The 68-Year Old Entrepreneur, Part II

Welcome to the "On Balance" guest blog. Every Tuesday, "On Balance" features the views of a guest writer. It could be your neighbor, your boss, your most loved or hated poster from the blog, or you! Send me your original, unpublished entry (300 words or fewer) for consideration. Obviously, the topic should be something related to balancing your life.

By Joan Weintrob

Please see the yesterday's Guest Blog for Part I of Joan Weintrob's story.

In the 1970s many orthotic and prosthetic facilities were pretty rough around the edges. Nice people ran them, but with minimal attention to professional standards, aesthetics, patient comfort, and working conditions. In my jobs running Inova Fairfax Hospital's Occupational Therapy and Orthotic-Prosthetic departments and as a Certified Prosthetist Orthotist I had visited enough of them to know I could do better. What I especially wanted was to show the orthotic-prosthetic profession how a truly professional private facility could be operated; perhaps I also wanted to show this 99 percent male profession that a woman could compete, succeed and set a higher standard.

So, late in 1979 my husband and I borrowed against our home (that was kind of nerve-wracking), rented space, purchased machinery and supplies, and had space built out to our specifications. On January 2, 1980, The Orthotic Prosthetic Center -- the first orthotic-prosthetic facility to be established by a woman -- opened for business. Of course the folks at the hospital were not too pleased, especially since I had also recruited several of my best staff. Their reaction was "never darken our door again," but those folks are all gone and we do darken their doors rather regularly. Time heals.

Looking back today, I would like to think that the facility I put in place has had some impact on this profession and people's lives. Certainly orthotics and prosthetics was moving in the direction of greater professionalization, but perhaps in a small way I helped to move the profession further and faster than it might otherwise have moved. I certainly had an impact with regard to making the profession more accepting of women practitioners.

There were a lot of working nights and weekends that I and my husband will never get back. There are also thousands of people whom we helped to be more mobile, several hundred women working in the field at a professional level, and I am very proud that my son, Elliot Weintrob, has chosen to "follow in his mother's footsteps." He is taking OPC to the next generation.


Joan Weintrob, 68, is the founder and president of the Orthotic Prosthetic Center, Inc, based in Fairfax and Rockville. Since its founding in 1980, OPC has changed the lives of thousands of adults and children by pioneering prosthetic body parts including upper and lower extremities, energy storying feet, hydraulic and computer controlled knees, and ultra-light titanium and graphite components, allowing people who have lost limbs to return to active, athletic lives. Weintrob works full-time and has no plan to retire anytime soon. She lives in Potomac, Md., with her husband; she has two sons and four grandchildren. Her company was recently featured on The Discovery Channel Rebuilt: The Human Body Shop.

By Leslie Morgan Steiner |  August 29, 2007; 7:00 AM ET  | Category:  Guest Blogs
Previous: The 68-Year-Old Entrepreneur, Part I | Next: The Wonders of Commercializing Fatherhood


Add On Balance to Your Site
Keep up with the latest installments of On Balance with an easy-to-use widget. It's simple to add to your Web site, and it will update every time there's a new entry to On Balance.
Get This Widget >>


Comments

Please email us to report offensive comments.



First!

Posted by: mehitabel | August 29, 2007 7:05 AM

Hey, it is cool her son followed her footsteps!

Posted by: dotted_1 | August 29, 2007 7:12 AM

Sorry to be off topic for just a minute.

Frieda did read all of your comments (finally). It was not the easiest thing for her to sit in front of the computer. "I hate computers!" is one of her sayings.

She thanks all of you for your comments esp. the thoughtful ones.

And maybe today, we will have our house finally totally functional--just one more sink to hook up! It has been a long 2 years.

Posted by: Fred | August 29, 2007 7:49 AM

I know Leslie's on vacation....but I have to agree with the observation that some folks had yesterday that this post was more of a self-congratulatory autobiography than anything else.

I didn't learn anything from this post, and I don't think it really spurred any points for discussion either.

Sorry to be so negative. It's early.

Posted by: ProudPapa15 | August 29, 2007 8:06 AM

I think it's great that your son followed in your footsteps, Joan, but I'm not sure that this guest blog is anything more than a brief summary of the life of an accomplished and ambitious woman. Well done, though.

Fred, I don't know how you do it! But congratulations to both of you for sticking it out, and I hope you get that last sink installed today. You both rank as pioneers in my book.

Posted by: WorkingMomX | August 29, 2007 8:06 AM

Where's the "balance" in this article? It's just as others have said, it's just a kind of sketchy autobiography that any businessman (or woman) could have written about their own exploits.

Posted by: johnl | August 29, 2007 8:27 AM

I also finally got around to reading the Friday and Monday blogs that I missed. Fred and Frieda, you have a great story. Good luck in the future. pATRICK, I'm sorry that you and your dad have to go through this.

I'll echo what I wrote yesterday about Part 1. I would have loved to hear about her inspiration for her work and maybe some success stories about people she has helped. Her work has helped so many people achieve balance. Anybody can have kids and balance family with work. Few people can do so while touching the lives of so many other people in such an amazing way.

In the interest of getting what I want, does anyone have stories about friends or family receiving a life-changing prosthesis?

Posted by: Meesh | August 29, 2007 8:27 AM

An American enterprise, OPC, it is now going into a second generation. Enterprise, it brings to mind the Dollar Bill, this was until recently the most prized document in the Western system. Western men, they struggled to get more and more copies of this document. The seal, it is on the Dollar Bill, it has an eye inside a pyramid, Illuminati stuff, «Annuit coeptis» above the eye. This «Annuit coeptis», what does it mean, why is it on this most prized document? It means, «Allah has favored our enterprise», it is there because the Founding Fathers, they were believers, People of the Book. Their enterprise (USA! USA!), when it succeeded, they knew enough not to say, «My power and the might of my hand hath gotten me this wealth» Deuteronomy 8:17, they knew to acknowledge Providence «for it is He that giveth thee power to get wealth». Providence, they even named a city after Him, it is the capital of Rhode Island. That is why «Annuit coeptis» is on the Dollar Bill, the symbol of American successful enterprise, in Latin it is acknowledgment of Divine Providence. O Weintrob family, is «Annuit coeptis» on the seal of the Orthotic Prosthetic Center, Inc.?

Posted by: abu_ibrahim | August 29, 2007 8:42 AM

Ok here is a (hopefully) discussion-provoking question:

It sounds to me as if Ms. Weintrob is a highly qualified professional in a field that helps a lot of people in critical, life-changing ways. In fact, my impression is that if she had decided to leave her career and be a SAHM, the world would be (slightly) worse off than it is today.

How much should the "worth" of one's work factor into the decision about working full-time, part-time, staying home, etc? If you're in a profession that has a big impact on people's lives, should you think about that when you're making a "balance" decision?

Posted by: barfster | August 29, 2007 8:49 AM

Okay, I'm echoing others here, but since I went off on my diatribe yesterday about Part I, I felt that I should say something. I still don't see what Ms. Weintrob did to achieve her balance. She gave a good outline of her professional life, but really did not bring up anything regarding her family. I am interested in the fact that her son has chosen to follow her professionally. It makes me wonder, did he visit Mom at the Center as a child and become inspired by her work? How was she able to show him the value of her work (and yes, what she does is incredibly valuable...my Dad is a past Board Chair of a Shriners hospital, I have deep admiration for orthotics professionals). I still don't see the balance in the post.

Posted by: OrganicGal | August 29, 2007 8:50 AM

This could have been interesting. But my mom was a single working mother who divorced her abusive husband in the 60s, so it's hard to compare. And her great-grandmother raised 6 kids on her own as a recent immigrant during the depression after her husband died of the 1919 flu. And her mother and grandmother were both divorced, long before it was remotely acceptable. Just sayin'. Life's tough all around. You make it work.

Posted by: atb2 | August 29, 2007 8:51 AM

barfster- Be careful. We'll end up again discussing if it's acceptable for ivy leaguers or MDs to be SAHMs. To answer your question, I think it's easier to stay in your job if you find it important and rewarding. That, of course, only really matters if you have the CHOICE not to work, which many working moms do not have. I think I'll always work, at least PT, because what I do is hugely important, I want to put my very hard-earned degree to work, and I love the stimulation.

Posted by: atb2 | August 29, 2007 8:56 AM

Wow, barfster, how does one value different professions? This is really a slippery slope. Teachers are perhaps one of our most important commodities, they can affect our children in so many ways, but they clearly aren't valued in society the way, say, doctors are. Farmers provide perhaps the most valuable service of all...without them, we don't eat! But how does that profession fit into your view of "worth"? Because many urban professionsal really have elitist attitudes when it comes to farmers; just see what happens in formerly rural communities when developers start gobbling up land. A farm that had been in the same family for over a century near where I live was pretty much told they couldn't raise layers any more because the roosters disturbed others in the "neighborhood."
I understand what you're asking, but until we can agree on what "worth" different professions have, this would be tough to discuss dispassionately.

Posted by: OrganicGal | August 29, 2007 8:56 AM

Gee, how nice to read Saint Joan (self-sanctified) Part II. Really, is this her way of getting her name 'mentioned' to spur some interest from the WSJ? Did she even write it, or was it composed by her marketing department? It sounds like one of those warm fuzzy founder profiles you find on page 3 of a marketing brochure.

OT:
Al-gebra! LOL! Although, the way the TSA behaves, I thought it was a serious story until I read the end of the second paragraph! Our math chair was ROTFL!

Posted by: educmom_615 | August 29, 2007 9:06 AM

"It sounds like one of those warm fuzzy founder profiles you find on page 3 of a marketing brochure."

Now, now, let's not release the claws quite yet. It only makes you sound envious of her accomplishments.

While I do agree on the point that she doesn't mention much about her family, I would also like to point out that most of Leslie's posts (and Brian's) don't really involve the idea of balance, either. Most times it is just material that's there without any real substance. So I really don't see how this is any different than any other post, really.

Posted by: jrs1978smith | August 29, 2007 9:16 AM

Again little to no "balance" here. It really is striking how the kids are rarely mentioned and the impact on them. Sounded like a summary of work accomplishments to me.

I found it interesting that Leslie feels she accomplished what she did with little support. Really? Supportive husband, nanny/housekeeper, no doubt she had money to pay for any help she needed/convenience items, etc. How much more does a person need?

Posted by: laineypsu | August 29, 2007 9:27 AM

Um, no, I'm not envious of her at all. She sounds self-absorbed and materialistic. In two days of postings, she devoted about three sentences to her family (primarily consisting of her "crying with exhaustion" when she came home to a home kept by a full-time housekeeper and a child watched by a full-time nanny, and followed up with her 'son as keeper of the legacy of the company' statement).

