Cartoons!

I always have felt a titch sorry for American kids who grew up in intellectually superior homes without televisions, or those in adventurous diplomatic or military families who spent significant parts of their childhoods living in exotic, enriching locations abroad. Because they missed a defining elxperience of American childhood: watching cartoons. Cartoons constitute our shared history, our culture, at least for kids born after 1960.

Cartoons shaped part of my own work/life balance, primarily due to one favorite cartoon: The Flintstones. And one very special episode, where Fred and Wilma trade gender roles. Fred dons Wilma's frilly white apron and has a fine old time cooking, cleaning and gabbing with Barney. Wilma puts on a hard hat and roars away in Fred's bulldozer. This episode showed me in no uncertain terms that the divine beings in my life (cartoon creators) believed men and women could trade gender roles with ease, alacrity and joy -- even in the 1960s.

The modern day equivalent of The Flintstones, of course, is the longest-running sitcom in TV history, The Simpsons, which recently passed the 400 episode mark and launched a major motion picture opening today. The cartoon is an intergenerational favorite in our kitchen. Kids, babysitters and us parents all identify with the modern parenting and life dilemmas Marge and Homer (named after creator Matt Groening's own mother and father) and their three children duke out.

So tell us: What is your favorite childhood cartoon? How does it relate to your work/life balance and parenting philosophy today?

By Leslie Morgan Steiner |  July 27, 2007; 7:00 AM ET  | Category:  Free-for-All
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The Jetsons. I can still sing the theme song!

Posted by: Caroline | July 27, 2007 7:09 AM

There are so many it is hard to pick a favorite:
Hekyl and Jekyl
Road Runner
Fearless Fly
Lippy the Lion and Hardy Har Har

Posted by: KLB SS MD | July 27, 2007 7:16 AM

Family Guy.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 7:32 AM

How could I fail to cite the Jetsons! Of course!

And Simba the White Lion.

Posted by: Leslie | July 27, 2007 7:32 AM

Underdog
Ultraman
H.R. Pufnstuf
The Electric Company
Josie and the Pussycats
Road Runner
Scooby Doo (pre-Scrappy)

What do cartoons have to do with my parenting philosophy? Not a dang thing! But I do like snuggling with my girl while she watches SpongeBob (ish) and Danny Phantom.

Posted by: Laura | July 27, 2007 7:34 AM

Tom and Jerry. I kept watching just to see the cat win, to no avail.

Garfield and friends. I'm still a fan of Garfield, even though now I see how lame the comic is, and I'm sure the cartoon is just as bad now, if it's still on.

Thundercats! Who didn't love them?

Captain Planet: Yes, I know it's lame, but he's a hero! Gonna take pollution down to zero! And they had to represent all five major races in the world, so they gave the little Hispanic guy the power of "heart." What was that about? The power to make the evil corporate conglomerate leader feel a tingle in his left arm every time he was thwarted by CP and friends?

Bugs, the old standby. I recently saw some very old Bugs Bunny cartoons on YouTube, labeled as extremely racist. They depicted "blackies" as in a minstrel show, and Asian people as yellow caricatures with slanty eyes, terrible accents, and overal goofy characteristics. Watching them now, they do strike me as racist, but I remember seeing the same cartoons as a kid, and not thinking anything about it.

Posted by: Mona | July 27, 2007 7:47 AM

Smurfs. But talk about a lack of balance. There was one woman.

Posted by: K | July 27, 2007 7:50 AM

"Cartoons constitute our shared history, our culture, at least for kids born after 1960."

Here we go with the tunnel vision, again.

Cartoons have been aroung LONG before 1960!

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 7:53 AM

Is this the topic for the WHOLE day?

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 8:02 AM

Loved the Jetsons and the Flintstones. We were just telling our kids about the Flintstones. They eat those vitamins but have no idea who the characters are. They watch Playhouse Disney animated stuff which is very cute but not the same. I can't say any cartoon watching influenced my views on gender roles or parenting but it was fun. I just added the Flintstones lst season DVD to my Netflix queue. It'll be a hoot to pass this along to my kids.

Posted by: PT Fed Mof2 | July 27, 2007 8:09 AM

The Big Book of Jewish Sports Heros: An Illustrated Compendium of Sports History & The 150 Greatest Jewish Sports Stars (Paperback)
by Peter S. Horvitz - 295 pages (2006)

Jewish Sports Legends: The International Jewish Hall of Fame (Jewish Sports Legends) (Paperback)
by Joseph Siegman - 278 pages (2005)

Great Jews In Sports (Hardcover)
by Robert Slater - 368 pages (2005)

Jewish Sports Stars: Athletic Heroes Past And Present (General Jewish Interest) (Paperback)
by David J. Goldman - 96 pages (2006)

Jews Who Rock (Paperback)
by Guy Oseary - 224 pages (2000)

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 8:17 AM

Wonder twin powers, ACTIVATE!

I loved Saturday cartoons because it was pretty much the only time we were able to watch tv for more than an hour. I remember Smurfs, Captain Caveman, Hong Kong Phooey, Fat Albert, so many more, too many to recount. My absolute favorites were Schoolhouse Rock, Scooby Doo, and all the Warner Brothers classics.

Are there still Saturday cartoons? I guess with Noggin and the Cartoon Network and PBS Kids, you can always watch cartoons, so it takes away the specialness.

Posted by: WorkingMomX | July 27, 2007 8:19 AM

Hey Leslie - what the heck is a titch? Me, being of advanced age, figured it was some urban slang or something (one of those words my kids would laugh at me for not knowing), so I looked up the definition (hate to seem ignorant on these blogs and ask something that everyone else knows the answer to). The definition I found was "small person", which doesn't make sense. So, is this a mispelling? Or am I truly ignorant today?

Posted by: jj | July 27, 2007 8:21 AM

I grew up with rocky & bullwinkle. In reality, I think Homer has it figured out, let the kids bump and scrape themselves, and when called upon, rescue them, otherwise, work on the couch butt groove while downing another cold one ;)

Posted by: @My Wits End | July 27, 2007 8:25 AM

"Watching them now, they do strike me as racist, but I remember seeing the same cartoons as a kid, and not thinking anything about it."
Or violent. It only stroke me when I found my (then) 18 month son, usually a calm and peaceful toddler, repeatedly hitting a chair very hard with one of his toys. It turned out that Tom & Jerry (one of my childhood favorites) was on the TV and he was role-playing while he was watching...
The kind of "physical violence" in those cartoons is actually very well depicted by "The Itchy and Scratchy Show" - the only part of The Simpsons I can't stand to watch!

Posted by: portuguese mother | July 27, 2007 8:27 AM

jj -- I suspect touch. Tho to me it's "tetch." :-)

Posted by: Laura | July 27, 2007 8:28 AM

"Are there still Saturday cartoons? I guess with Noggin and the Cartoon Network and PBS Kids, you can always watch cartoons, so it takes away the specialness."

WMX - you read my mind. Remember how much you looked forward to Saturday morning? Jumping out of bed, eating cereal from the box while mom and dad slept. How awesome was that? I do think that the ever present availability of it makes it less special. When we tell our kids that cartoons were only on for an hour after school sometimes (woody woodpecker for me) and Saturday morning AND that we only had 3 channels - they look at us blank faced. I think it is probably the same face I give my father when he talks about the outhouse. I realized the other day that while we still say "roll down the window" - my kids have never seen a window that lowers with anything but a button. How did I get so old???

Don't get me started on the awesome after school specials most notably the two with Helen Hunt - Quarterback Princess and the one where she does Angel Dust (does anyone still do angel dust?)

Posted by: Moxiemom | July 27, 2007 8:30 AM

I liked Schoolhouse Rock. And they're now on DVD. I don't know how it relates to work/life balance but I do like how it's educational but still just FUN. Oh yeah, and the kids like them too.

Posted by: Rockville Mom | July 27, 2007 8:32 AM

Laura - thanks - you're probably right - I tried to think of what word she meant to type, and kept coming up with words that rhyme with titch, none of which seemed appropriate...

Posted by: jj | July 27, 2007 8:33 AM

Or maybe it should have been a "smidge"

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 8:35 AM

Boa tarde(!), mãe portuguesa.

Posted by: catlady | July 27, 2007 8:48 AM

No one's posted? Am I really first?

I love the Simpsons. I hate pretty much all of the other cartoons on at prime time (King of the Hill, Futurama, American Dad, Family Guy--they're all terrible. South Park is good, though).

One of my favorite episodes is when Lisa is trying to protect the oldest tree in Springfield. I also like the one where Homer becomes obese and works from home. "I'm sorry, but your fingers are too fat. To obtain a special dialing wand, please mash the keypad now."

