CEO vs. Parent I.Q.

Finally, a simple answer to my most burning question (not): Should I be a CEO or a gazillionaire entrepreneur? The University of Chicago business school has ranked the top traits for excellent CEO performance vs. entrepreneurs, according to the recent Are You CEO Material? in the Wall Street Journal. Take the test yourself:

Group A (CEOs)

Persistence

Attention to detail

Efficiency

Analytical skills

Setting High Standards


Group B (Entrepreneurs)


Strong oral communication

Teamwork

Flexibility/adaptability

Enthusiasm

Listening skills

Now I know why I'm neither the next Bill Gates nor the next Jack Welch: I have a few but not all of either group's traits. But in addition to being an interesting aptitude test, this research got me thinking about another list: good parenting traits. Here are my top qualities for excellent, balanced parenting (and like the other groups, I've got a few, but not all of these critical success factors in my toolkit). Wish there was a school that could teach them!


Group P (Parents)


Patience

Ability to survive without sleeping more than four hours a night uninterrupted for years on end

Enduring sense of humor

Inner peace

Stability -- Economic and Mental

Empathy

Pretzel-like adaptability and willingness to make sacrifices

Desire to be a parent

Innate respect for children of all ages and personalities

Do you know anyone with all of these qualities? What are your most critical parenting traits?

By Leslie Morgan Steiner |  December 10, 2007; 7:00 AM ET  | Category:  Conflicts
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Premier!

Have them all? Certainly not.

Have many of them? Yes.

Repeat: My life is not perfect. My life has never been perfect and will never be perfect. But my life is pretty darned good; my kids are great and I'm just going to keep doing my best.

Posted by: m2j5c2 | December 10, 2007 7:27 AM

I am not in posession of all of those traits either. I think one of the most critical traiits is discipline - not disciplining your kids, but self discipline. The self discipline that it requires to do the right thing when every cell in your body is saying "just say yes so we...don't have to argue again, can go to sleep, don't upset anyone etc...)." I have found that when I'm disciplined, I'm able to be the kind of parent that I want to be.

Posted by: moxiemom1 | December 10, 2007 7:34 AM

Moxie Mom -- Agreed! You are absolutely right. But so hard to be self-disciplined 24 hours a day. Easier when you have a supportive employer, helpful, rational spouse and have gotten a good night's sleep. Also far easier with just one child...Another mom once said to me that she didn't grow up until she had kids (in her case, when she was 42). Same kind of thing -- what you're talking about is a kind of maturity.

Posted by: leslie4 | December 10, 2007 7:38 AM

Wait -- let's talk about this no sleep "for years on end" business. Don't kids start sleeping through the night eventually? Heck, my two-year-old is a horrible sleeper, but I still average at least five hours a night (even if they're not usually consecutive). What's keeping the parents of older kids up all night?

Posted by: newsahm | December 10, 2007 8:02 AM

But then if you've really reached that point where "when every cell in your body is saying 'just say yes so we...don't have to argue again, can go to sleep, don't upset anyone' etc..." a little self indulgence means achieving (temporary) balance. Providing you manage discipline yourself at less extreme times...

Posted by: portuguese-mother | December 10, 2007 8:06 AM

I have seen ONE set of parents with all these traits and, frankly, it was a little freaky. (not sure if html works in a comment post--if not, sorry--cut and paste starting with www...)

This woman seemed to have a constant level of valium coursing through her system--that's how laid back and loving every single second of being a parent she was. She homeschools all of those kids and pretty much spends every waking minute with them, and, at least from the looks of it, never loses patience or craves time to herself. Of course appearances are deceiving, but how else could someone go on to have 17 kids if they weren't uber Stepford mom?

I have to say, though, that when I asked my kids, who were watching the show with me, whether they wished I was more like that lady--namely, patient and home 24/7--my daughter said NO--look how horrible her hair looks!

Posted by: maggielmcg | December 10, 2007 8:13 AM

Guess the html didn't work; the family is the Duggar family and their website is http://www.duggarfamily.com

Posted by: maggielmcg | December 10, 2007 8:14 AM

"Guess the html didn't work; the family is the Duggar family and their website is http://www.duggarfamily.com"

Strange. That html on my browser comes up as The Osbournes...

Posted by: chittybangbang | December 10, 2007 8:29 AM

NewSAHM - hopefully they do, but if you add another one you've reset the sleep clock. My son's 28 months and gets up about twice, but goes back down really quickly, at least.

I don't have all those qualities all of the time, and I'm not sure it would be necessary anyway. I have lost patience with my son and actually I think it's healthy - obviously to manage it appropriately and not start screaming or throwing things or hitting, but how else will he learn that people lose patience sometimes and how to negotiate that?

I think most parents do fine. When they don't, it is tragic, for sure. But I don't think we have to compare parents to "stars" in other industries. Sometimes it's enough to be the average Joe parent.

Posted by: shandra_lemarath | December 10, 2007 8:53 AM

Whew! Apparently I'm cut out to be an entrepreneur but not a parent, which pretty much confirms what I've been thinking all along.

Posted by: Meesh | December 10, 2007 8:55 AM

Ok, I'm with Leslie -- apparently, I'm not cut out to be either. :-)

I'd add a sense of perspective to the parenting list, along with reasonable expectations for the age of the kid(s). Everything is not A Crisis; some things are a bigger deal than others; and there are some things you just can't expect a kid who's X years old to manage.