I have done a lot more with a lot less support, like almost everyone else in the world, and the people I know who had her level of support generally are more appreciative of their support system and understanding of the role that system played in their lives. I will never get my name in the paper, but then my life's goal isn't to be on the cover of Business Week (I'm a teacher after all).

Perhaps if she had talked AT ALL about why she was drawn to the field (unless it was the money to be made), or how she feels about being able to help thousands live better lives, or what inspired her son to follow her into the business (if it was anything other than money), the profile would have been worth reading. As it stands, these pieces are simply PR fluff, and not worth the bandwidth used to transmit them.

Posted by: educmom_615 | August 29, 2007 9:30 AM

«Al-gebra! LOL! Although, the way the TSA behaves, I thought it was a serious story until I read the end of the second paragraph! Our math chair was ROTFL!»
«Posted by: educmom_615 | August 29, 2007 09:06 AM »

«Al-gebra», sounds Arabic, sounds like al-Qaeda, so it must be suspected to be terrorist? LOL? ROTFL? The laugh, it is on crusaders, because «al-gebra», it really «is» Arabic! Muhammad bin Musa al-Khwarizmi, he wrote an algebra book 1200 years ago, it was called «al-Jabr wa-l-Muqābala», this means «restoring and compensating» or «completion and balancing». Staying-In-the-Residence Mothers and Working-Outside-the-Residence Mothers, they do balancing, this is «On Balance», so these mothers are doing al-Jabr, Algebra, every day, more power to them!. Al-Khwarizmi, he was a Persian, his name sounds like «algorithm» but it is the other way around, «algorithm» was named after al-Khwarizmi, not after Al Gore. Muslims, they were doing science, they were doing mathematics, Western system was in Dark Ages, hundreds of years before crusaders launched the First Crusade in 1099.

Posted by: abu_ibrahim | August 29, 2007 9:34 AM

abu - I know I was laughing because I already know algebra was first arabic. It is part and parcel of middle school math. Something i would also expect a math professor to also know. That is what makes the whole thing funny in the first place. get a life.

Posted by: dotted_1 | August 29, 2007 9:39 AM

dotted,
don't respond...it feeds on responses...

Posted by: educmom_615 | August 29, 2007 9:43 AM

educmom_615 - you are right. I don't know what came over me. I usually observe the rule: think before and after typing..and always before hitting submit "is it worth it?" In this case, I shouldn't have hit submit so quickly. No excuses!

Posted by: dotted_1 | August 29, 2007 9:46 AM

It's like pATRICK when bababooey is online. Poor guy gets sucked in every time.

My grandfather had a great saying: you're only an idiot when you argue with one. And then there's this one from Oscar Wilde (I think): never match wits with an unarmed man.

Posted by: educmom_615 | August 29, 2007 9:50 AM

educmom_615 - LOL double time! have a great day...off to a meeting right now

Posted by: dotted_1 | August 29, 2007 9:55 AM

Here's a nice social science article important for balance. I did not read the paper. This is but a press release.

Married Men Really Do Do Less Housework Than Live-in Boyfriends

Science Daily -- The age-old stereotype that women do more housework than men has gotten more credibility with a George Mason University study co-written by sociologist Shannon Davis.

The study of more than 17,000 people in 28 countries found that married men report doing less housework than men who are live-in boyfriends.

According to Davis, the key finding of the study is that it suggests the institution of marriage changes the division of labor. Couples with an egalitarian view on gender--seeing men and women as equal--are more likely to divide the household chores equally. However, in married relationships, even if an egalitarian viewpoint is present, men still report doing less housework than their wives.

"Marriage as an institution seems to have a traditionalizing effect on couples--even couples who see men and women as equal," says Davis.

While the researchers did not follow cohabitating couples over time to see if their division of housework changed after marriage, their study provides a "snapshot" in time of couples all over the world.

"Our research suggests that couples across many countries are influenced by similar factors when deciding how to divide the housework," she says. "It's the way the society has defined what being married means, the institution itself, that affects behavior."

This study was recently published in the Journal of Family Issues by Davis and co-authors Theodore Greenstein and Jennifer Gerteisen Marks of North Carolina State University.

Posted by: atb2 | August 29, 2007 10:04 AM

It's like pATRICK when bababooey is online. Poor guy gets sucked in every time.

Not sure if you mean me sucked in by him/her or the other way around. I actually tend to ignore BB, except when I get bored. People who call you and your alzheimer's father demented sickos tend to be unhinged obviously.

Posted by: pATRICK | August 29, 2007 10:07 AM

Before long there will be more to ignore than respond to (abu, bb, hilary, garybusis, etal).

Posted by: KLB_SS_MD | August 29, 2007 10:14 AM

Before long there will be more to ignore than respond to (abu, bb, hilary, garybusis, etal).

Posted by: KLB_SS_MD | August 29, 2007 10:14 AM

Yep, i wish LESLIE would enable a feature that allows you to block certain posters like the NY TIMES has. It stops trolls cold.

Posted by: pATRICK | August 29, 2007 10:16 AM

Butt measurement..... A man and his wife were working in their garden 1 day. The man looks over at his wife and says: Your butt is getting really big, I mean really big. I bet your butt is bigger than the
barbecue. With that, he proceeded to get a measuring tape and measured the grill and then went over to where his wife was working and measured his wife's bottom. Yes, I was right, your butt is 2" wider than the barbecue!!!
The woman chose to ignore her husband.
Later that night in bed, the husband is feeling a little frisky. He makes some advances towards his wife who completely brushes him off.
What's wrong? he asks.
She answers: Do you really think I'm going to fire up this big-ass grill for one little weenie?

Posted by: KLB_SS_MD | August 29, 2007 10:18 AM

pATRICK, While most of us who contribute to this blog have a (wide!) variety of opinions on issues -- when it comes down to basic values like caring for an ill loved one, we're supportive of each another. I think you know who your many friends are here. It's best just to ignore the few others.

Posted by: mehitabel | August 29, 2007 10:19 AM

I meant you getting sucked in. He/she/it is obviously off the rails (what is it about the web that brings out the crazies?) and he/she/it seems to thrive on nastiness.

How is your dad? I hope he's having some good days.

Posted by: educmom_615 | August 29, 2007 10:19 AM

Posted by: mehitabel | August 29, 2007 10:19 AM


Thanks, pussycat

Posted by: pATRICK | August 29, 2007 10:21 AM

I meant you getting sucked in. He/she/it is obviously off the rails (what is it about the web that brings out the crazies?) and he/she/it seems to thrive on nastiness.

How is your dad? I hope he's having some good days.

Posted by: educmom_615 | August 29, 2007 10:19 AM

Well, I probably should not pull his/her tail, but as MN said, low hanging fruit. My dad has mostly good days now but it's really just a matter of time.

Posted by: pATRICK | August 29, 2007 10:23 AM

I second mehitabel - we may not always agree on the little stuff but when it comes to issues such as aging parents or sick family members I have found this group to be very supportive.

Posted by: KLB_SS_MD | August 29, 2007 10:26 AM

ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ

Posted by: hillary1 | August 29, 2007 10:28 AM

pATRICK:

"Not sure if you mean me sucked in by him/her or the other way around. I actually tend to ignore BB, except when I get bored. People who call you and your alzheimer's father demented sickos tend to be unhinged obviously."

You must be bored a lot, dude. You need to get out more. There's a whole world surrounding you. Enjoy it. Anyway, I was going to let this go because I love ridiculing you, sparring with you, etc. You're an easy target, let's be honest. But when you start lying and making claims that I have said things that I have never said, that's when I start to get a little angry. You seem to believe that all the posters on this blog who disagree with you are all my "alter egos". Please get over yourself pATRICK. More than one person on here does not like you. Accept it. More than one person on here does not like me. You don't see me trying to act as if all of you are the same person. Love you pATRICK!! All the best to you and yours!!!

Posted by: bababooey666 | August 29, 2007 10:29 AM

"ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ"

Hillary:

I agree. Great minds think alike! We're like two peas in a pod!!

Posted by: bababooey666 | August 29, 2007 10:33 AM

pATRICK I like you and even the people who don't agree with you like you most of the time.

Where is lil' Husky lately?

WHere is Emily? I hope she is okay. I have gained 20 pounds, ten in the last two weeks.

Posted by: Irishgirl | August 29, 2007 10:34 AM

Where is that lil husky?

Posted by: pATRICK | August 29, 2007 10:34 AM

He is a self-made man who owes his success to no one.

Posted by: KLB_SS_MD | August 29, 2007 10:48 AM

Jen S, too. I'm interested to hear how all the pregnancies are going.

Scarry, are you on bedrest? How's your little dude? Everything look OK?

Posted by: atb2 | August 29, 2007 10:49 AM

KLB, do you suppose he graduated Summa cum laude?

Posted by: mehitabel | August 29, 2007 10:51 AM

educmom_615:

"And then there's this one from Oscar Wilde (I think): never match wits with an unarmed man."

And don't forget this one from Dr. Richard Kimble: Never match wits with a one-armed man!

Posted by: bababooey666 | August 29, 2007 10:57 AM

Lil Husky is still here, but just for a few more days.

I haven't been saying too much, I'm a little depressed that my master, Father of 4, has perished and I have one final appointment at the vet on Friday.

I've also been working like a dog lately on other details, which is OK since there are only a few trolls to bark at on this blog anymore.

But thanks for asking about me. I think this blog has a lot to do with making friends, and not so much to do with balance. I'll be very sad with large puppy dog eyes when I leave.

Woof!

Posted by: Lil_Husky | August 29, 2007 10:57 AM

Hey guys. Just got back from vacation, when I did not look at a computer for even a day. Was mostly out of touch with the world, which was nice. But now reality sets in.

Pregnancy is still going well, and I am feeling pretty good these days. Haven't gained too much weight yet (6 pounds so far), but I am only at 25 weeks, so there is still time, and my doctor does not seem concerned about it. School started for my son, and work seems to have exploded in my absence, so I may not be posting too much until I get caught up.

Patrick, sorry to hear about your father. Hang in there. Scarry, how are YOU doing lately. Sounds like you got to 30 weeks now, right? Hope all is well. All other pregnant ladies, best wishes!!!

Posted by: Emily | August 29, 2007 11:06 AM

Agree with posters that blog entries were more like professional summaries rather than anything meaty to provide insight. Would like to know more about how she succeeded at work in a male-driven world. Did her husband support her work drive? In what ways? And did bosses/coworkers try to hold her back because she was a woman? How did she resist that and gain people's respect anyways? Welcome thoughts of the man other successful women who read this blog on how *they* have navigated the workplace, overcome male/female stereotypes.

Anyone see the article a month ago about social cost of haggling? http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/07/29/AR2007072900827.html Seems to argue that women don't ask for raises because asking actually hurts their chances at getting one, or being liked in the workplace (which when you are at the bottom of the totem pole, being liked does count for something). Thoughts? Responses? What's a poor girl to do in today's workplace!