Cartoons today seem much stupider than the ones I watched as a kid, but I am certainly out of the cartoon loop.

Posted by: Meesh | July 27, 2007 8:49 AM

Moxiemom -- you captured the Saturday mornings of my youth perfectly. Cereal from the box on the couch. What a life. And I remember the after school specials very well, loved Helen in football getup, and I remember one called "My Mom's Having a Baby" or something like that. Good times.

Posted by: WorkingMomX | July 27, 2007 8:49 AM

I was not a huge cartoon fan as a kid, but AM a huge Simpson fan. My all time favorite line from the series is from the episode where Marge (mistakenly) is jailed for a couple of days - she is is the chow line, and the other inmates are complaining bitterly about the food - Marge just picks up a tray and says "Gee, its so nice not to have to cook!".

Posted by: mommywarvet | July 27, 2007 8:50 AM

Ah, guess not. That elusive first post remains beyond my grasp.

Posted by: Meesh | July 27, 2007 8:51 AM

I lived for Super Friends and Scooby Doo on Saturday mornings.

My son likes Captain Planet, Justice League, Teen Titans (no longer on), Krypto the super/wonder Dog.

Dh is against SpongeBob stating the cartoon offers nothing of substance.

Posted by: 2xmami | July 27, 2007 8:51 AM

elxperience???

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 8:52 AM

Mona, we must be around the same age because I remember all of those cartoons. Garfield and Friends was AWESOME! I would watch it now if I could. What was the name of the gray kitty? Nermal? I also really liked G.I. Joe. Knowing really IS half the battle.

Fraggle Rock was also great. I saw it discussed on I Love the 80s and and it struck me that the Fraggles were total potheads who constantly had the munchies. I wonder what my parents thought of that show.

Posted by: Meesh | July 27, 2007 8:58 AM

Stewie is hilarious. He's the only baby I like!

Posted by: Yay for Stewie! | July 27, 2007 8:59 AM

Davy and Goliath rocked!

I heart Gumby and Pokey.

Mr. Bill on SLN was cute.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 9:11 AM

Borrrrrrring!!!! This relates to balance how? Leslie, maybe you could have a topic one day about teens balancing work and school. When I worked as a college student, I worked with many teens whose parents forced them to quit because their grades fell. The reality was that these kids were partying, drinking and doing drugs and that is why their grades fell. Why some parents don't want to instill the value of hard work in their children these days I'll never understand. Just a thought!

Posted by: Florida Chick | July 27, 2007 9:11 AM

I liked the smurfs and fraggle rock. I think I was in 7th grade when the Simpsons came out and I've watched them ever since. We are going to see the movie tonight.

I have to say that some of the cartoons my daughter watches are so much better than the cartoons that I used to watch. It just seems like they try to teach them so much more. She watched Sponge Bob, Jimmy Neutron and Dora.

Posted by: scarry | July 27, 2007 9:11 AM

"I always have felt a titch sorry for American kids who grew up in intellectually superior homes without televisions, . . ."

Posted by Leslie Morgan Steiner '87 | July 27, 2007; 7:00 AM ET

Intellectually superior has nothing to do with it. I grew up in a family that could not afford a television set until I was 11 years old. And our children grew up without TV because there are not enough hours in the day that any of us can afford to spend them staring at a cathode ray tube when we can be outside tossing the ball around.

But don't feel sorry for kids without TV, Leslie. I had, and our kids had, plenty of comic books. I had a subscription to Walt Disney's Comics and Stories. That's the monthly that started out each issue with a ten-page Donald Duck story by Carl Barks, and ended with a Mickey Mouse detective serial story. In between were the Li'l Bad Wolf and sometimes Bucky Bug, plus reprints of Donald Duck and Mickey Mouse Sunday newspaper strips. My brother had a subscription to Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies, which began each issue with Bugs Bunny and concluded with Elmer Fudd, with Daffy Duck and Henery Hawk in between. The third monthly, which we usually bought at Sarin's newsstand up the block, was Walter Lantz's New Funnies. The cover and the lead story featured Andy Panda and Charlie Chicken. New Funnies also featured Homer Pigeon (with his girlfriend, Carrie Pigeon), as well as Oswald the Rabbit. Unlike characters like Mickey Mouse, Donald Duck and Daisy Duck who had no children of their own, but rather nephews and nieces (Huey, Dewey &Louie; Morty & Ferdie; April, May & June), Oswald was depicted as a parent, with sons Floyd and Lloyd who called him, "Poppa Oswald."

In my day, these comics were not racist. However, when I grew up and had the opportunity to buy old issues of Walter Lantz's New Funnies, I found that issues from the early 1940s featured Raggedy Ann and Andy (OK) and a character named Little Eight Ball (not OK; his name says it all).

Our children also had the Archie comics, including Archie, Pep, Archie's Pals & Gals, Betty & Veronica, Josie, Reggie and Jughead. Our kids had single-sex educations, as commended by Leslie a few days ago. In the Archie comics, they saw how things went in the coeducational world of Riverdale High School, where the principal, Mr. Wetherbee, supervised teachers like Miss Grundy and Professor Flutesnoot as well as Coach Kleats and the cook, Miss Beazley (sp?).

According to writers like Marie Day ("The Plug-in Drug"), TV cartoons move at a breakneck pace, with cuts every few seconds. Comic book reading, by contrast, proceeds at the child's own pace. Give me a comic book over a TV cartoon any day.

Posted by: Matt in Aberdeen | July 27, 2007 9:11 AM

Warner Brothers in general.

My favourite cartoon ever is the one with the bulldog and the little black and white kitten.

We saw it "again" on the big screen in "Monsters, Inc."

I never cared for Tweety Bird or Road Runner, personally.

I love Foghorn Leghorn and the dog. Too funny.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 9:12 AM

Borrrrrrring!!!!

Same goes for you topic, it's Friday, relax.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 9:13 AM

Matt, we also loved our comic books. I, of course, loved the Archie series. I also loved the Silver Surfer and X-Men.

My brother collected a bunch of them and still has them to this day.

We would spend hours on the weekend at Big Planet Comics (anyone remember it?).
On average, we probably spent 5 hours reading comic books to every 1 hour of watching TV. I have fond memories of both.

Posted by: Meesh | July 27, 2007 9:18 AM

LOOOOOOOVE Foghorn Leghorn! Love him!

Posted by: Moxiemom | July 27, 2007 9:23 AM

Speed Racer!

Johnny Quest!

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 9:25 AM

Oh yeah, Thundercats and Kimba, the White Lion too.

Did anyone else spend waaayyy too much time on Saturdays watching "Matinee at the Bijou"? I saw some amazing old cartoons on that show, not to mention some awful old B movies. I also caught Siskel and Ebert in their early years.

I still remember when they reviewed "Mystic Pizza" and said that Julia Roberts was gonna be a big star.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 9:26 AM

This is a shout out to all those Duck Tales Fans.

Posted by: Matt | July 27, 2007 9:27 AM

Moxiemom said: "Don't get me started on the awesome after school specials most notably the two with Helen Hunt - Quarterback Princess and the one where she does Angel Dust (does anyone still do angel dust?)"

While I don't know the answer to the angel dust question, I can say that I adored after-school specials, and Helen Hunt made an impression on me when I was a young woman, close to her age. I adored the Quarterback Princess movie - and loved it when she re-appeared on television as a grown-up in "Mad About You".

Cartoon-wise, my whole family is addicted to Bugs Bunny and the whole clan - Road Runner, Sylvester and Tweety, etc. Thanks to the magic of DVDs, my twin 5 year old boys equally adore them, 'specially Sylvester and Tweety.

Re: Saturday morning cartoons: we have kept Saturday morning special by making that the ONLY day of the week that Mom and Dad do NOT watch the news in the morning. The kids, particularly the littles, have control of the remote (to a VERY short extent, but nevertheless!). That is when they catch up on SpongeBob, Backyardigans, and Discovery Channel's Kenny The Shark.

By the way - Kenny is a phenomenally funny cartoon, very reminiscent of the 70s/80s cartoons.

Posted by: 4BoysinStafford | July 27, 2007 9:29 AM

So many great cartoons, how do I pick?

* Loved the early weekday/Sunday old-school stuff like "Perils of Pauline" and Hanna-Barbera

* After school was all about He-Man, G.I. Joe (hi Meesh!) and Transformers. I remember doing a "self-esteem" exercise in class in 5th grade where we had to pick a fictional character we'd like to be, and I chose Lady Jaye from G.I. Joe. When we played Barbies, I was her and my sister was always Scarlett.

