy appointments to ensure she has the treatment she needs to be mainstreamed for kindergarten. And even if she had to be in school at such an early age, she didn't have to ride a bus to school; you or someone else could have transported her to school.

Posted by: Anonymous | April 26, 2007 5:13 PM

vicious opinion at 5:13.

Reading what foamgnome wrote, she would love to agree with you. however, if you read the entire section, her child needs the special school separate from her daycare situation.

Your judgemental opinion doesn't suit the situation and doesn't help at all. It is always better to try to help someone instead of cast aspersions.

Posted by: dotted | April 26, 2007 5:37 PM

eat dirt.

Posted by: to anon at 5:13 | April 26, 2007 5:41 PM

Well put, Dotted.

Posted by: catlady | April 26, 2007 5:43 PM

Been too busy lately to read or post.

But on a take-off from our topic today, how many people are going to take our sons (and daughters) to the NFL draft this weekend? :~) Anyone paying much attention to it this year, or have a dog in the fight for your team(s) or choice?

Personally, I'm looking forward to it...

Posted by: Texas Dad of 2 | April 26, 2007 6:13 PM

Foamgnome, if you're still out there, has anyone ever recommended you get a hammock for your daughter. The kind that suspends from the ceiling?

We recently bought one for DD, and while she has never been diagnosed as LD, I was chatting with the gentleman we bought it from and he mentioned that they are highly recommended for children with autism spectrum disorders.

I can get you a link if you're interested. If you google hammock and autism, you will find a couple of studies.

Posted by: Vegas Mom | April 26, 2007 6:14 PM

Just went through moxiemom's posting form this morning about the child in Austin.

Interesting delimma. Not that there isn't a money angle involved, but Doctors tend to take that Hippocratic Oath stuff pretty seriously. When Doctor's finally say it's time to pull the plug, they have ususally went through every possible positve outcome and found them unworkable.

In my experience there is no vast death lobby trying to pull the plug on people, money or not. And Doctor's wouldn't stand for it if there were such a thing.

So I guess I can see both sides. You want a family to make such decisions, but what about those cases where the family can't or won't let go?

Sorry if there is a later long discussion on this that I haven't read yet, and this is old news.

Posted by: Texas Dad of 2 | April 26, 2007 6:31 PM

Texas dad: there was some discussion, I think most people agree with you - especially when those resources can be used elsewhere to treat people who will be getting better.

In the US, we want all the healthcare that we want, when we want it, for everyone. We couldn't possibly afford it, and I think people are just now figuring that out. It was said above that certain treatments in Europe are not done on older people - but you can pay for it if you want to. Which means, still, those with resources can get their health care how and when they want. But when you are at the mercy of others (i.e., others are paying the bills), while you should be treated humanely, someone else is making the decisions. That's the way it is.

Posted by: atlmom | April 26, 2007 9:15 PM

to YIKES:

Ritalin:

I just added an afternoon dose of Ritalin to my daily dose of Concerta in the morning. The fighting in my life since I started the ADD drugs has almost stopped. I started them when i was 24/25ish. Too much Concerta type drugs and you get too detail focused, too much ritalin and you'll get wild (like a little sugar high kid) right amount and its perfect. I was uncomfortable with the Ritalin I don't know why, until my Fiancee and I were in a really loud restaurant (out of control kids nearby, interesting conversations I couldn't filter at other tables) and I was getting stressed and starting to turn really mean and picking fights, when i remembered I needed to take the silly pill (this was like in the first week after I'd been rx'd the afternoon dose) after the medication hit my system I could ignore all of the background stuff, my stress levels went down immediately, and I stopped hitting the "Fight or FLIGHT" mode. Please try the meds, they have ended a lot of suffering and misery for me, and I take them willingly now. This is something a lot of parents don't get is that thedrugs don't dope you (or shouldn't, thats a sign of too much) they help you filter, its like sunglasses at the beach, everyone else automatically knew to have them and you didn't. It takes a while to get your meds perfect, but the difference is amazing.

Posted by: ljb | April 26, 2007 10:02 PM

I am a single middle-aged man who worked on activities for "Take Your Child To Work Day". My efforts were "voluntary" in name only. It was expected that I work on the activities, as I have done so for 14 years. Many businesses and government agencies had programs that required preparation. Moreover, money was spent on the events that could be better spent on other matters.

The events did not benefit me or many other single employees. I doubt that my employer will give the employees credit for their participation. I don't think that many parents or their children particularly appreciated my efforts, either. I am sure that the children enjoyed a day off from school, which I am supporting with my taxes, though. Plus, I think that some parents frequently look down on single, never-married people, and it annoys me that this activity was foisted on us.

I think that the more appropriate solution is to give parents several hours off from work, so they may visit the schools that the children attend. I think that is better for the parents and children than "Take Your Child To Work Day".

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