Posted by: _Miles | August 29, 2007 11:09 AM

Lil Husky,
Why are you leaving? Don't leave!!

Posted by: Emily | August 29, 2007 11:10 AM

LIL HUSKY, i hope you don't leave I always enjoyed your posts.

Posted by: pATRICK | August 29, 2007 11:11 AM

Scarry, are you on bedrest? How's your little dude? Everything look OK?

Nope, I am not on bed rest. I am doing better and happy about the weight gain. It's all baby. Emily I am at 31 weeks now.

Don't sweat the no weight gain, I only gained ten with my daughter and she is healthy.

Posted by: Irishgirl | August 29, 2007 11:13 AM

Today reminds me of a SNL skit. Where the guy is a radio disc jockey who gets no calls. He starts throwing out the most outlandish topics he can think of to get people to call. Quite funny.

Posted by: pATRICK | August 29, 2007 11:52 AM

pATRICK:

"Today reminds me of a SNL skit. Where the guy is a radio disc jockey who gets no calls. He starts throwing out the most outlandish topics he can think of to get people to call. Quite funny."

Umm. Wow. You tried to reference pop culture. You failed to be funny of course. But this is a dramatic step forward. I admire you for it. It's like a 3-year-old who is being potty-trained. You tried, but you still dropped your load on the bathroom floor rather than in the toilet. Keep trying pATRICK. Eventually you will hear that satisfying PLOP as it actually lands in the bowl!!!

Posted by: bababooey666 | August 29, 2007 11:59 AM

pATRICK, you are the big dog of the Onbalance blog now. It's up to you to protect all the wonderful women that visit this blog from Leslie's run-away feminism.

Personally, I would leave Emily and MN alone though. They are perfectly capable of taking care of themselves, and if your thoughts encroach on their opinion, they have some mighty sharp teeth to bite you with. :-)

Posted by: Lil_Husky | August 29, 2007 12:00 PM

LIL HUSKY, come visit sometime, we can eat some of emily's flan. I might be close to getting out of her dog house soon.

Posted by: pATRICK | August 29, 2007 12:03 PM

Oh yeah, Hello Bablebooey666. Didn't see you there. How are we doing today?

Posted by: Lil_Husky | August 29, 2007 12:04 PM

Shhh, Lil Husky, let sleeping dogs lie.

Posted by: mehitabel | August 29, 2007 12:10 PM

some of you folks are really mean...i can't believe how hard you are on joan. how many of you having started successful businesses that help thousands of others -- while raising kids? much less thirty years ago when daycare and working mothers were far rarer concepts? i didn't read anything sanctimonious in her essay. i thought she was pretty modest. i sense an undertone of misogeny here. what gives?

and for the record, i approached her to write this after seeing the discovery show. she's not seeking any publicity.

no wonder more women of her generation didn't start their own businesses, if this is any indication of the reception women entrepreneurs got.

Posted by: leslie4 | August 29, 2007 12:24 PM

Leslie, Why didn't YOU ask Joan to rewrite her essay to include more information and anecdotes about how her career has helped people? That's part of your job.

Posted by: mehitabel | August 29, 2007 12:26 PM

«I have carefully cultivated my personality on this blog and I love the fact that simpletons such as you and pATRICK have bought into it.»
«Posted by: bababooey666 '02 MPP | August 28, 2007 01:27 PM »

«You tried, but you still dropped your load on the bathroom floor rather than in the toilet. Keep trying pATRICK. Eventually you will hear that satisfying PLOP as it actually lands in the bowl!!!»
«Posted by: bababooey666 | August 29, 2007 11:59 AM »

O Lady, cannot we all get along? Toilet humor, what has that to do with Orthotic Prosthetic Center, with Mrs. Weintrob and her son Elliott, are you not off topic? Bathroom floor reference and calling fellow posters «simpletons», is this your «carefully cultivated personality»?

Posted by: abu_ibrahim | August 29, 2007 12:35 PM

"Shhh, Lil Husky, let sleeping dogs lie."

Oh I'm sorry, mehitabel. I forgot. Only persons that are pre-approved by you are allowed to post on this blog. Get over yourself. Develop some debating skills. Learn how to take on those with opposing viewpoints. It's a little more interesting than just pretending everyone agrees with you.

Posted by: bababooey666 | August 29, 2007 12:38 PM

father of 4--Don't leave me!!!!!!

Posted by: Irishgirl | August 29, 2007 12:40 PM

"O Lady, cannot we all get along? Toilet humor, what has that to do with Orthotic Prosthetic Center, with Mrs. Weintrob and her son Elliott, are you not off topic? Bathroom floor reference and calling fellow posters «simpletons», is this your «carefully cultivated personality»? "

Oh abu. You are my id and I am your ego. Or something like that.

Posted by: bababooey666 | August 29, 2007 12:41 PM

no wonder more women of her generation didn't start their own businesses, if this is any indication of the reception women entrepreneurs got.

Posted by: leslie | August 29, 2007 12:24 PM

This is more than a bit defensive and indicates you are not even reading the comments. This is about Joan's presentation of her life story, which is no reflection on other women, other entrepreneurs, or other women entrepreneurs.

Posted by: gcoward | August 29, 2007 12:42 PM

"father of 4--Don't leave me!!!!!! "

My God girl. Stop packing on ten pounds a week, that might help. :)

Posted by: bababooey666 | August 29, 2007 12:42 PM

Leslie,

The problem with Joan's article isn't that she wrote it, but that it doesn't go into any detail at all on how she managed to run her family while she created this business.

It was all about the business; the only time she spoke about the kids it was as a throwaway comment so she could get back to talking about how successful she was in her business.

Posted by: johnl | August 29, 2007 12:43 PM

Leslie, you're accusing us of being mean, then calling us misogynists? Pot, meet kettle. And I'm not sure, but I think several of us that commented negatively are women. Myself, Irishgirl, WorkingMomX, educmom all had the same reaction. I don't think that we are all misogynists, but we do weigh your topics against our, our mother's, grandmother's, mil's etc. experiences.

Personally, I was bothered by the level of reference to social/financial expenditures that many of us can't afford (openings at the Corcoran! Tuxedoes! Nanny-housekeepers!) and still pointing out her level of exhaustion and tears. Um....I don't have any of those things, I believe that my business benefits others, and I tend not to cry with exhaustion, because it gets me exactly nowhere, except more tired.

Ms. Weintrob likely does have amazing tales to tell. I'd like to hear about her difficulties in setting up shop (were there problems with suppliers or landlords that were clearly gender-based?). Or how she was able to pass on her gifts and passion to her son (did she bring him to work and allow him to become involved at age-appropriate levels? Did her enthusiasm for her work while at home impact him?). Or how her work has allowed other women live more full lives, and care for their families in better ways due to her expertise.

It's not that she doesn't have an amazing story, and I'm certain she does...maybe she just needed editing to draw out some of these ideas.

Posted by: OrganicGal | August 29, 2007 12:44 PM

Emily,

For some strange reason, I am compelled to recommend that you read Monday's column.

Posted by: Fred | August 29, 2007 12:47 PM

I do find it slightly humorous that many of you are finally coming around to my point of view. Leslie's stewardship of this blog is sorely lacking. She needs to go. Plain and simple. (Leslie, no need to thank me. You will now receive many posts backing you up. Don't take them all seriously. There are many persons on here who are simply afraid to agree with me. But take this as a warning. You can be easily replaced. And you should be. Enjoy your vacation. If you truly cared about your job, you would cut your trip short and get back here to deal with this.)

Posted by: bababooey666 | August 29, 2007 12:48 PM

calling fellow posters «simpletons», is this your «carefully cultivated personality»? "

«Oh abu. You are my id and I am your ego. Or something like that.»
«Posted by: bababooey666 | August 29, 2007 12:41 PM»

O Lady, you cannot fool me, «id» means the «unconscious», you called pATRICK a «simpleton», now you call me unconscious, cannot we all get along here? This is as bad as when other posters call you bad names. Mrs. Weintrob's orthotics enterprise, that is the topic, injured little kids, they need manmade hands and feet, she provides them, her son Elliott follows her and helps kids, what do you think of that, bababooey666?

Posted by: abu_ibrahim | August 29, 2007 12:51 PM

"father of 4--Don't leave me!!!!!! "

"My God girl. Stop packing on ten pounds a week, that might help. :)"

The weight goes to her chest! That's how she got to be a cheerleader-pay attention!

Posted by: hillary1 | August 29, 2007 12:51 PM

I second OrganicGal's comments, though I'd add that Mrs. Weintrob's comparatively privileged upbringing and adult life do not inherently preclude her business from benefitting others. Leslie, you should have recognized the deficiencies in the guest blog and asked the author to address them.

Posted by: mehitabel | August 29, 2007 12:54 PM

""father of 4--Don't leave me!!!!!! "

"My God girl. Stop packing on ten pounds a week, that might help. :)"

The weight goes to her chest! That's how she got to be a cheerleader-pay attention!"

Mmmm. Thank God I'm a lesbian. Call me irishgirl. And I don't care WHAT you call me. Just call me.

Posted by: bababooey666 | August 29, 2007 12:59 PM

abu:

"what do you think of that, bababooey666?"

Uhhhh, whatyou talkin' bout Willis???

Posted by: bababooey666 | August 29, 2007 1:01 PM

Lil Husky's first vet visit

Back when I was a little pup, I found myself at the vet with a few other dogs, all of whom had remorseful eyes.

The beagle was the first to speak up. "I'm a barker, I bark at everything. The mailman, paperboy, dog next door, anything that moves. The last straw was when I got kicked out into my doghouse and woke the whole neighborhood up by barking at the moon. So that's why I'm here. I'm going to get my nads cut off. Master says it will help keep me from barking at everything."

We all put our tails down and gave the beagle a sympathetic howl.

The black lab was next. "I'm a chewer. I chew everything, chairs, couch, table legs, anything. The last straw was when I chewed my master's new shoes the day of the office party. So here I am, waiting to have my nads cut off too. Master says it will help me keep from chewing on everything."

Once again, all us dogs put our tails down and gave the black lab a sympathetic howl.

Then it was the shepeard's turn. "I'm a pisser. I piss everywhere. The final straw was when I pissed on my master's rug when I was frightened from a thunderstorm. So here I am, ready to get my nads cut off too."

all us dogs put our tails down and gave the shepeard a sympathetic howl.

Then I supposed it was my turn. "I'm a humper. I hump everything, Table legs, chair legs, my master's leg, her boyfriends legs. It was the final straw when my master got out of the shower. After she dried herself off, she dropped her towell, and when she bent over to pick it up, well, I just couldn't help myself. So here I am too"

When all the dogs began putting their tails between their legs, I had to interrupt them before the sympathetic howl, "hey guys, don't worry about me. I'm here to get my nails cut!"