* Saturday morning was Smurfs, Gummi Bears, Dungeons & Dragons, Kidd Video (remember them? then you're an X-er!) and so many more I can't remember. WorkingMomX and MoxieMom, you were dead-on with Saturday morning memories!

Speaking of which, I think Saturday morning cartoons aren't as fun now. (Though I do like Little Bill a lot) It seems the talk shows (GMA, Today Show, etc.) have claimed that territory; it's too bad for kids. And some of the ones that are on I don't like -- Winx & Bratz are bad body-image-wise.

Portugues mother, I'm with you on the Itchy & Scratchy. My husband only this year finally called me on the fact that I always turn away and look at something else when they're on. I know, I'm a dork. :)

Posted by: NYLurker | July 27, 2007 9:31 AM

Foghorn gets my vote. I arrived to the United States in 1968 and my mother took us to introduce us to the neighbors one Saturday morning. The Moms chatted and there, in the living room, butterfly chairs, bean bags, poptarts from a box and Foghorn Leghorn on a COLOR tv! So many firsts that morning... The beginning of a long tradition with our new best friends. I barely understood a word in the cartoon but the sheer luxury of it was unforgettable. We spent the next 6 years watching cartoons each Saturday morning with those kids.

Posted by: notsonewtoblog | July 27, 2007 9:32 AM

Matt, thanks for reminding me about Duck Tales! Having a Scottish heritage made them doubly fun for me. :)

Posted by: NYLurker | July 27, 2007 9:34 AM

Just thought of another great Saturday morning cartoon - does anyone remember Laff-A-Lympics?
It had loads of great cartoon stars - all competing against each other in various, ultimately doomed contests, like flying to the moon, canoeing down whitewater rapids, and driving cross-country.
That was a huge fave of mine...

Posted by: 4BoysinStafford | July 27, 2007 9:35 AM

Re: titch.

I think Laura is right, that I meant "tetch."

I use "titch" to mean "a small thing." I got it from the children's book "Titch." But it isn't in the dictionary so I defer to Laura here.

Posted by: Leslie | July 27, 2007 9:41 AM

LOOOOOOOVE Foghorn Leghorn! Love him!


__________________________

Me, too. "This boy's as strong as an ox...and almost as smart."

"That boy's more mixed up than a feather in a wirlwind."

That gal reminds me of the highway between Dallas and Ft. Worth -- no curves.

This'll cause more confusion than a mouse at a burlesque show.

He's so dumb, he thinks a pig pen is something to write with.

"That boah's about as sharp as a bowlin' ball".

"This here's a chicken...D...O...G, chicken!"

Posted by: Army Brat | July 27, 2007 9:42 AM

Three cheers for Foghorn Leghorn!!!

We recently switched to FIOS TV. We get the "Boomerang" channel now -- all the old cartoons. My kids have decided they like all the old cartoons better than the new ones!

Posted by: SLP | July 27, 2007 9:43 AM

Duck Tales! (ooOOooh!) Way better than that Darkwing Duck show that stole Launchpad McQuack and made him suck.
Muppet Babies every Saturday morning... Bullwinkle every weekday night on Nickelodeon when I could catch it.
Anything by Tezuka, especially Unico, Kimba the White Lion and Astro Boy since I was about 3. He's a true master, and now that I'm a grown up I read his more "adult" comic boks (Buddha is particularly outstanding).
Of course, I still watch cartoons, esp. Simpsons and anything by Studio Ghibli or Brad Bird (Iron Giant!!!)
And shows that weren't cartoons but might as well have been, like The Muppet Show and Get Smart (not a huge fan of Insp. Gadget, but LOVE Get Smart).
It's funny looking back. I was mostly obsessed with reading books as a kid, but now that I think about it I DID watch a LOT of TV!!!

Posted by: LTLFTW | July 27, 2007 9:48 AM

VEGGIETALES!

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 9:49 AM

Ooh!! Cartoon day. Yay!!

Of course my favorite was The Flintstones. The themes, though, as I remember, tended to be pretty grown up themes. Gender dynamics, financial issues (there was one where Barney was the Repo man, and Fred was behind on his tv payments), MIL issues (I remember Fred hated his MIL), getting along with the neighbor issues, and baby issues of course, including adoption (Bam Bam was adopted). I recently rented the DVDs so that my son could watch, and he loved the show also. To me, it's a classic.

I also loved the Jetsons, Yogi Bear, Speed Racer, Josie and the Pussycats, Scooby Doo, Bullwinkle, Bugs Bunny and Road Runner, Daffy Duck, Kimba the White Lion, and the Superhero shows. And yes, cartoons were much more special when I was growing up, because they just were not on all the time like they are now. Now, with cable, kids can watch cartoons almost all the time, if we let them.

At home, we limit tv to certain cartoons, including SpongeBob, Cyberchase, Arthur (also a classic), and Avatar. We all love Avatar and make a point of watching it together, which makes it special.

Posted by: Emily | July 27, 2007 9:49 AM

Muppet Babies were cute...He-Man, Shera, Scooby-Doo.

Speaking of cartoons, the hubby and I just watched Who Framed Roger Rabbit for the first time in ages. It's so funny how the cartoons really are made for adults. A lot of that stuff flies over kid's heads.

Oh, and I adore Pinky and the Brain! :-)

Posted by: JRS | July 27, 2007 9:51 AM

The most educational cartoon of recent times: Animaniacs! It was a Steven Spielberg creation, had a 40-piece orchestra doing the score for every episode, and was famous for "educational" songs set to classic tunes. My kids learned their state capitals from "Wakko's America" (set to "Turkey in the Straw")and of course, "The Presidents" set to the tune of the "William Tell Overture".

Posted by: Army Brat | July 27, 2007 9:52 AM

I've rediscovered "Dinosaurs" on DVD.

The baby's voice is "Elmo", and Christopher Meloni is "Spike".

I remember the Muppet Show--funny stuff.

I also posted my votes at 9:12 and 9:26. I thought I had signed.

Thanks for the Dungeons & Dragons reminder too.

Posted by: Maryland Mother | July 27, 2007 9:54 AM

Peanuts.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 9:54 AM

My kids love the original Jonny Quest series from the mid-1960s (as did I...perhaps it's genetic).
Only 28 episodes in the DVD box set, but very high quality animation, nefarious (but usually human) villains, exotic settings, and utterly devoid of any PC sensibilities which have crept into pop culture in the past generation.

Posted by: MrAtoZ | July 27, 2007 9:57 AM

Yawn............

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 9:58 AM

Re Leslie's "or those in adventurous diplomatic or military families who spent significant parts of their childhoods living in exotic, enriching locations abroad."

The highlight of many Saturdays for three and a half years: the Saturday Matinee at the Family Theater in Perlacher Forst Housing Area, where they would show a Looney Tunes cartoon before the movie! Sometimes two! Twenty-five cents to get in; 10 cents for popcorn (12 if you wanted butter) and 10 cents for a coke.

When you're a kid, that "enriching, exotic location" sometimes takes a back seat to what you remember best about "home".

Posted by: Army Brat | July 27, 2007 9:58 AM

MrAtoZ

May I guess--Anuszkiewicz?

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 9:58 AM

Semi-off-topic plug:

Bengies drive-in theatre. They always show some cartoons before the double or triple-feature.

It's worth the hike (buy the bumpersticker too!).

www.bengies.com

Posted by: Maryland Mother | July 27, 2007 10:00 AM

I would agree that Johnny Quest was great. Interesting sign of the times...I remember that being a girl, I didn't advertise to friends that I like Johnny Quest -- I was afraid my friends would laugh at me!

Posted by: SLP | July 27, 2007 10:02 AM

I was deprived and scarred for life because my parents were anti-TV, so I could pick an hour and a half, but no more, of Saturday morning cartoons. This, of course, made me treasure my TV time all the more, LOL. Great memories: Sam Sheepdog and Ralph Wolf, Sylvester and Tweety, on Loony Tunes, Josie and the Pussycats, Scooby Doo, and the Banana Splits.

Underdog bugged the heck out of me.

Back in the Dark Ages when I was a kid, Bullwinkle and Yogi Bear were the only shows broadcast on Sunday morning (other than preachers and -- I think, but don't actually remember -- news shows). If I was sick on Sunday, my TV options were so bad, I'd pretend to be well so I could get out of the house and go to church, LOL. That's just how much I abhorred Bullwinkle and Yogi Bear.

Posted by: Megan's Neighbor | July 27, 2007 10:03 AM

". . . Walter Lantz's New Funnies. The cover and the lead story featured Andy Panda and Charlie Chicken. New Funnies also featured Homer Pigeon (with his girlfriend, Carrie Pigeon), as well as Oswald the Rabbit."