Posted by: Lil_Husky | August 29, 2007 1:01 PM

Posted by: leslie | August 29, 2007 12:24 PM

Leslie: I think Joan's story is probably pretty fascinating, but the blog entry just focused on all of the big events (move here, move there, kid arrives, etc.) -- it was kind of like a travelogue of her life, without much discussion of how any of those particular events affected her or her family. I didn't think she was bragging or complaining; it's just that I'm much more interested in the internal stuff -- don't care so much about what happened as what it meant (obstacles, struggles, choices, effects). Like Frieda's blog last week about their considerations in moving back to NO.

I agree with you that this generation of women is fascinating (that's my mom's generation, so I got to live some of that as an interested observer). But the "what" of their accomplishments loses impact without the "why" and the "how." Which is just hard to fit into a blog.

I do agree with you that there's been some mean-spiritedness -- sort of along the lines of, well, I do all that without a housekeeper, so how is your accomplishment so great? But that's what the "why" and "how" address -- it helps put those accomplishments into perspective, show the real struggles she faced.

Posted by: laura33 | August 29, 2007 1:02 PM

The weight goes to her chest! That's how she got to be a cheerleader-pay attention!

Hillary it would be nice if it went to my rear, but alas, it is all baby. I also can't count because I have only gained 14 pounds total. Bad at math.

Posted by: Irishgirl | August 29, 2007 1:08 PM

The weight goes to her chest! That's how she got to be a cheerleader-pay attention!

Hillary it would be nice if it went to my rear, but alas, it is all baby. I also can't count because I have only gained 14 pounds total. Bad at math.

Posted by: Irishgirl | August 29, 2007 1:08 PM

Leslie- I agree with the others here. Saying "it was a struggle" isn't stimulating. What was the struggle? What were the roadblocks? How did you get aroung them? I guess some guidance for the writer would have helped. On the other hand, your posts are MUCH more interesting than those of Stacey Garfunkel. I like her blog when someone else writes it.

Posted by: atb2 | August 29, 2007 1:09 PM

Greg M. Schmidt '06 writes in the May 12, 2006 edition of the Crimson:

"An imminent Harvard graduate, pondering what to do with the phase of life that starts with graduation and ends with death, might find the beginnings of guidance in the directive written atop Dexter Gate. . . . [I]t reads, 'Depart to serve better thy country and thy kind.' Seeking further guidance, the graduate would find none; the instruction offers little insight into how, exactly, we are supposed to 'serve better' once we depart.

"Should we define such 'service' broadly, as all actions that benefit others or society, whether they are direct or not, whether they are selfless or not? Or should we define it narrowly, as only those actions that help others directly and are performed selflessly? . . .

"It's easy to draw the simple distinction that direct, selfless service is good and that all else is bad; I've been guilty of drawing such distinctions myself. But as I prepare to enter the world I would hope to improve, I can't deny that while the world needs labor organizers, it also needs businessmen who understand that well-paid workers with health care plans are productive workers, just as while the world needs public school teachers, it also needs politicians who will not sell out their constituents at the drop of a hat. The world needs our best, most talented, most caring, and most thoughtful people doing work that helps people directly, but we also need them everywhere else."

The Orthotic Prosthetic Center is a private, profit-making outfit whose efforts benefit others. Indeed, if its efforts did not benefit others, it would soon go out of business. Should we not say, therefore, that the Weintrob family does indeed "serve better thy country and thy kind"?

Posted by: MattInAberdeen | August 29, 2007 1:11 PM

Matt- Only if they help out those who can't afford the VERY expensive orthotics. For profit medicine creeps me out a bit.

Posted by: atb2 | August 29, 2007 1:14 PM

women can be misogynists too.

and oh my god, she had a housekeeper! who also took care of her children while she worked! what is the world coming to?

how else is a working mom supposed to work? are women supposed to work and care for children and shop and cook and clean all by ourselves? (when do we sleep then?)

i do feel defensive here. because so many people are attacking a successful female entrepreneur unfairly. and when you attack this woman, you attack all of us trying to work and raise kids simultaneously.

i'm going back to vacationland!

Posted by: leslie4 | August 29, 2007 1:16 PM

Leslie, I too, commented that Joan's blog yesterday "smacked of elitism." But this is consistent with my other posts regarding people who have all sorts of financial and emotional support, then speak of some sort of lack of balance or other perceived hardship. I think the women in atb's family are inspiring in their ability to overcome hardship and raise their families in an era when divorce would ruin a woman's social standing.

Certainly what Joan accomplished as a businesswoman is laudable, particulalry because she is making a difference in the lives of others (I, too, would rather have heard about that). No one here has disputed that.

As far as women entrepreneurs who have built businesses while overcoming obstacles and trying to achieve balance, my hat goes off to Paula Deen, who overcame agoraphobia, went through a difficult divorce, raised two boys on her own and built a built a very successful catering and restaurant business and is now a celebrity chef. That's what I call an inspirational story of building a business and finding balance.

Posted by: pepperjade | August 29, 2007 1:19 PM

are women supposed to work and care for children and shop and cook and clean all by ourselves?

There are regular posters on this board who do exactly that, as single parents. There are others who do all this work with their spouse but no outside help.

Leslie, meet the real world.

Posted by: mehitabel | August 29, 2007 1:19 PM

"i do feel defensive here. because so many people are attacking a successful female entrepreneur unfairly. and when you attack this woman, you attack all of us trying to work and raise kids simultaneously."

NOT TRUE! That is a group think mentality. People are different, just because you were born with a vagina does not give you a pass for accountability from other women.

Posted by: pATRICK | August 29, 2007 1:22 PM

"i do feel defensive here. because so many people are attacking a successful female entrepreneur unfairly. and when you attack this woman, you attack all of us trying to work and raise kids simultaneously."

Baloney. Take some responsibility for breaking this blog into Parts 1 and 2, such that opinions were formed based on what Laura accurately describes as the travelogue or Part 1, and Part 2 did nothing to dispel that impression.

Perhaps if Joan's editor - hint, hint - had run her piece as a single unit, it would have struck a different note.

Perhaps if Joan's editor had encouraged her to focus on her struggles and how valuable the support of her husband and children were, rather than spend precious words on references to the benefits of her resources, e.g., the tux, the housekeeper, her column would have struck a different note.

Perhaps if Joan's editor had encouraged her to participate in the blog on the day of its publication, her comments might have fleshed out the missing, and maybe interesting, bits of her story, her column would have struck a different note.

Regardless, commenting on how one women tells her story is not an attack on all working moms - what a ridiculous, over-the-top statement.

Posted by: MN | August 29, 2007 1:23 PM

are women supposed to work and care for children and shop and cook and clean all by ourselves?

And who do you think does all this for the mothers who work as nannies and domestics? The irony...

Posted by: mehitabel | August 29, 2007 1:23 PM

"how else is a working mom supposed to work? are women supposed to work and care for children and shop and cook and clean all by ourselves? (when do we sleep then?)"

it's not original, but would you like some cheese to go with that whine?

all by our li'l ol' lonesomes, moms do all these things all the time. Some even attend school at night. Heck, there are single dads who do all those things. You really are sheltered.

Posted by: MN | August 29, 2007 1:26 PM

What MN said -- excellent points!

Posted by: mehitabel | August 29, 2007 1:26 PM

"i'm going back to vacationland!"

Leslie, Leslie, Leslie. Just as with pATRICK and his daily rum and cokes, you cannot escape reality by pretending it does not exist. There are very serious posters on this blog who are questioning this woman and what she has "accomplished". Are you not willing to engage them in real debate? If not, what does that say about you? This is a blog, Leslie. It is a forum for dissent. You are supposed to engage the dissenters, not merely run away to "vacationland".

Posted by: bababooey666 | August 29, 2007 1:27 PM

Leslie,

I don't know where to start with your meanness remark. I and others made comments about this woman's seemingly fabulous life. We only know what she told us and what she told us was basically. I went to college, married my husband who needed a tux, it still fits, I had kids and switched between being a part time mom and a full time mom (insulting), moved to DC had a wonderful life, wanted to compete with the boys (what did they do to you to hold you back, seriously) started a company and now my son works there too.

Here is my grandma's story: had five kids who she kept alive through the depression by growing a garden and pulling together resources with other neighbors, went to work at a pottery until it closed down shuffling her kids between family and friends while my granddad worked or slept, granddad was hurt in a mine collapse that cost him his ability to work, grandma got another job with a brick yard but had to quit because the lady she rode to work with decided not to work anymore. No help from nannies, no house keepers and no tears. Yeah, she didn't build a business or anything spectacular and my granddad was lucky to have shoes let alone a tux, but she did raise five good kids who went on to contribute to the world and raise good kids.

So yeah, here I sit unimpressed with her tale of whoa about feeling alone in Dayton and crying. I see no struggles in her life that would lead me to relate to her at all. Maybe it's just me; maybe you had the same kind of life and can relate to her kind of balance.

Posted by: Irishgirl | August 29, 2007 1:28 PM

"how else is a working mom supposed to work? are women supposed to work and care for children and shop and cook and clean all by ourselves? (when do we sleep then?)"

OMG, Leslie. I believe you have officially lost any support you will ever get from this group. ARE YOU KIDDING ME? Do you really think all working moms have HELP?!?!?!?!? You are off your rocker.

Posted by: atb2 | August 29, 2007 1:33 PM

Posted by: Irishgirl | August 29, 2007 01:28 PM

Well, when you have had high level corporate life, you tend to forget what "reality" really is. I can tell you having dealt with wealthy people they tend to be clueless about how the vast majority of people really live.

Posted by: pATRICK | August 29, 2007 1:33 PM

Posted by: mehitabel | August 29, 2007 01:19 PM

Posted by: MN | August 29, 2007 01:26 PM

Yes, that describes me. I have done it alone since my daughter was five. No husband, no child support, no nannies, no extended family. I cook, clean, shop, take my daughter to school, pick her up, all those normal things that parents do...

Posted by: pepperjade | August 29, 2007 1:34 PM

ARE YOU KIDDING ME? Do you really think all working moms have HELP?!?!?!?!? You are off your rocker.

Posted by: atb | August 29, 2007 01:33 PM

In LESLIE'S world, yes. housekeepers, nannies etc. Welcome to the world of self absorbed privilige.

Posted by: pATRICK | August 29, 2007 1:35 PM

*read's scarry's response*

*claps* *whistles* *claps*

Posted by: MN | August 29, 2007 1:35 PM

«the directive written atop Dexter Gate. . . . [I]t reads, Depart to serve better thy country and thy kind.»
«Posted by: MattInAberdeen | August 29, 2007 01:11 PM »

O Matt, Mr. Dexter's gate, it reads only two third parts of what it should read. Why does it not also say, to serve better thy Creator? «Serve only Allah or face the doom of a tremendous day» Qur'an Sura 46 verse 21. Yale, if Mr. Dexter had gone to Yale, like our Presidents G. H. W. Bush and his son, «For Allah, for Country and for Yale» is what is carved on Yale's tower, why not combine the best of both carvings, why not say, «Depart, to serve better Allah, thy Country, thy Kind, and Yale»?