How could I have left out Woody Woodpecker?

Posted by: Matt in Aberdeen | July 27, 2007 10:04 AM

Winx & Bratz - Why do all the girls in girl cartoons look like they just got off the pole? I know that's another blog for another day, but makes me crazy. Those Winx are awful!

Person with the FIOS - how is it? I hear it is amazing.

Army Brat - LOL - I'm going to start using those sayings daily.

Emily - we love Cyberchase too. Its about the only thing that I will almost always say yes to.

Emily raises a good point about family viewing. We have been hitting the discovery channel and travel channels a lot for things we can all enjoy and watch like Dirty Jobs, Man vs. Wild (what nasty thing will he eat this time), Cash Cab (kids are impressed with my knowledge). What have you all found to watch as a family that is entertaining to all?

Posted by: Moxiemom | July 27, 2007 10:04 AM

Yeah, Meesh, Nermal was his name. I like to think my cats are the same...I have one big fat one who's a gluttonous curmudgeon, and one cute adorable little tiger-stripe who's the biggest love bug ever. And the fat one hates the little one, but she's never tried to ship her off to Abu Dhabi.

Posted by: Mona | July 27, 2007 10:05 AM

Nothing better than getting up on saturday, filling a big bowl with chocolate cocoa puffs and watching 3 hours of cartoons with my sister, mesmerized and filled with sugar!

Posted by: Those were the days! | July 27, 2007 10:10 AM

I remember how much violence was in those cartoons. Every one was hit, blown up, had a rock thrown on them etc. I loved them! Now I must admit that i wouldn't let my kids watch them. Funny how time changes your views.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 10:15 AM

Can I introduce a "balance" type issue? None of the cartoons I watch nowadays (Simpsons, Family Guy, King of the Hill, the occasional American Dad) has a mom of young children who works. Peggy Hill does, but Bobby's in school. Lois gives lessons, but in her home where Stewie's there. Marge has worked occasionally, but the day care is portrayed as frightening (the Ayn Rand school that Maggie had to escape from). I think that since cartoons are the bulk of my TV time, that's what's reinforicing to me that not being home with kids is bad. (Even though I struggle to believe otherwise) Lots of sitcoms are like that too. Anybody else notice this, and feel affected by it?

B/t/w another one I left off the list -- Jem! (I always kind of felt bad for the Misfits . . . and thought their songs were cooler)

Posted by: NYLurker | July 27, 2007 10:16 AM

Posted by: NYLurker | July 27, 2007 10:16 AM

We try to monitor what the kids watch. Spongebob is absolutely forbidden. Any shows where bad behavior is seen as ok, backtalking, dad is a moron, mom is a moron, etc is a no no.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 10:20 AM

My brother and I could each choose one cartoon on Saturday morning - after our mom was awake and knew we were watching. So, we'd get up really early and get a fix before she knew. Shazam and Isis were our favorites. HR Puff n Stuff was really scary! Does anyone remember this odd show on Saturday mornings where a teenage boy went into the magician's place and fell into the magic hat upon which he was suddenly in the land of hats - all the characters were hats and the "bad guy" was the mad hatter? I think it was called Lidsville, but I was about four and don't remember for sure. I'm certain the writers of this show were sampling some mind altering substances.

Even as a kid I disliked the shows where the boy characters got to have all the fun and the girl characters were merely decorative. No Smurfs for me! I hope that's improved since the 1960's but the few shows my kids watch don't seem to confirm my hopes. One thing I inherited from my mom is an intense dislike of screeching by tv characters. She loathed Laverne & Shirley for that reason and now I can't abide some of the Disney shows that have a lot of screeching either. Yikes, I am like my mother ...

Posted by: Stacey | July 27, 2007 10:22 AM

Moxie, my daughter's current favorite (non-cartoon) show, believe it or not, is "How it's Made," which I believe is on the science channel. She's 6 and is very into figuring out how everything works, and dad's an engineer, so they both snuggle together, fascinated by the cogs and gears and machinery. Yeah, doomed to geekhood, I know.

Side story: she recently chose a library book called something like "It's Not the Stork," so we've now entered the world of embarrassing car conversations -- a week ago, it was "mommy, what does s-c-r-o-t ---- spell?" My ever-so-helpful husband looked at me and said "all yours". The hardest part was not busting out laughing.

Posted by: Laura | July 27, 2007 10:26 AM

Wait until she says loudly and clearly, "Wait a minute--you mean you and daddy had SEX?! EWWWW! That's GROSS! How COULD YOU!"

That will either happen in line at a bank, or in the grocery store.

That will give you the opportunity to use this parental tactic, "Oh, excuse me little girl/boy, let me help you find your mommy."

Then hustle out of the there, hoping no one recognized you.

Posted by: anon this time | July 27, 2007 10:29 AM

NYLurker - "Fairly OddParents"; Mom's a real estate agent. (It sets up Timmy getting baby-sat by Vicky a lot)

Also, one of the things my youngest daughter likes about "SpongeBob SquarePants" is Sandy, the squirrel, who comes from Texas and lives underwater in her air bubble/house. Sandy takes no nonsense from anyone - "better not mess with Texas, boy!"

Posted by: Army Brat | July 27, 2007 10:30 AM

I've had the DVD collections of Animaniacs and Pinky and the Brain on my Amazon wishlist for almost TWO YEARS, and no one has taken the hint.

My husband frequently comes home and greets me with "helllooooo nurse!", and I often put on a dopey cockney accent and ask him "What are we going to do tonight, Brain?" I can tell you, no one-liners from Will & Grace have ever penetrated our lexicon so well.

I hope my kids will have cartoons that are half as clever and funny as those two were. If not, it's a special two hours of DVDs every Saturday morning! I'll get all the old Looney Toons, maybe some of the Hanna-Barbera, definitely Fraggle Rock.

Posted by: WDC | July 27, 2007 10:33 AM

10:29, I know that day is coming. Expected it when her little brother arrived not quite 2 years ago, but just telling her about the egg and sperm was enough. Now that the subject has come up again, she has moved on to "but how does the sperm GET to the egg?" Luckily, we got home before things got too, umm, detailed. But won't be long before the last puzzle piece clicks into place. . . .

Posted by: Laura | July 27, 2007 10:34 AM

NY Lurker,
I can think of a few cartoons with working moms also. Arthur's mother is an accountant. Caillou's mom also works (although my son outgrew that show a while ago). My son also watches the Suite Life of Zack and Cody sometimes, and their mother works as a hotel singer (she is also a single mother).

Posted by: Emily | July 27, 2007 10:36 AM

Wait until she says loudly and clearly, "Wait a minute--you mean you and daddy had SEX?! EWWWW! That's GROSS! How COULD YOU!"

Also, for those who conceive a child on a holiday, wait till the kid learns to count backwards nine months from their birthday.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 10:37 AM

Laura - we love How its Made too so you are not alone in your geekdom!

Re: the stork book. Have you given your 6 yr. old the ahem, "specifics" on sex yet? We are debating that here. I'd love to see what others think. Lots of moms in the burbs wait, i think too long, but we've been hedging since once I let the cat out of the bag, I'm sure my older will tell my younger and they will both share with the whole neighborhood just like I did in 1st grade.

Posted by: Moxiemom | July 27, 2007 10:37 AM

Laugh. I say, laugh, boy! It's a joke!

Posted by: Working Dad | July 27, 2007 10:37 AM

I grew up in Venezuela in the mid to late 1970s and early 1980s and remember the American cartoons that made it down there (dubbed with the same Spanish voices as all the sitcoms, and funny enough, we also only had three channels) - Flintstones, Jetsons, Loony Tunes, Tom & Jerry, Smurfs, Fantastic Four, Superfriends, Laff-alympics, Speedracer, Scooby Doo, Road Runner to name a few. The holes in my pop cultural literacy come more from missing key sitcoms (though even many of those made it down - Love Boat, Three's Company, Happy Days, Charlie's Angels, Wonder Woman, etc).

I just recently discovered Boomerang from Cartoon Network - the cable channel that shows all of these classic cartoons. My five year old likes the Flintstones and Tom & Jerry, but I actually prefer the Noggin & Sprout & PBS Kids shows for her.

Posted by: not too deprived abroad | July 27, 2007 10:41 AM

I had to give my son the specifics on sex very recently. He was asking a lot of questions and someone had given him some vague information that I wanted to clarify. We rented the PBS Nova tape for it called "Life's Greatest Miracle." Some of it went over his head, but he got the general gist of it, and definitely understands the mechanics of sex. But the subject is treated in such a way that he did not respond with eeww, and just took it as part of how it works. He has not asked about it since, so I assume for the moment, he is satisfied with the information he was given.

Posted by: Emily | July 27, 2007 10:42 AM

anon @ 10:20: Why is SpongeBob forbidden? My kids have watched that show for years. I've never seen any behavior or examples that I didn't want my kids to see.

Posted by: Army Brat | July 27, 2007 10:43 AM

"Spongebob is absolutely forbidden."

What's wrong with spongebob? Really, am I missing something about the cartoon? I think it is really funny. We watch fairly odd parents too. I try to limit cartoons to two hours a day.

Posted by: scarry | July 27, 2007 10:44 AM

NYLurker

"I think that since cartoons are the bulk of my TV time, that's what's reinforicing to me that not being home with kids is bad."

How old are you?

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 10:45 AM

Thanks for the idea Emily, how old is your son? I agree that treating it like everything else our bodies do is good.

Posted by: Moxiemom | July 27, 2007 10:47 AM

For the longest time, my husband did not want my son to watch SpongeBob. He did not know much about the show, but was generally annoyed by it because he thought the characters were loud and obnoxious. But my son would sneak it in now and then, and one day, I sat down with him to watch and figure out why it appealed to him so much. And I discovered that it truly is a funny and very witty show, and that SpongeBob is a really sweet character. So my husband was convinced to give it a shot, and now, he has no objections either. On the face of it, to someone who has never watched, the concept does seem a little silly, but the show is actually quite good.

Posted by: Emily | July 27, 2007 10:50 AM

Moxiemom,
My son is 7. We tried to be very matter of fact about it, and it seems to have worked.

Posted by: Emily | July 27, 2007 10:52 AM

Next emily will be putting a condom on a banana for her kid...

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 10:52 AM

Maybe the reason that NYlurker's bulk of TV time is cartoons is because she/he has kids. I watch an awful lot of cartoons.

Posted by: scarry | July 27, 2007 10:53 AM

I loved She-ra, He-man, GI Joe, Fraggle Rock, etc. These days hubby and I enjoy our Sunday night Fox cartoon fix with the Simpsons, etc., although I don't always enjoy watching Family Guy or American Dad.

I was a bit old for cartoons when it was on TV, but I also liked watching the original Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles cartoons with my little brothers.

I also remember two cartoons that I used to love but nobody else ever seems to remember- anyone here remember/hear of Seabert (about a seal) or Shirt Tales (I think that is what it was called- it was about 5 animals that lived in a tree in a park, and they had special powers when they put on their shirts?) Until someone else remembers these I'll think I've just made them up in my head :-)

Posted by: Carifly | July 27, 2007 10:57 AM

1. Rocky and Bullwinkle
2. Astro Boy

Posted by: Diane, Baltimore | July 27, 2007 10:58 AM

"Next emily will be putting a condom on a banana for her kid..."

Well, at least she's taking the time to explain it to her child, you know, being a parent?

Meanwhile your kid will learn about it through misinformation on the playground or God forbid the internet. And you'll have a 13 year-old parent on your hands.

Posted by: So? | July 27, 2007 10:59 AM

"Spongebob is absolutely forbidden."

What's wrong with spongebob? Really, am I missing something about the cartoon? I think it is really funny. We watch fairly odd parents too. I try to limit cartoons to two hours a day.

Posted by: scarry | July 27, 2007 10:44 AM


Spongebob is gay, look at his starfish sidekick. Dunno about the squirrel, but she looks kinda like Elen Degeneres.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 11:00 AM

Anon at 10:45 -- you can get a rough idea from my kid cartoon favorites. Did I forget to mention Voltron??

Thanks Emily & ArmyBrat for the suggestions. It's great that kids are getting these kinds of views in their cartoons. But I don't know if I'd ever watch them (unless I had a little one). I was thinking more about adult-oriented cartoons.

B/t/w who's up for Simpsons Movie this weekend?!

Posted by: NYLurker | July 27, 2007 11:02 AM

So? What you said. I don't want to be a grandma too soon either!

Posted by: Moxiemom | July 27, 2007 11:02 AM

Emily,

I am also baffled at what negative moral or behavioral message could be conveyed by SpongeBob.

We enjoy Avatar from time to time, but Naruto rules at our house these days. My 5 year old daughter loves it even more than her older brother. We like the ethos of the Asian cartoons. Dignity. Hard work. Doing the right thing. I'd much rather have my kids choose Asian animation over Disney's offerings like Hannah Montana and The Suite Life of Zach & Cody.

Posted by: MN | July 27, 2007 11:03 AM

"Spongebob is gay, look at his starfish sidekick. Dunno about the squirrel, but she looks kinda like Elen Degeneres."

Wow. And I take it you're a parent? I hope your kid doesn't turn out gay. You'll be the type who will disown them.

Yeah, stupid people really are breeding.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 11:03 AM

Gee, I guess I'll have to change my name, I'm de-lurking a lot today (and not getting much work done!).

Carifly, I remember Shirt T-t-t-tales! And along those lines Care Bears.

Posted by: NYLurker | July 27, 2007 11:05 AM

Spongebob is gay, look at his starfish sidekick. Dunno about the squirrel, but she looks kinda like Elen Degeneres.

Wow, between this and the banana comment, I don't know which one is sillier. He is not gay. He is a cartoon, why would anyone even be thinking about the sexuality of a cartoon.


Posted by: scarry | July 27, 2007 11:05 AM

My grandmother used 'tetched' to mean mentally unbalanced, crazy, as in 'You're tetched.'

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 11:06 AM

My 6 y.o. asked me what's a gay marriage. My answer was it's a marriage between 2 people of the same gender. He said "oh, I thought it's a marriage between a gay man and a gay woman". If they go to school they are already more educated then you think. We can hope they will ask us, at least to verify.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 11:06 AM

Wow, between this and the banana comment, I don't know which one is sillier. He is not gay. He is a cartoon, why would anyone even be thinking about the sexuality of a cartoon.

Posted by: scarry | July 27, 2007 11:05 AM

short memory. Recall the kurfluffle over whether Tinky Winky of Teletubbies was gay?

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 11:07 AM

NY Lurker, I have noticed that about prime time television shows. I don't watch kids shows, so I don't know about them.

While I don't feel affected by that, I would worry about kids picking up on it. Not that it's bad to see SAHMs portrayed, but it's not good to see only that choice.

I've even seen thinly veiled referenced to working moms being bad in dramas for adults. In an episode of CSI Miami, a baby sitter tries to "rescue" the baby she cares for because the mother is too busy to give it affection. Nevermind that the baby got tons of affection from the baby sitters. In a commercial for a cleaning product, the woman using the inferior product was a frazzled mom in a business suit. The woman using the superior product was a calm, smiling mom in a coordinated track suit. Hmmm...

Posted by: Meesh | July 27, 2007 11:07 AM

Moxie, we've followed her lead -- she likes to understand how things work, so we've answered her questions on that level; she's a pretty logical creature, so she pretty much just filed the answers away and checked one more thing off her "things to understand" list. That's been fairly easy, if a little embarrassing.

The hard part has been now that the "other" stuff is starting to creep in. For example, we were talking about a book or show where a baby was adopted, and I explained what that was. And she asked, "but how do you make a baby if you don't want a baby?" Like I said, she's a pretty logical creature, so she just couldn't understand why you'd do the stuff to make a baby if you didn't actually want to make a baby. Ummm, errr, well. . . .

Posted by: Laura | July 27, 2007 11:08 AM

Spongebob is gay, look at his starfish sidekick. Dunno about the squirrel, but she looks kinda like Elen Degeneres.

_________________________

Actually, SpongeBob has quite a crush on Sandy, the female squirrel. Patrick is his pal that lives next door.

Mr. Krabs has a daughter; Plankton has a wife.
Go fish in another pond; Bikini Bottom is not for you!

Posted by: Gutless Coward | July 27, 2007 11:09 AM

"Recall the kurfluffle over whether Tinky Winky of Teletubbies was gay?"

Oi. That was perpetuated by Jerry Falwell, so consider the source. I'm waiting for the allegations of altar-boy type abuse to surface now that the dumb*ss has kicked the bucket.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 11:10 AM

scarry

"I watch an awful lot of cartoons."

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 11:13 AM

SpongeBob:

DH doesn't think that Patrick being a male charachter should be pink. Well, he is a starfish, what color should Patrick be??

Had I known this was an issue I would not have purchased a bedding set for our son who likes the show. So sad, too bad - long live Patrick!