Posted by: abu_ibrahim | August 29, 2007 1:37 PM

The other day, I saw two young boys crossing a very busy street with their hispanic nanny. The boys were 4-5 years old, not holding her hand and she seemed oblivious. The only thought that ran through my mind was 'How sad that the mom and dad were too busy to parent their precious children and found something more important to do, like probably vacationing than care for the kids.

Posted by: pATRICK | August 29, 2007 1:39 PM

I would love to see Joan spend one week in Scarry's grandma's world...

Posted by: pepperjade | August 29, 2007 1:41 PM

Law & Order:OB
Episode - Mutiny

Posted by: hillary1 | August 29, 2007 1:41 PM

The most dire circumstances in the United States pale in comparison with what many African mothers must deal with.

And yet, that does not mean the US situation is not difficult, or not worth talking about.

Posted by: scoutfinch | August 29, 2007 1:42 PM

Leslie, check out the article in the Sunday WaPo re the recent graduate of Dominion HS in Sterling who's been taking care of her mother who's disabled with MS, as well as a 9-year-old step-brother, with minimal outside help -- now while attending university as well.

"When a Kid Becomes the Caregiver
Like Thousands of Teens, Va. Student Looks After a Chronically Ill Relative":
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/08/24/AR2007082402352.html

Posted by: mehitabel | August 29, 2007 1:43 PM

Leslie, you know I love you, but I have to side with the peanut gallery on this one. I just don't see that Joan has accomplished anything so spectacular. I think her story is interesting as most people's stories are, but beyond that, I see it as I saw it yesterday: a somewhat privileged woman who was ambitious enough to end up starting her own company. I would like to know more about why her son is following in her footsteps, because I think that's particularly admirable. But I would bet that the overwhelming majority of those who post to this blog have a relative (at least one and probably more) in their family tree who overcame greater odds to achieve even more, and without household help and tuxes.

Posted by: WorkingMomX | August 29, 2007 1:43 PM

The other day, I saw two young boys crossing a very busy street with their hispanic nanny. The boys were 4-5 years old, not holding her hand and she seemed oblivious. The only thought that ran through my mind was 'How sad that the mom and dad were too busy to parent their precious children and found something more important to do, like probably vacationing than care for the kids.

Posted by: pATRICK | August 29, 2007 01:39 PM

This doesn't actually sound like you, pATRICK. I'm not sure how the supposed nanny's ethnicity has any impact on your anecdote, but the issue isn't that teh parents are "too busy to parent," the issue is that they don't know how to select responsible, competent, loving childcare. It's not like you to assume that all people who have childcare are "too busy to parent."

Posted by: MN | August 29, 2007 1:43 PM

wow people...hold on a second. Just because she succeeded as an entrepeneur and thus earned some money, doesn't mean we should dump on her for making that money...Come on, give her some due here.

Scarry, your grandma did good! But so did Joan. Her son joined her business! Sure, it would have been nice to know more details on some things, but she did mention those nights she'll never get back, but no matter what, she helped people! That one paragraph shows the balance she struck in her life!!! Read it carefully because striking out in some anti-elitist way.

Posted by: dotted_1 | August 29, 2007 1:46 PM

This doesn't actually sound like you, pATRICK. I'm not sure how the supposed nanny's ethnicity has any impact on your anecdote, but the issue isn't that teh parents are "too busy to parent," the issue is that they don't know how to select responsible, competent, loving childcare. It's not like you to assume that all people who have childcare are "too busy to parent."

Well, i think the context of what I meant has obviously not been conveyed. The ethnicity is irrelevant. The point was that down here we have a lot of women who don't work and DONT'parent. They go to the club, get nails done, work out and hire someone to do the day to day parenting grunt work. I think that is disgusting and that is what i wanted to convey. Guess I should have been more clear.

Posted by: pATRICK | August 29, 2007 1:46 PM

change because to before above...my typo typoed....he he he

Posted by: dotted_1 | August 29, 2007 1:47 PM

Posted by: scoutfinch | August 29, 2007 01:42 PM

You don't have to leave the borders of the U.S. to see this...try visiting an Indian reservation that does not have casino gambling revenue. There are 80,000 members of the Navajo Nation that must haul their own water from wells. Many of these are elderly people.

Posted by: pepperjade | August 29, 2007 1:48 PM

«how else is a working mom supposed to work? are women supposed to work and care for children and shop and cook and clean all by ourselves? (when do we sleep then?)»
«i do feel defensive here. because so many people are attacking a successful female entrepreneur unfairly. and when you attack this woman, you attack all of us trying to work and raise kids simultaneously.
«i'm going back to vacationland!»
«Posted by: leslie | August 29, 2007 01:16 PM »

«There are regular posters on this board who do exactly that, as single parents. There are others who do all this work with their spouse but no outside help.
«Leslie, meet the real world.»
«Posted by: mehitabel | August 29, 2007 01:19 PM »

O Ladies, this is like a dialogue between archy and mehitabel. archy's typewriter, he cannot hold down the shift key on it, all his part of the dialog, it is in small letters, no capitals, «i'm going back to vacationland».. Mehitabel, she replies, she «can» hold down the shift key, capital «T» in «There», capital «L» in «Leslie». The spirit of Mr. Don Marquis, he is looking down from Paradise at «On Balance», he is smiling today in Paradise.

Posted by: abu_ibrahim | August 29, 2007 1:49 PM

pATRICK, How do you know those kids' mom wasn't at work? I see nannies with kids all the time in my neighborhood, which isn't a "rich" place. I'm assuming both parents are at work.

Posted by: atb2 | August 29, 2007 1:49 PM

«are women supposed to work and care for children and shop and cook and clean all by ourselves?»

«And who do you think does all this for the mothers who work as nannies and domestics? The irony...»
«Posted by: mehitabel | August 29, 2007 01:23 PM »

The mothers who work as nannies and domestics, the ironing, they used to have to do it, but now most clothing is drip dry, no ironing needed, these mothers have more free time, they can tend more to their own children in the quarters out back behind the big house.

Posted by: abu_ibrahim | August 29, 2007 1:53 PM

I would love to see Joan spend one week in Scarry's grandma's world...

Oh my gosh, I couldn't make it in her world or for that matter my mom's young world. I didn't mean to sound in Leslie's terms "mean" and I hate to use this word, but she did sound elitist.

Hillary you last post is def qoute of the day.

Posted by: Irishgirl | August 29, 2007 1:59 PM

thanks for explaining, pATRICK. I understand where you were going, now.

Posted by: MN | August 29, 2007 2:04 PM

I didn't do that.

Posted by: pATRICK | August 29, 2007 2:11 PM

Huh?

Posted by: MN | August 29, 2007 2:11 PM

pATRICK, I think you must've accidentally blocked, then copied and pasted today's entire blog board. Could you re-post just the part you meant to include, so WaPo can take down the rest without censoring you?

Posted by: mehitabel | August 29, 2007 2:13 PM

"I didn't do that"

You gotta watch what you do with your hands in the Men's Room...

Posted by: hillary1 | August 29, 2007 2:14 PM

"I think you must've accidentally blocked, then copied and pasted today's entire blog board. "

Sounds like the rum & coke man has the shakes...

Posted by: hillary1 | August 29, 2007 2:16 PM

pATRICK, I think you must've accidentally blocked, then copied and pasted today's entire blog board. Could you re-post just the part you meant to include, so WaPo can take down the rest without censoring you?

Posted by: mehitabel | August 29, 2007 02:13 PM

At first that is what I thought happened, but the time sequences are not right. Probably that knucklehead's doing.

Posted by: pATRICK | August 29, 2007 2:18 PM

pATRICK, How do you know those kids' mom wasn't at work? I see nannies with kids all the time in my neighborhood, which isn't a "rich" place. I'm assuming both parents are at work.


Experience

Posted by: pATRICK | August 29, 2007 02:09 PM

this is what i wrote

Posted by: pATRICK | August 29, 2007 2:19 PM

How much should the "worth" of one's work factor into the decision about working full-time, part-time, staying home, etc? If you're in a profession that has a big impact on people's lives, should you think about that when you're making a "balance" decision?

Posted by: barfster | August 29, 2007 08:49 AM

Great question Barfster. I really think this is one of the things people need to discuss and decide upon before they choose to raise a child.

Yes, life can (and will) change and opportunities will come and all that- but once you choose to make that child priority, that's it. That is where it is and where it will stay. And since THEY won't get the choice to stay with you or leave to find someone who will do what needs to be done, it's really a choice that needs to be made before it happens, and stuck with.

Posted by: EmeraldEAD | August 29, 2007 2:27 PM

EmeraldEAD: life's not that simple, at least not for anyone I know. Sometimes people say they want to stay home, then they find out that they aren't capable. Or vice versa. Or they're happy at home for several years, then they realize they really need to go out and get a job. Or a spouse is laid off and a new job is needed.

Or a million things. To say one has to have it all figured out before a child is conceived is quite naive.

Posted by: atlmom1234 | August 29, 2007 2:40 PM

EDGAR, NE--Residents of the small town of Edgar have yet to come up with a fitting name for the tiny village's most highly trafficked street, a two-lane, tree-lined roadway running through the main downtown area.

"At first we wanted to call it Preeminent Avenue or Primary Lane, or maybe even Boulevard Prime," said local businessman Peter Gallows, who added that the street is the one he mainly uses when driving through town. "It's really important that we name this soon, being that it's the main street around and all."

Edgar mayor Tom Kaisel said he hopes to resolve the problem before mid-October, when the town holds its as-yet-unnamed annual German-themed festival, informally known as "Oktobeparty."

Posted by: KLB_SS_MD | August 29, 2007 2:48 PM

Well said, atlmom. Responsible parents plan before a child enters the family, but they plan based on the facts as they then understand them. Life isn't static. Health changes. Jobs change. The health of grandparents changes. If parents don't adjust, but cling to decisions that were right for their family when applied to circumstances no longer in existence, what sort of life skills are they going to pass on to those kids?

"No! You have to be the breadwinner and I get to stay home because that's what we decided before we had Stacey Amanda!"

"But, honey, I was laid off from my job as a mortgage loan officer for a sub-prime lender, and no one is hiring. I don't know how we are going to make it if you don't get a job. I am going to have to train for a new career."

"But that's not how we planned it," she wails and stomps her feet.

Posted by: MN | August 29, 2007 2:51 PM

«EDGAR, NE--Residents of the small town of Edgar have yet to come up with a fitting name for the tiny village's most highly trafficked street, a two-lane, tree-lined roadway running through the main downtown area.»
«Posted by: KLB_SS_MD | August 29, 2007 02:48 PM »

It is a «roadway»? The letter «B», they can just add the letter «B» to «roadway», they can call their main street «Broadway», it worked for NYC, why not for Edgar, NE?

Posted by: abu_ibrahim | August 29, 2007 2:53 PM

"To say one has to have it all figured out before a child is conceived is quite naive."

So true. Sure, you should talk about it, plan, understand what your family priorities are - but don't think that it will always be that way. Even if you both said you wanted one thing before hand, once you're actually there one or both of you may find it isn't working and you'll have to work through that and find a new situation.

One thing that struck me in reading the two-day's blog was that it sounded like the author made her choices about work without regard to other obligations, I assume because the family always relied on the husband's salary as the primary means of support (though I admit I did not read that closely so apologies if this is wrong). I don't know a lot of families that function (or at least not well) that way now - I think in most cases there's some push and pull and re-balancing based on the needs of the couple and the family as a whole, not just on the desires of one.

Posted by: LizaBean | August 29, 2007 2:56 PM

that is great, KLB.

There's a street in Atlanta that is Boulevard. It's not funny to me anymore - since I've been here forever, but when you first are told that you go WHAAAA?

Otherwise, my favorite street in atlanta is old wheat street. Love that name.

Posted by: atlmom1234 | August 29, 2007 2:56 PM

Helmsley left 12m to a dog, what a fitting legacy for a nasty woman.

Posted by: pATRICK | August 29, 2007 3:00 PM

LizaBean - great point. That's one of the major disconnects between Joan's story and everyone else I know. She went back to work because she was bored around the house. She seems to have had the freedom to do whatever she wanted without any impact on household income at all.

Posted by: MN | August 29, 2007 3:01 PM

The street naming is from The Onion.

Posted by: KLB_SS_MD | August 29, 2007 3:02 PM

pATRICK, It could be worse. She could've left it to Michael Vick.

Posted by: mehitabel | August 29, 2007 3:02 PM

I want to affirm pepperjade, OrganicGal, WorkingMomX, irishgirl and all the other posters who pointed out to Leslie that our displeasure with Joan's postings does not translate to hatred of all working women. In fact, I think it affirms our support for women who REALLY have to do it all THEMSELVES.

I, for one, have no sympathy for a person who posts a narrative resume on a blog that addresses balance issues.

In the REAL world, Joan and her ilk are an anomaly. The real world is an interesting place. You should visit it sometime, Leslie.

Posted by: educmom__615 | August 29, 2007 3:04 PM

pATRICK, she also chose to give tons of money to her foundation, and a certain amount to 2 out of 4 grandchildren - cutting 2 of the grandchildren out with a, "they'll know why" comment in the will. I will never understand the use of money to hurt people after you are dead and gone.

Posted by: MN | August 29, 2007 3:06 PM

Posted by: MN | August 29, 2007 03:06 PM

At least the bulk will go to help someone....

Posted by: pATRICK | August 29, 2007 3:08 PM

" I will never understand the use of money to hurt people after you are dead and gone."

Me neither, but at least it's not likely to ever be an issue in my future, LOL!

Posted by: LizaBean | August 29, 2007 3:09 PM

"I will never understand the use of money to hurt people after you are dead and gone."

It's certainly a short-sighted way for the deceased to make sure s/he gets bad-mouthed by those who are cut out, with no way to rebut them.

Posted by: mehitabel | August 29, 2007 3:12 PM

"I will never understand the use of money to hurt people after you are dead and gone."

It's certainly a short-sighted way for the deceased to make sure s/he gets bad-mouthed by those who are cut out, with no way to rebut them.

yep, the weird thing is that she will only be remembered for 2 things, saying paying taxes is for the little people and giving 12m to a dog, all the billions to charity will be forgotten. What a sad legacy.

Posted by: pATRICK | August 29, 2007 3:16 PM

pATRICK,

I'd withhold judgment on whether donating a whole bunch of money to a charitable trust named after yourself is the equivalent of "donating to charity". I googled the trust and there is no evidence that ANY money is being given out in grants or otherwise. Most trusts fall all over themselves to generate press releases announcing their good deeds, e.g, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. This trust may be nothing more than a way for Leona Helmsley's estate to avoid being taxed - which would be consistent with her life plan of paying as little tax as possible. It's impossible to know.

Posted by: MN | August 29, 2007 3:24 PM

Posted by: MN | August 29, 2007 03:24 PM

I suspect you are right, unfortunately

Posted by: pATRICK | August 29, 2007 3:29 PM

Man o Man, I couldn't stay away from Leslie's meltdown. She needs the vacation.

Glad to see all the pregnant ladies are well. Patrick, sorry about your family situation. Lil Husky - MEOW! You will be back you crazy dog.

Leslie - you have lost it. Womankind does not rise and fall because of your column. According to you women can not critique each other at all - it is considered tearing them down. You are being thin skinned about this column and I am sure even Mrs. Weintrob knows her column was not particularly compelling. Her life may be but the column was not written well - it sounded a bit elitist.

What bothers me the most is that you believe unless one is a "world class" physician, lawyer or Chief muckety-muck then they don't deserve high praise. I am always weary of people that have to shout from the mountain top what their achievements are - only in this case you are yelling about someone else's life.

Posted by: cmac | August 29, 2007 3:32 PM

"There's a street in Atlanta that is Boulevard. It's not funny to me anymore - since I've been here forever, but when you first are told that you go WHAAAA?"

Posted by: atlmom1234 | August 29, 2007 02:56 PM

There used to be a street in New Haven named, "Boulevard," too. It's Route 10, at the western edge of the city. It has since been renamed, "Ella T. Grasso Boulevard" after the one-time governor of Connecticut, who died in 1981. If Atlantans don't want people going "WHAAA?", they can take a leaf from Connecticut and rename Boulevard after a famous, now-departed governor of Georgia. How does, "Lester G. Maddox Boulevard" sound?

Posted by: MattInAberdeen | August 29, 2007 3:35 PM

We will log in tomorrow to find LESLIE has banned all of us.

Posted by: pATRICK | August 29, 2007 3:35 PM

Hi, CMAC. You make an excellent point. By extending Leslie's logic, a woman should support and vote for all female political candidates regardless of affiliation just because they're women -- even if there's a male candidate who better represents her views.

Posted by: mehitabel | August 29, 2007 3:37 PM

any time now pittypat will come along and agree with Leslie.

Posted by: gcoward | August 29, 2007 3:40 PM

Please: constructive criticism is not misogyny. We are criticizing the way she wrote her piece, and what she so appropriately chose to leave out. This is a blog, not a parade. Good to know that she overcame a lot but her communication skills and what insight she can give us and what's on trial here; not how cool you or other people think she is. In all of us she never mentions working because she had to (pay the bills, or money being tight, or anything) instead indicates that she did. And yet, there is little to no passion about her work up until maybe the very end. Where is the passion? And where is the balance?

Posted by: _Miles | August 29, 2007 3:40 PM

Hi, CMAC. You make an excellent point. By extending Leslie's logic, a woman should support and vote for all female political candidates regardless of affiliation just because they're women -- even if there's a male candidate who better represents her views.

Posted by: mehitabel | August 29, 2007 03:37 PM

You forgot should also give raises to all women in the workplace and fire men. Who cares about accountability for hard work done. The author here is being graded on her work, not on being a woman. And we are grading her low.

Posted by: _Miles | August 29, 2007 3:42 PM

"The author here is being graded on her work, not on being a woman. And we are grading her low."

Posted by: _Miles | August 29, 2007 03:42 PM

No, she is being graded here on her writing, and y'all are grading her low. Only someone who has dealt with the Orthotic Prosthetic Center can grade Mrs. Weintrob on her work. One happy kid with a decent artificial limb outweighs all the sniping we've seen today on this blog. She is serving her country and her kind. Quit griping!

Posted by: MattInAberdeen | August 29, 2007 3:48 PM

"She is serving her country and her kind."


What is the basis for this conclusion?

Posted by: gcoward | August 29, 2007 3:52 PM

Leslie,

I'm forced to agree with the people who've already spoken up about the unsuitability of this post. This guest blog basically came across as a travelogue, with some family anecdotes thrown in. It didn't seem to have much to do with her decisions to balance work and family, and read more like a history of her decision to make a living in a particular field.

The people who have pointed this out have (I'm sure) no personal connection to Joan whatsoever. (I know I don't.) This comment certainly isn't intended as an attack on her life or her lifestyle. But using this particular piece of writing as an example of "balance" is a little specious. I'm sure she has a very interesting take on the concept of work-life balance, but it doesn't come across in this piece.

It also seems like you are taking some of these comments a little personally. Calling people mean and mysogynistic comes across more like a schoolyard taunt than a reasoned rebuttal to a legitimate critique. And if her work was supposed to be off-limits to comment, why post it in a blog format? Why not write an article about her for the regular WaPo site? Please don't insult the people who read your blog, and care enough to take time from their day to comment in it. And don't blame us if we differ in our opinion of your guest writers.

Posted by: popslashgirl | August 29, 2007 3:53 PM

Hi, CMAC. You make an excellent point. By extending Leslie's logic, a woman should support and vote for all female political candidates regardless of affiliation just because they're women -- even if there's a male candidate who better represents her views.

Posted by: mehitabel | August 29, 2007 03:37 PM

No christmas card for you from NOW, you're off the list! ;)

Posted by: pATRICK | August 29, 2007 3:53 PM

Well, Matt, we do (no joke) have a cynthia mckinney parkway. So I would rather deal with boulevard than allowing more politicians to name streets (or things) after themselves. That's how we got Hartsfield/Jackson airport (Jackson's wife told everyone how he wanted to desperately to have his name on the airport, after he died. I mean, really - is that all I have to do to get things named after me?).

Posted by: atlmom1234 | August 29, 2007 3:55 PM

pATRICK, I suspect NOW would agree with me that issues are more important than gender in a political candidate.

Posted by: mehitabel | August 29, 2007 3:57 PM

"'She is serving her country and her kind.'"

"What is the basis for this conclusion?"

Posted by: gcoward | August 29, 2007 03:52 PM

Scroll up to my posting of 1:11 PM today. No, wait, I'll save you the trouble:

"The Orthotic Prosthetic Center is a private, profit-making outfit whose efforts benefit others. Indeed, if its efforts did not benefit others, it would soon go out of business. Should we not say, therefore, that the Weintrob family does indeed 'serve better thy country and thy kind'?"

Posted by: MattInAberdeen | August 29, 2007 01:11 PM

Businesses come and businesses go,
The earth is green or white with snow.
Don't serve the public, and naught will avail,
Your business is surely doomed to fail.

OPC has been in business since the start of 1980. That's proof that it must be serving its customers. This is America, buddy -- nothing succeeds like success.