Posted by: 2xmami | July 27, 2007 11:15 AM

My friend had her daughter with her for an OB appointmnet, and the subject of how she got pregnant came up in the car. By the time my friend had answered all of her daughter's questions they had arrived at the doctor's office, and the daughter had a detailed understanding of the whole process. They walked into the lobby and waited for the elevator in silence. The elevator arrived, and my friend and her daughter squeezed in along with the others waiting. Just as the doors were about to close, the daughter turned to her mom and announced in front of everyone, "Well, I'm sure you're glad you got pregnant so you won't have to do THAT with daddy anymore." Out of the mouths of babes...

Posted by: birds and bees | July 27, 2007 11:16 AM

short memory. Recall the kurfluffle over whether Tinky Winky of Teletubbies was gay?

I didn't have kids then, so I guess I didn't pay attention. Gay people don't bother me. I am teaching my children to respect all people who are good no matter what their race, ethnicity, or sexual preference.

Posted by: scarry | July 27, 2007 11:16 AM

I hope Scarry was joking when she said she was TRYING to limit cartoons to 2 hours a day.

With a preschool kid, who sleeps 10 h/day (from 9PM to 7AM), it's 14 hours of consciousness left. An hour for dinner, half an hour for lunch and breakfast each, that's 8 left. Preparing meals, cleaning up after meals and around the house, doing laundry, etc. - another 2 hours gone. Taking a kid for a walk or park: at least another hour. Plus one more for running errands. Give a bath, read a nightime story: another hour gone. Miscellaneous transitions eat an hour between them.

Now we have exactly 2 hours left. And this time should be spent watching cartoons, not in the library, or doing art, or cooking together (my time allocation of half an hour for lunch would not allow it), or even watching a good movie?

If Scarry is a working parent, her working hours and any interaction with her hausband bring us into a negative time zone.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 11:21 AM

Laura - Yikes - don't want to get into the "recreational" aspect of sex yet! I do think its important to keep that door open. If they sense that you are embarassed and don't want to talk, they won't come to you. Thanks for the tips. Love the story birds and bees.

Posted by: Moxiemom | July 27, 2007 11:24 AM

"B/t/w who's up for Simpsons Movie this weekend?!"

I have several hot dates, but let me know next week how the movie turns out....

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 11:24 AM

I'm glad you remember Shirt Tales, NYLurker! I've been asking friends for years about it (whenever we start discussing, remember when...)and I've always come up empty handed.

I remember when Cartoon Network first started and I thought I'd get to see the cartoons I watched growing up and was disappointed. Now with the beauty of DVDs I can watch them all again. I do get a kick out of walking down the toy aisle and seeing how many things have been brought back (care bears, strawberry shortcake, etc).

Posted by: Carifly | July 27, 2007 11:24 AM

This is stupid. Has nothing to do with balance. Skipping today.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 11:25 AM

Amen, scarry. Who cares if Patrick is gay, or that teletubby? I think it would be neat to have a gay character interacting normally with all the other characters on a cartoon. It would show a healthy attitude toward differences and promote acceptance (as long as the character weren't horribly stereotypical).

I expect to see that in my lifetime.

Posted by: Meesh | July 27, 2007 11:25 AM

anon @ 11:21 obviously failed math. 14 minus one, minus one-half, minus another one-half, leaves 8?

Regardless, that wasn't an accurate summary of our day when our kids were pre-school age.

Posted by: Army Brat | July 27, 2007 11:27 AM

"An hour for dinner, half an hour for lunch and breakfast each, that's 8 left. Preparing meals, cleaning up after meals and around the house, doing laundry, etc. - another 2 hours gone. Taking a kid for a walk or park: at least another hour. Plus one more for running errands. Give a bath, read a nightime story: another hour gone. Miscellaneous transitions eat an hour between them."

Look under "straw man" in the dictionary, and the above comment is what you'll find.

I assume you are childless since few children take 60 minutes for dinner or 30 minutes for lunch. The more important issue, though, is that you divvy up the hours in the day according to your priorities (2 hours for meal preparation??) and then condescendingly conclude that scarry's choices are problematic.

Interesting approach to life. Apply inapplicable assumptions to other parents' choices, then conclude other parents have a problem.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 11:27 AM

"Wonder twin powers, ACTIVATE!

I loved Saturday cartoons because it was pretty much the only time we were able to watch tv for more than an hour. I remember Smurfs, Captain Caveman, Hong Kong Phooey, Fat Albert, so many more, too many to recount. My absolute favorites were Schoolhouse Rock, Scooby Doo, and all the Warner Brothers classics.

Are there still Saturday cartoons? I guess with Noggin and the Cartoon Network and PBS Kids, you can always watch cartoons, so it takes away the specialness."

Exactly what I was thinking!

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 11:28 AM

We've been watching Speed Racer, the Pink Panther, Rocky & Bullwinkle, and Pinky & the Brain with our 7 year old daughter (bought the DVD's from Amazon). My husband just asked for the DVD of something called Wacky Movies (I'd never heard of this one). And I have to admit - when I was 9 or so, I loved Justice League of America - I had a crush on Aquaman.

Posted by: Cat | July 27, 2007 11:29 AM

This is stupid. Has nothing to do with balance. Skipping today.

Posted by: | July 27, 2007 11:25 AM

Well thanks so much for telling us, gutless coward. If you can't even assign a name to a departure e-mail, you must be an invertebrate.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 11:31 AM

Starfish reproduce asexually.

Posted by: Re: Patrick the Starfish | July 27, 2007 11:34 AM

"I hope Scarry was joking when she said she was TRYING to limit cartoons to 2 hours a day. "

Oh, it's a lot more than 2 hours a day.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 11:36 AM

SpongeBob is a great show.

Along the educational lines, my three kids have learned a ton from:

CyberChase (math and logic)
Dora (spanish)
ZooBoMaFoo (animals)

Posted by: Leslie | July 27, 2007 11:38 AM

Am I the only one who's going to bring up SCHOOLHOUSE ROCK?

They need to bring that back. For real.

Posted by: Dad with Kids from A-Z | July 27, 2007 11:38 AM

11:21 AM I have a very different schedule than you do. I do not work in DC, but continue to work on DC time from home, which makes it easier for me to get things done in the afternoon because my work day is over on DC time and I have time before daughter gets home from school to start dinner, etc. (Although I do have to get up earlier in the morning)

I have no commute and my husband works from 7:30 to 3:30 with a flexible boss. My daughter goes to pre-school, her dad takes her swimming in the afternoons after dinner, we sometimes go for walks, but I am having a problem pregnancy so I have not been going lately. She usually watches sponge bob after she gets home from school in the afternoon and an hour of Jimmie at night. I am lucky that my husband helps with all the household chores; he really is a neat freak. I'm not going to break my day down in hours for you because every day is different, but I can tell you that it doesn't take my daughter an hour to eat dinner. I'm glad your schedule works for you, best of luck.

Meesh, I agree with you.

Posted by: scarry | July 27, 2007 11:38 AM

If Scarry is a working parent, her working hours and any interaction with her hausband bring us into a negative time zone.

Posted by: | July 27, 2007 11:21 AM

'cause we all know that SAHMs don't "work". Not.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 11:39 AM

"If Scarry is a working parent, her working hours and any interaction with her hausband bring us into a negative time zone."

11:21, you're in "a negative time zone." 14 hours minus 2 hours equals 8 hours? Your arguement sucks. Couldn't you have just written "I think 2 hours of TV a day is too much for my family" instead of attacking scarry?

Posted by: Meesh | July 27, 2007 11:40 AM

"Well thanks so much for telling us, gutless coward. If you can't even assign a name to a departure e-mail, you must be an invertebrate."

I don't think declining to use a fake name on the Net renders someone a "gutless coward".

Posted by: anon for this | July 27, 2007 11:42 AM


This is stupid. Has nothing to do with balance. Skipping today.

Posted by: | July 27, 2007 11:25 AM

Well thanks so much for telling us, gutless coward. If you can't even assign a name to a departure e-mail, you must be an invertebrate.


Hey hey hey - that's my name! Let's not go slamming people unnecessarily here.

(Speaking of hey hey hey - Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids; created by William H. Cosby, Jr., EdD. Used to love that show.)

Posted by: Gutless coward | July 27, 2007 11:42 AM

"Couldn't you have just written "I think 2 hours of TV a day is too much for my family" instead of attacking scarry?"

Nooo. Scarry is an easy target. It's too hard to resist!

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 11:44 AM

Am I the only one who's going to bring up SCHOOLHOUSE ROCK?

They need to bring that back. For real.