Posted by: MattInAberdeen | August 29, 2007 4:04 PM

"The author here is being graded on her work, not on being a woman. And we are grading her low."

Posted by: _Miles | August 29, 2007 03:42 PM

No, she is being graded here on her writing, and y'all are grading her low. Only someone who has dealt with the Orthotic Prosthetic Center can grade Mrs. Weintrob on her work. One happy kid with a decent artificial limb outweighs all the sniping we've seen today on this blog. She is serving her country and her kind. Quit griping!

Posted by: MattInAberdeen | August 29, 2007 03:48 PM

Sorry I meant "work" as in the work she has done here, the work she did to put together the post. Guess I get a C- for my work :(

Posted by: _Miles | August 29, 2007 4:05 PM

My wife is a tiny bit like Leslie, she had to get her drivers license renewed in person and you know that there are all sorts of characters at the DMV. She was a little shocked, I told her "Honey not everyone is a VP". I think it was good for her and I secretly got a laugh out of it.

Posted by: pATRICK | August 29, 2007 4:07 PM

Miles, I knew what you meant. People are criticizing the way the blog was written and the presumptions that seem to underlie it. I haven't seen anyone criticizing her as a working woman/working mom/woman entrepeuner etc. Though of course there's probably one or two across two days of comments (I haven't read them all myself) but that doesn't seem to the bulk of the commentary.

Posted by: LizaBean | August 29, 2007 4:19 PM

"The Orthotic Prosthetic Center is a private, profit-making outfit whose efforts benefit others. Indeed, if its efforts did not benefit others, it would soon go out of business. Should we not say, therefore, that the Weintrob family does indeed 'serve better thy country and thy kind'?"

By using this logic all the oil companies 'serve better thy country and thy kind' as they are private, profit-making outfits also. Show me the philanthropy - the reduced rate for someone without insurance. I am not saying that the company does not do this - kudos if they do. If they do I would love to have read about how to balance a for profit business with the needs of your clients.

Posted by: KLB_SS_MD | August 29, 2007 4:26 PM

Patrick, I've definitely known a lot of people in that category. After my brother's wedding, I drove one of his friends to the bus station in the middle of the afternoon. This guy asked me to stay with him until his bus came because he doesn't like "those people."

Posted by: LizaBean | August 29, 2007 4:26 PM

pATRICK and LizaBean, We once gave a ride (250 mile trip) to a girlfriend of mine and her mother. The mother had never used a gas station restroom before in her life. Thank goodness the one where we stopped was clean and modern!

Posted by: mehitabel | August 29, 2007 4:31 PM

"'She is serving her country and her kind.'"

"What is the basis for this conclusion?"

Posted by: gcoward | August 29, 2007 03:52 PM

Scroll up to my posting of 1:11 PM today. No, wait, I'll save you the trouble:

"The Orthotic Prosthetic Center is a private, profit-making outfit whose efforts benefit others. Indeed, if its efforts did not benefit others, it would soon go out of business. Should we not say, therefore, that the Weintrob family does indeed 'serve better thy country and thy kind'?"

Posted by: MattInAberdeen | August 29, 2007 01:11 PM

Businesses come and businesses go,
The earth is green or white with snow.
Don't serve the public, and naught will avail,
Your business is surely doomed to fail.

OPC has been in business since the start of 1980. That's proof that it must be serving its customers. This is America, buddy -- nothing succeeds like success.

Posted by: MattInAberdeen | August 29, 2007 04:04 PM

So selling products is the equivalent of serving one's country? That's one of the more illogical things you've said - even more inane than a child is a good person if its parents teach it right from wrong.

Posted by: gcoward | August 29, 2007 4:45 PM

Posted by: mehitabel | August 29, 2007 04:31 PM

that reminds me of a friend of mine, he said he was taking his son "camping". I said great where? He said on 18th fairway at the country club. I said Great have fun! I then got off the phone and didn't know whether to laugh my guts out or shake my head in sadness. (laughter won out). Just the thought of all those people "camping' on a golf course, was too funny.

Posted by: pATRICK | August 29, 2007 4:46 PM

hmm, looks like so far we've got the dead hand and the invisible hand on the blog, we're on a roll...

Posted by: LizaBean | August 29, 2007 4:53 PM

"So selling products is the equivalent of serving one's country? That's one of the more illogical things you've said - even more inane than a child is a good person if its parents teach it right from wrong."

Posted by: gcoward | August 29, 2007 04:45 PM

Go read Greg Schmidt's Crimson article, the one I was quoting from at 1:11 PM. Here is a URL:

http://www.thecrimson.com/printerfriendly.aspx?ref=513451

Mr. Schmidt was an undergraduate when he wrote this article in May, 2006. Among other things, he wrote:

"Others do not pursue such directly-defined 'service' pursuits during their college years, instead waiting to make their contribution to the outside world in their post-graduate work--work that often falls into the oft-maligned field of business, investment banking, or consulting."

And:

"Those who pursue politics or direct service are not unquestionably virtuous (or, at any rate, not unquestionably successful in maximizing the good they can do), nor are those who pursue business unquestionably craven. When it comes to serving our country and our kind, what matters most may not be the paths we choose, but the principles to which we adhere."

Mr. Schmidt is no longer a mere college student. He is now a Harvard graduate. If you think it's "illogical" and "inane" to say that pursuing a business is serving one's country and one's kind, then you're arguing with a Harvard graduate.

Posted by: MattInAberdeen | August 29, 2007 4:55 PM

"If you think it's "illogical" and "inane" to say that pursuing a business is serving one's country and one's kind, then you're arguing with a Harvard graduate."

And we would never want to do that now would we? The Ken Lay served our country well didn't he!

Posted by: KLB_SS_MD | August 29, 2007 4:57 PM

"then you're arguing with a Harvard graduate."

Oh no! Far be it from us lowly masses to argue with...gasp! A Harvard Graduate? I'm shaking in my boots! Good grief, Matt.

Posted by: LizaBean | August 29, 2007 4:58 PM

LizaBean, Do you think it would be ok if it was a Yale graduate we were disagreeing with?

Posted by: KLB_SS_MD | August 29, 2007 5:00 PM

If you think it's "illogical" and "inane" to say that pursuing a business is serving one's country and one's kind, then you're arguing with a Harvard graduate.

Posted by: MattInAberdeen | August 29, 2007 04:55 PM

You have an odd and unhealthy obsession with undergraduate alma maters. Would you cease to block and copy this person's words if he was a graduate of Middle Tennessee State University?

The value of an idea is in its logic and sense. The academic pedigree of an illogical idea's utterer is only impressive to a man who can't think for himself and is impressed by faerie dust.

Posted by: gcoward | August 29, 2007 5:01 PM

Gosh, KLB, that's a tough call. I'm betting we're not allowed to argue with any of the Ivies, except maybe Brown...

Posted by: LizaBean | August 29, 2007 5:01 PM

As I re-read what matt quoted "When it comes to serving our country and our kind, what matters most may not be the paths we choose, but the principles to which we adhere." understanding is very different from matt's "making money = service to country and kind".
I read it more as an idea of the principles you bring to your particular endeavor making the most difference vs the money.

Posted by: KLB_SS_MD | August 29, 2007 5:07 PM

If you think it's "illogical" and "inane" to say that pursuing a business is serving one's country and one's kind, then you're arguing with a Harvard graduate.

Posted by: MattInAberdeen | August 29, 2007 04:55 PM

I didn't realize there were rules on this blog favoring the thoughts and ideas of Harvard graduates. How amusing. I can't imagine He Who Must Not Be Named tolerating such elitism, so I suspect he'll be along any minute to utter the alternative viewpoint.

Posted by: MN | August 29, 2007 5:07 PM

Re Ivy League: Maybe Cream of the Crop is one of Matt's alter egos.

Posted by: mehitabel | August 29, 2007 5:11 PM

KLB - The quoted speaker appears to be responding to those who believe the only way to virtuously serve your country, e.g., to do the most good, is to enter into a life of public service. His words do not support the conclusion that establishing any business that happens to stay afloat for X number of years is necessarily serving one's country -- unless you conclude that pretty much anything you do is serving your country as long as you don't file for bankruptcy.

Ms. Weintroub and her business may well be serving her community. We don't know. But Matt's Hahhhvahhhd quote doesn't offer guidance either way.

Posted by: MN | August 29, 2007 5:13 PM

"As I re-read what matt quoted 'When it comes to serving our country and our kind, what matters most may not be the paths we choose, but the principles to which we adhere.' understanding is very different from matt's 'making money = service to country and kind'."

Posted by: KLB_SS_MD | August 29, 2007 05:07 PM

I didn't write "making money = service to country and kind." I wrote, "OPC has been in business since the start of 1980. That's proof that it must be serving its customers. This is America, buddy -- nothing succeeds like success" (4:04 PM). Serving your customers is indeed a way of serving your country and your kind. Obviously, Greg Schmidt's "principles to which we adhere" limit, or ought to limit, the quality of this service. If you're cheating your customers, or if your customers are using your products for evil, you're not serving your country or your kind by selling to them. I have no reason to believe that the Orthotic Prosthetic Center is doing any such thing, which is why I believe the Weintrobs are serving their country and their kind. And certainly, the fact that they have been in business so long is evidence that they are serving their customers, meeting their customers' needs.

"I read it more as an idea of the principles you bring to your particular endeavor making the most difference vs the money." (KLB_SS_MD).

Then we agree, and neither of us has to worry about arguing with Greg M. Schmidt, Harvard '06.

Posted by: MattInAberdeen | August 29, 2007 5:20 PM

Mehitabel, would that it were, but I think that attitude is more prevalent than we'd like to think.

KLB, I agree. Those quotations seem to state the relatively straightforward proposition that there is not a direct relationship between doing good in the world and non-profit work. Not bad for a Harvard Graduate.

Posted by: LizaBean | August 29, 2007 5:20 PM

LizaBean,

I suppose this means that Matt is an Obama man, since otherwise he might be put in the ackward position of arguing with a Harvard graduate. Imagine the stress.

Posted by: MN | August 29, 2007 5:24 PM

MN, LOL. The horrors! What do you think happens when two Harvard Graduates disagree with each other? Spontaneous combustion?

Posted by: LizaBean | August 29, 2007 5:25 PM

I think their heads turn all the way around and the spit pea soup.

Posted by: KLB_SS_MD | August 29, 2007 5:27 PM

LizaBean for FQOTD!

Posted by: mehitabel | August 29, 2007 5:27 PM

MN, LOL. The horrors! What do you think happens when two Harvard Graduates disagree with each other? Spontaneous combustion?


Ever notice Harvard people have to interject that they went to HARVARD at least once in every conversation? "Do you know where the porta potty is ? " "Yes, it the blue one over by the hot dogs, which looks simialr to the one I used when I was at Haaavvvaaard."