Posted by: Dad with Kids from A-Z | July 27, 2007 11:38 AM

I like it too! Not sure if kids now would watch it, though. Bought a DVD and burned a soundtrack to play in a car. LIberty KIDs were supposed to be similar in spirit, but too slow, and so is Cyberchase. My kid was able to solve all thei problems at age 5, now tht's he is 7 the only science/engineering show left for him is Myth Busters.

Posted by: hedge fund | July 27, 2007 11:46 AM

Without getting into the details of the odd scarry-basher's post, our kids watch very little TV in the summer and more in the winter. duh. Because of the additional daylight hours, and summer weather, we're likely to still be at the pool, or fishing, or generally outside until at least 8:30, then we eat dinner and the kids are in bed at 9:30 or 10:00ish. During the school year, and particularly in the dark days of January or February, the kids are inside more and, hence, we permit more TV. I am not sure that it makes any sense to have a single max. viewing standard that doesn't change with the seasons and accommodate the reality of family's lifestyle changes throughout the year -- unless, of course, you home school and live in a single season climate like Alaska, Hawaii or Florida.

Posted by: MN | July 27, 2007 11:47 AM

"I hope Scarry was joking when she said she was TRYING to limit cartoons to 2 hours a day. "

Oh, it's a lot more than 2 hours a day

A stalker like you would know.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 11:48 AM

Rocky and Bullwinkle. Adult content masked in a childs cartoon. Brilliant!

Posted by: Phillyfilly | July 27, 2007 11:49 AM

Oh! I loved fraggle rock.
And all the others everyone mentioned (or most of them!)

There was also one with a penguin that I really liked, can't remember the name. I think he didn't speak?

We have tried to keep TV to a minimum, a special treat, sort of. But the kids don't watch TV day to day, which is good for us.

We got the DVD of school house rocks and it's so awesome - but there are tons on there I've never seen!

When I was in grad school, they played it on saturday mornings again (it wasn't on for several years, I believe). So I got into the habit of watching it on Saturday mornings again, so much fun. Those are great cartoons.

Posted by: atlmom | July 27, 2007 11:58 AM

Another vote for Rocky and Bullwinkle.

I think they were the original inventors of the concept, common in big screen animated movies today, of putting in humor for all different age levels.

Posted by: CJB | July 27, 2007 12:01 PM

CJB

"Another vote for Rocky and Bullwinkle.

I think they were the original inventors of the concept, common in big screen animated movies today, of putting in humor for all different age levels."

You have it backwards....

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 12:07 PM

"Well thanks so much for telling us, gutless coward. If you can't even assign a name to a departure e-mail, you must be an invertebrate."

I don't think declining to use a fake name on the Net renders someone a "gutless coward".


Posted by: anon for this | July 27, 2007 11:42 AM

Again - this was such a controversial thought that you needed to be "anon for this"? You feel the need to share your thoughts on a blog, but you're so insecure and scared of the potential disapproval of strangers that you can't select a "signature". Freud would have a ball with you.

Posted by: Anon for this tee hee | July 27, 2007 12:10 PM

God Bless you Bill Kristol!!! Everyone on this blog loves you, even if they say otherwise. Thank you for serving in the military. Oh wait. Bill Kristol. You did not serve?!?!?!? Tell me that is a lie. You are such a military hawk. You MUST have served in the military. Please tell me you did. OH GOD BLESS YOU BILL KRISTOL!!!!!!

Posted by: Baba Booey | July 27, 2007 12:19 PM

And to you Dick Cheney. I salute you, you are a true military hero. Where did you serve. You must have served several tours in Vietnam. Oh wait. You did not serve?!?!!? You sought a deferment?!?!!? That cannot be correct. You are such a military hawk. I just know you served in the U.S. military. The Democrats MUST be lying about your record. Oh wait. They're not lying. Oh, shame on you Dick Cheney!!!! Shame on you. Please go and love your lesbian daughter.

Posted by: Baba Booey | July 27, 2007 12:23 PM

"There was also one with a penguin that I really liked, can't remember the name. I think he didn't speak?"

Chilly Willy!!! All that little penguin wanted was to be warm and no one would let him. Loved Chilly. Also a big Pepe lePew although i suppose his behaviour would be considered harassment these days.

Posted by: Moxiemom | July 27, 2007 12:23 PM

Pepe LePew was a sexist pig. Just like Bill Clinton. GOD BLESS YOU BILL KRISTOL. You are not a sexist pig. You are a true military hero. Tell us of your exploits in Vietnam. Please tell us!!!

Posted by: Baba Booey | July 27, 2007 12:26 PM

Hi Scarry!

My favorite toons were Scooby doo, deputy Dog, and of course, I had a big crush on Lassie. That was until the next door neighbor's poodle told me that the original Lassie was actually a dude collie dog that had been cut.

Then there is Superman who wears bright red panties on the outside of his costume that match his hooker boots.

I always thought Batman and Robin were a little bit funny too.

Talk about cartoon role models. Sheesh!

Posted by: Lil Husky | July 27, 2007 12:29 PM

I guess it boils down to this:

Warner Brothers or Disney?

Overall, WB.

I remember "School House Rock". I even sing the "Dough Nuts" jingle occasionally, much to the amusement of my children.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 12:30 PM

Rocky & Bullwinkle (and Boris & Natasha, Sherman & Mr. Peabody); Felix the Cat; Tom Terrific (and Crabby Appleton); Huckleberry Hound; Underdog; Dudley Do-Right; TopCat; Popeye; geez...where to stop?

:>)

Posted by: pittypat | July 27, 2007 12:32 PM

Given the popularity of Fat Albert, I'm surprised that there hasn't been some sort of cartoon for the African American community to arise lately? Something to combat so much of the crap BET broadcasts.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 12:32 PM

pittypat I forgot about Popeye, which is my old man's nickname. Remember the movie?

What's going on lil' huskey?

Posted by: scarry | July 27, 2007 12:37 PM

Wow, some of us are dating ourselves with our childhood cartoon preferences...

All time favorite: the Peanuts specials, many of which I now have on DVD. My Christmas decorations are Peanuts motif, and I have the Vince Guiraldi Trio's "Charlie Brown Christmas" CD. Also loved Rocky and Bullwinkle, Pink Panther, Scooby Doo, School House Rock. Currently, I enjoy watching SpongeBob, Avatar and the Simpsons with my daughter, though I don't get to do so very often (no self-imposed TV limits, just busy with other stuff).

Posted by: single western mom | July 27, 2007 12:37 PM

I agree with MN - TV watching varies. I remember it was the compensation for being sick, you could watch as much TV as you wanted. Before cable the daytime pickings were pretty bad, but now it is better, if you can stand the 100th viewing of ...

Posted by: Divorced mom of 1 | July 27, 2007 12:38 PM

"I remember it was the compensation for being sick, you could watch as much TV as you wanted. Before cable the daytime pickings were pretty bad, but now it is better"

Yeah, I think it rocks to be a sick kid these days! I used to get stuck with As the World Turns - blech.

Posted by: Moxiemom | July 27, 2007 12:40 PM

"Thank you for serving in the military. Oh wait. Bill Kristol. You did not serve?!?!?!?"

Posted by: Baba Booey '02 MPP | July 27, 2007 12:19 PM

Bom dia, Baba Booey! What does this have to do with balance or cartoons?
"And to you Dick Cheney. I salute you, you are a true military hero. Where did you serve."

Posted by: Baba Booey '02 MPP | July 27, 2007 12:23 PM

I've got my DD 214 right here. Where is your DD 214, Baba Booey? What was your service? Marines? Air Force? Navy? Army?

Posted by: Matt in Aberdeen | July 27, 2007 12:42 PM

Yeah, I think it rocks to be a sick kid these days! I used to get stuck with As the World Turns - blech.

Me too, my mom watched the soaps as she cleaned. I try to limit it to two hours because there was a study done that said more than that wasn't good for younger kids

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 12:45 PM

Favorite childhood cartoons were Mighty Mouse, Johnny Quest, Jetsons and Flintstones. If memory serves me correctly, the Flintstones was the first cartoon made for primetime and targeted to adults.

As a mom watching cartoons with my children who are now teenagers, my favorite is Rugrats. Worst of all time is Barney. My daughters love Spongebob even now, and loved the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles as young children.

Posted by: xyz | July 27, 2007 1:00 PM

Mighty Mouse!!

Thanks, xyz, for reminding me! Loved it.

Posted by: MN | July 27, 2007 1:01 PM

Junction Junction what's your function?


I'm just a Bill, up on capitol hill....

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 1:05 PM

Avatar

Sounds like a designer drug. I think I took some Avatar last night.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 1:11 PM

I think it would be neat to have a gay character interacting normally with all the other characters on a cartoon.

This is the same person who wants HEATHER HAS TWO MOMMYS as required reading. Not going to happen.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 1:15 PM

No love for Ren and Stimpy? The first two years of that show brought more laughs than I can ever remember. Hilarious!

Posted by: Tim O | July 27, 2007 1:16 PM

Uh, that would be CONjunction, junction. But that is neither here, NOR there unless you are linking phrases AND clauses.

BTW, Ollie has your adverbs.

:-)

Posted by: Balt Dad | July 27, 2007 1:20 PM

"I think it would be neat to have a gay character interacting normally with all the other characters on a cartoon."

BooBoo on Yogi Bear?

Most of the Gang on Top Cat?

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 1:22 PM

U.S. military bases around the world generally have a TV station (think local cable station) that broadcasts to base-housing. These channels show American television/movies, including cartoons, so please spare us military brats your pity, facetious or otherwise.

Posted by: spare me | July 27, 2007 1:29 PM

These channels show American television/movies, including cartoons, so please spare us military brats your pity, facetious or otherwise. "

The whole point of this blog is to bolster our sagging egos by pitying the less fortunate and imparting our incredible wisdom...

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 1:39 PM

"I think it would be neat to have a gay character interacting normally with all the other characters on a cartoon."

We've always had gay characters interacting normally with all the other characters: think of Peppermint Patty and Velma on Scooby Doo.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 1:40 PM

that would be conjunction junction, what's your function.

johnny quest
just about any looney tunes.
flintstones. the jetsons weren't as fun, imho. it was more intersting to see how they made "modern" things like a record player than it was to see futuristic stuff.
rocky & bullwinkle
scooby doo
pink panther
i was never into those japanese animie cartoons so kimba & speed racer were out for me.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 1:41 PM

Does anyone remember Atom Ant? And I had totally forgotten about Porky Pig.

Posted by: Emily | July 27, 2007 1:41 PM

And Caspar the Friendly Ghost.

Also, did you folks read comic books? I loved Archie comic books when I was a kid.

Posted by: Emily | July 27, 2007 1:45 PM

Weren't Rocky & Bullwinkle a couple?

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 1:49 PM

pittypat

"Rocky & Bullwinkle (and Boris & Natasha, Sherman & Mr. Peabody); Felix the Cat; Tom Terrific (and Crabby Appleton); Huckleberry Hound; Underdog; Dudley Do-Right; TopCat; Popeye; geez...where to stop?"

Is this a list of gay/bi cartoon characters?

Oh my darlin'
Oh my darlin'


:>)

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 1:52 PM

Dudley Do-Right is another gay character, for sure.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 2:07 PM

What about Marine Boy? Oh, yeah, he loved animals!

Woof!

Posted by: Lil Husky | July 27, 2007 2:11 PM

This is a pathetic topic......basically you feel sorry for a child that lived in another culture, that might speak another language, and has had different types of experiences than the "normal" American kid because they didn't sit on the couch and watch mindless hours of television. Shame on you.

Posted by: Me | July 27, 2007 2:13 PM

Me,
Don't you think you are taking this a little too seriously? Do you always become so easily aggrieved over minor things? I would hate to be in your skin. People on the blog only have to put up with your negative attitude for a few minutes a day. You have to live with yourself. That must be really hard.

Posted by: Emily | July 27, 2007 2:20 PM

"Me" will fit in very nicely with the warm folks on the AARP board.

I'm thinking "aguestoday", "softtail", "4377no" in particular. Delightful sorts, and just as open-minded as "me"!

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 2:38 PM

Cahrlie Brown Christmas. That came out the day I was born!! (Now who's dating hereself?)

I love that we are discussing cartoons--it's a cultural reference that people of a certain age in a certain country can relate to--and what's wrong with that?

Posted by: Caroline | July 27, 2007 2:50 PM

why is it that half the shows mentioned here aren't even cartoons, but merely kids shows?

Secondly, there was a time in my son's life where he watched 2 hours of nature shows a day, including Zoboomafoo, and because we cannot care for a dog in our house (not home enough), I think it was a wonderful thing for him. Anyone who disagrees can stuff it.

We've got cousins who don't watch that much TV and the youngest one can't name animals as obvious as an orangutan or okapi and he called an aardvark and anteater.

Since it's not a matter of watching ONLY TV at the expense of other thins, my son has plenty of friends, toys, games, art projects, listening to stories and playing in the back yard time.

But I know for a fact that his early love of nature documentaries means at age 4 he is able to watch entire episodes of Nova and other, smarter, documentary tv. There is absolutely nothing wrong with watching multiple hours of educational tv as long as the kids draw, help with laundry, set the table and the rest.

I know because I watched massive amounts of TV as a kid and it inspired me to seek out things I saw, like NYC or the ocean or writing.

Posted by: DCer | July 27, 2007 3:13 PM

DCer

"Secondly, there was a time in my son's life where he watched 2 hours of nature shows a day, including Zoboomafoo, and because we cannot care for a dog in our house (not home enough), I think it was a wonderful thing for him. Anyone who disagrees can stuff it."

Wise words, indeed.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 3:26 PM

I think it was a wonderful thing for him. Anyone who disagrees can stuff it.

No need to be rude. No one cares how much tv your kid watches.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 3:26 PM

Anyone who disagrees can stuff it.

Somebody is touchy today

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 3:34 PM

"I think it was a wonderful thing for him. Anyone who disagrees can stuff it. "

No need to be rude. No one cares how much tv your kid watches.


Right. I REALLY don't care what your kid does!

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 3:34 PM

For someone who doesn't care, you sure spend a lot of time posting about it.

Posted by: Emily | July 27, 2007 3:38 PM

Anyone who disagrees can stuff it.

Somebody is touchy today


Well, that's what happens when you sprog up and never get laid anymore.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 3:42 PM

For someone who doesn't care, you sure spend a lot of time posting about it

One post equals a lot?

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 3:43 PM

3:34, thou doth protest too much.

Posted by: Meesh | July 27, 2007 3:43 PM

Well, that's what happens when you sprog up and never get laid anymore.

Posted by: | July 27, 2007 03:42 PM

Well, we could be like you and give it away every night.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 3:46 PM

why is it that half the shows mentioned here aren't even cartoons, but merely kids shows?

Who cares? Why does this bother you so? Isn't this a harmless diversion from the proposed topic of discussion?

For someone who states, "Anyone who disagrees can stuff it", you certainly are being rude to everyone who has contributed thoughts on the subject.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 3:47 PM

i don't get it

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 4:17 PM

what a sorry direction the blog took today.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 27, 2007 4:49 PM

Oh man what a pandora's box but here we go:

Woody Woodpecker (Old Crazy Woody was the best)

Warner Bros. Cartoons (Daffy when he was nutty)

Pole Position

M.A.S.K.

G. I. Joe

Transformers

TranZor Z

Jayce and the Wheeled Warriors

Shirttails

Spiderman and his Amazing Friends

The Real Ghostbusters

ALF

Pac-Man

Beetlejuice

Tom and Jerry

Centurions

Incredible Hulk

Galtar and the Golden Lance

He-Man and the Masters of the Universe

Robotech

Gargoyles

Gummi Bears

Alvin and the Chipmunks

Captain N The Gamemaster

Mr. T

Rambo

Thundarr the Barbarian

Voltron


God the list goes on. Not all of these ran Saturday mornings but enough did.

Posted by: Tarik | July 30, 2007 11:46 AM

Whoa - way too many good one's to name. Here are most of my favorites growing up (actually I would probably still watch the discontinued if they were on TV now!) in no particular order:

Top Cat
Pink Panther
Dennis the Menace
TMNT
He-Man
Garfield
Heathcliff & Friends
Smurfs
GI Joe
Transformers
Quicksilver
Batman (90s version)
Simpsons
Woody Woodpecker
Warner Bros.
M.A.S.K
Voltron
Chip N' Dales Rescue Rangers
Ducktails
Any Donald Duck (man he's so angry!)
Johnny Quest
Pandamonium
Fraggle Rock

Posted by: house music all night long | July 30, 2007 12:41 PM

I didn't see any mention of the Muppets anywhere. They were my favorite from local boy Jim Henson. He created Kermit from his mother's winter coat.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 30, 2007 1:45 PM

I didn't see any mention of the Muppets anywhere. They were my favorite from local boy Jim Henson. He created Kermit from his mother's winter coat.

Posted by: | July 30, 2007 01:45 PM

maybe because the Muppets weren't a CARTOON. Sheesh.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 30, 2007 4:36 PM

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