Posted by: pATRICK | August 29, 2007 5:29 PM

"I didn't realize there were rules on this blog favoring the thoughts and ideas of Harvard graduates. How amusing."

Posted by: MN | August 29, 2007 05:07 PM

MN, who do you think picks the topic for the "On Balance" blog every day?

Posted by: MattInAberdeen | August 29, 2007 5:30 PM

pATRICK - LOL. You're so right.

Meanwhile, they spend every minute they are enrolled whipping out their appendages to prove whose is largest.

Posted by: MN | August 29, 2007 5:31 PM

pATRICK,
Your comment caused alcohol abuse as I literally spit out a sip of my wine.

Posted by: KLB_SS_MD | August 29, 2007 5:33 PM

who do you think picks the topic for the "On Balance" blog every day?

I could do a damn sight better job, yet I only attended CSSs.

Posted by: mehitabel | August 29, 2007 5:34 PM

MN, who do you think picks the topic for the "On Balance" blog every day?

Posted by: MattInAberdeen | August 29, 2007 05:30 PM

Ah, Matt, an Ivy League grad merely submits a column to her editor. Whether the focus of her column is the focus of the blog is up to the participants. Her pedigree doesn't give her ideas any value. They sink or swim on their own merit or lack thereof.

Is it your position that the ideas of some are worth more than the ideas based on the institutions from which they've completed degree work?

Posted by: MN | August 29, 2007 5:35 PM

. . .than the ideas OF OTHERS based . . .

Posted by: MN | August 29, 2007 5:36 PM

"Is it your position that the ideas of some are worth more than the ideas based on the institutions from which they've completed degree work?

Posted by: MN | August 29, 2007 05:35 PM"

Come now, MN, you should know that all pigs are equal. But some are more equal than others.

Posted by: laura33 | August 29, 2007 5:37 PM

Not that this would ever happen, but it would be fun to have an unlimited amount of wine and have all of us argue around a big table. With a few obvious exceptions........

Posted by: pATRICK | August 29, 2007 5:38 PM

"Is it your position that the ideas of some are worth more than the ideas based on the institutions from which they've completed degree work?"

Posted by: MN | August 29, 2007 05:35 PM

That would be going too far. Consider Ted Kaczynski '62 and his exploding letters, one of which injured a Yale professor. Or Al Gore '69, and his "global warming" scare which serves only to benefit the owners and developers of nuclear power plants.

Posted by: MattInAberdeen | August 29, 2007 5:40 PM

pATRICK, I'd rather have flan.

Posted by: mehitabel | August 29, 2007 5:40 PM

I thought that is what we are doing now pATRICK. I have my wine and we can consider the blog a big round table. The only problem is that some people's chairs are higher than others. Others are trying to make a square table out of a round one. And yet another group is looking under the table for bugs.

Posted by: KLB_SS_MD | August 29, 2007 5:41 PM

laura,

You'd not kiss the boots of any one-armed opponent because of the issuer of the framed diplomas in his office, LOL. You might hire him to make the firm look more posh, though.

Posted by: MN | August 29, 2007 5:42 PM

pATRICK, I'd rather have flan.

Posted by: mehitabel | August 29, 2007 05:40 PM

pATRICK - that means more rum and coke for you, and shiraz for me.

Posted by: MN | August 29, 2007 5:43 PM

MN, sorry, we're not much into posh here -- they tend to want to get paid too much (something about all those student loans. . . .). :-)

Posted by: laura33 | August 29, 2007 5:44 PM

I will stick with either Rose or margarita, ok?

Posted by: KLB_SS_MD | August 29, 2007 5:44 PM

KLB is right. The funny thing is how I picture each of you and gulp, how you picture me. It would be interesting to see how wrong or right i got it. Just late day musings

Posted by: pATRICK | August 29, 2007 5:46 PM

Don't the "real" Ivy leaguers have their education paid for by mumsy and father? No scholarships or loans for them. I think there is a special seal on the diploma for them, visible only to another non-loan/scholarship graduate.

Posted by: KLB_SS_MD | August 29, 2007 5:47 PM

pATRICK,
I am 5'11", 115 lbs, 38-24-36. Blond, blue eyes with a perky waspish nose, strong chin (appropriately for a woman) and high cheekbones.
(If you believe that I have some ocean front property in Nebraska for sale).

Posted by: KLB_SS_MD | August 29, 2007 5:50 PM

"one of which injured a Yale professor"

Clearly, the worst of his sins...

Posted by: LizaBean | August 29, 2007 5:51 PM

KLB - I understand that the division between those who have and don't have the special seal is large. Fortunately, I also understand that employers customarily can't see the special seal. Unfortunately, financial institutions and venture cap firms appear to be able to spot it a mile away and like to see it before they open the coffers for a neophyte with his brand spanking new sheepskin.

The non-seal sorts are the ones Laura doesn't hire, LOL. They are a viciously competitive bunch - after all, that's how they gained admission, and not because Papa's name is on a building.

Posted by: MN | August 29, 2007 5:52 PM

"one of which injured a Yale professor"

Clearly, the worst of his sins...

Posted by: LizaBean | August 29, 2007 05:51 PM

oh, good grief, LizaBean - I missed this one. Some pigs ARE more equal than others.

Posted by: MN | August 29, 2007 5:54 PM

MN and Laura, I am reminded of the one kid in my class of summer associates who did not get an offer from the firm and blamed it on the firm's bias against elite schools. Um, ok...

Posted by: LizaBean | August 29, 2007 5:54 PM

Have a nice evening!

Posted by: pATRICK | August 29, 2007 5:55 PM

Ditto pATRICK.

Posted by: KLB_SS_MD | August 29, 2007 5:56 PM

pATRICK,
I am 5'11", 115 lbs, 38-24-36. Blond, blue eyes with a perky waspish nose, strong chin (appropriately for a woman) and high cheekbones.
(If you believe that I have some ocean front property in Nebraska for sale).

Posted by: KLB_SS_MD | August 29, 2007 05:50 PM

KLB,

I am embarrassed to admit but I'm feeling genormous these days - I'm wearing a size 6. I swear I'll be back in my size 2s by Christmas. I fear it's time to spring for the cheek implants since everything else about me is perfect already.

Posted by: MN | August 29, 2007 5:56 PM

You too, pATRICK, we always had lovely evenings back in my Haaahvard days, you know!

Posted by: LizaBean | August 29, 2007 5:56 PM

MN and Laura, I am reminded of the one kid in my class of summer associates who did not get an offer from the firm and blamed it on the firm's bias against elite schools. Um, ok...

Posted by: LizaBean | August 29, 2007 05:54 PM

There's one in every associate class. Isn't there? Sheesh. Makes you wonder how these types fare in the real world.

Posted by: MN | August 29, 2007 5:58 PM

"Unabomber's act still affects Prof. Gelernter":
http://www.yaledailynews.com/articles/view/19627

Heartbreaking.

Posted by: mehitabel | August 29, 2007 5:58 PM

MN, If you work really really hard you might fit into the size 0s like I do. It is easy - black coffee for breakfast, skim milk and lettuce for lunch and diet soda and broccoli for dinner.
Don't worry, after a few days you get used to the gas.

Posted by: KLB_SS_MD | August 29, 2007 5:58 PM

"Don't the "real" Ivy leaguers have their education paid for by mumsy and father? No scholarships or loans for them. I think there is a special seal on the diploma for them, visible only to another non-loan/scholarship graduate.

Posted by: KLB_SS_MD | August 29, 2007 05:47 PM"

Ok, this explains a lot.

LizaBean, you crack me up. Makes you just want to say, "no, it's because you're an a------."

Posted by: laura33 | August 29, 2007 5:59 PM

MN, You must never have met one of the graduates with the special seal. When they meet someone they feel will be appropriatly honored they hand them the "special seal reading glasses".

Posted by: KLB_SS_MD | August 29, 2007 6:00 PM

MN, You must never have met one of the graduates with the special seal. When they meet someone they feel will be appropriatly honored they hand them the "special seal reading glasses".

Posted by: KLB_SS_MD | August 29, 2007 06:00 PM

I am certain I met one or two in the bars which used to form what was referred to back in the day as The Herpes Triangle, but, sadly, they were always looking over my shoulder for someone bearing the special seal. *sigh* Close call, that, LOL.

Posted by: MN | August 29, 2007 6:03 PM

I wonder what it signifies that the only Harvard grad in my circle of friends was a scholarship student. Oh, the shame of it all.

Posted by: mehitabel | August 29, 2007 6:05 PM

LOL, exactly Laura! Couldn't have anything to do with your incredibly unprofessional behavior all summer, could it? Naah...it's that old bias-against-elite-schools problem again. It's just really unfair how much harder it is for an elite graduate to get a job when the rest of us schmoes get offers just for showing up!

Posted by: LizaBean | August 29, 2007 6:06 PM

Kind of makes it the equivalent of a CSS eh?
How about we do away the prestige of a school based on it's name and simply attach a number to the diploma.


Mehitabel - a $100,000 graduate
KLB_SS_MD, a -$10,000 graduate

Posted by: KLB_SS_MD | August 29, 2007 6:08 PM

"Mehitabel - a $100,000 graduate"

Lucky thing I'm not drinking any beverages right this moment, as they'd be sprayed all over my keyboard and computer screen right now.

Try Mehitabel - a $5,000 graduate

Posted by: mehitabel | August 29, 2007 6:11 PM

Notice KLB is in the negative numbers - maybe it should specify scholarship, GI bill, student loan.

Posted by: KLB_SS_MD | August 29, 2007 6:13 PM

KLB, Those wealthy Haahhhvaahhhd types had to sacrifice a tax cut so you could freeload in school with taxpayers footing your tuition bill. *spank* *spank*

Posted by: mehitabel | August 29, 2007 6:17 PM

So sorry. Many apologies.

Posted by: KLB_SS_MD | August 29, 2007 6:19 PM

That's right. One should derive personal profit in the private sector.

Posted by: mehitabel | August 29, 2007 6:24 PM

That's right. One should derive personal profit in the private sector.

(Sarcasm, in case anyone logs on late and wonders). I'm outta here!

Posted by: mehitabel | August 29, 2007 6:27 PM

How do you get a Harvard grad off your porch?

You pay him for the pizza.

Posted by: _Miles | August 29, 2007 6:40 PM

As of 6:37 pm CDT, our house is FULLY functional. The first time in 2 years, this very date.

I AM SO HAPPY!

Posted by: Fred | August 29, 2007 7:50 PM

Congratulations to Frieda and Fred on slaying the Katrina monster!!!

Posted by: mehitabel | August 29, 2007 8:01 PM

Fred and Frieda,
I'm so happy you are able to enjoy your now-functional home. I can't imagine what you went through in the last two years. Happy house again!

Posted by: dotted_1 | August 29, 2007 9:59 PM

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 

© 2007 The Washington Post Company