Posted by: laura33 | December 10, 2007 8:57 AM

newmom: My daughter had a sleep disorder and she didn't start sleeping through the night consistently till late three. What eventually did it was going to full day preschool. It just depends on your kids. Some kids sleep through the night at 6 weeks old. Also for some parents 5 hours of sleep is not enough to carry out their day. I need about 7 hours to feel productive and well rested.

Posted by: foamgnome | December 10, 2007 9:04 AM

I am most of A and most of P. Almost none of E.

Posted by: foamgnome | December 10, 2007 9:06 AM

Amen to moxiemom on self-discipline and laura on sense of perspective! Rome wasn't built in a day and well-behaved child doesn't happen without some elbow grease...

Posted by: tntkate | December 10, 2007 9:08 AM

Meesh -- you completely cracked me up. I feel the same way -- I've got more ceo/entrepreneur traits than parenting. but obviously good parenting can't be captured with a list of any kind. desire to be a parent, some level of maturity, and love for your kids goes a long, long way. kids are adaptable and forgiving when there is a lot of love involved (unlike in the business world...)

Posted by: leslie4 | December 10, 2007 9:21 AM

Wait -- let's talk about this no sleep "for years on end" business. Don't kids start sleeping through the night eventually? Heck, my two-year-old is a horrible sleeper, but I still average at least five hours a night (even if they're not usually consecutive). What's keeping the parents of older kids up all night?

Posted by: newsahm | December 10, 2007 08:02 AM

1. Doing all of the things that can't get done, or aren't the priority, when the kids are awake. Cleaning, paying bills, catching up on work so you can leave early to get to that doctor's appointment. Sex.

2. If the kids are older than 16: the fact that they are driving, the behavior of the friends, their choices in significant others, waiting for them to come home, waiting for the phone to ring to tell me that Daniel's in jail or Megan's been in a car accident.

Posted by: gcoward | December 10, 2007 9:27 AM

"What's keeping the parents of older kids up all night?"

Waiting for them to get home from dates. Waiting for them to get home from school activities. Wondering how they're going to get into/get through college.

The knowledge that one of the neighbors' houses was raided by police last week and lots of people were cited for underage drinking. The knowledge that YOUR kids weren't at that party, but everybody your kids know WAS, so how do you know for a fact that your kids won't be at the next party?

Worrying about the fact that a girl you remember from 8-and-under softball is now a pregnant 17 year old. Worrying about the fact that the father is a 16-year old you remember from instructional soccer that your son used to be good friends with.

Shall I go on?

When our oldest kids were still toddlers, an older and wiser friend told us that the infant/toddler years were physically demanding, but the teen years were emotionally demanding and that was much, much worse than physically demanding. In a way, he was right - it's more demanding, but then again it's more fun and I still wouldn't trade this time for anything.

Posted by: ArmyBrat | December 10, 2007 10:09 AM

I have young kids and teenagers, and I agree with Army Brat completely.

However, I don't agree with the constant whining about not getting enough sleep, especially with Leslie's comment about not getting more than 4 hours of sleep at a time for years on end. Unless you are cosleeping with and breastfeeding your toddler at night, chances are you are going to be getting more than 4 hours of sleep at a time within the first year of your baby's life. And frankly, Leslie doesn't strike me as the breastfeeding a toddler/cosleeping type. So quitchyer exaggerating.

Posted by: fake99 | December 10, 2007 10:27 AM

"Unless you are cosleeping with and breastfeeding your toddler at night, chances are you are going to be getting more than 4 hours of sleep at a time within the first year of your baby's life."

I was a cosleeper/breastfeeder, and my baby slept through the night by six months. And when she was waking up, it was a lot easier to roll over and feed her than get up in the middle of the night, stumble into the kitchen, heat a bottle of formula, then bottle feed her, put her back down and hope she would go back to sleep so I could as well.

You guys are really scaring me about the teenager thing...I hope my daughter is as level-headed when she's 15 as she is at 11.

Posted by: pepperjade | December 10, 2007 10:47 AM

My mom always said that she hadn't slept through the night since she'd had her first child. And I have to agree...there is always something going on at night, especially with three kids, a dog and three cats. For a year with each child, it was breastfeeding. Then nightmares. Then bedwetting (kids, not me). Soon enough it will be waiting for the teenagers to come through the door. Seems that for some parents, me included, being a responsive/responsible parent precludes eight hours of uninterrupted sleep. I don't see any way around this, and I don't mean to complain because I WANT to be there for them, during the day and at night -- it's just reality, in our house, at least.

Posted by: leslie4 | December 10, 2007 10:50 AM

And Pepperjade, I agree that when you breastfeed and co-sleep, to whatever degree you do both, you get MORE, not less, sleep. And I'm not entirely sure I could have gotten up, warmed a bottle in the kitchen, fed the baby, and gotten back to sleep myself. Part of the beauty of breastfeeding is its simplicity for both mom and baby.

Posted by: leslie4 | December 10, 2007 10:52 AM

"Pretzel-like adaptability and willingness to make sacrifices"
This is so true, and not something you can really prepare yourself for. I think of all the traits Leslie mentioned flexibility has been the one I have had to work on the most as a new parent. For instance, pre-baby my idea of a nice evening at home was chicken curry with a glass of white whine, curling up with a book and a cup of tea, listening to NPR - but no more...Curry is too spicy to share with the baby, white wine makes me too tired to play with her, books are irresistible chew toys in a neverending game of keepaway, tea - easier to hold the baby safely with a big harmless glass of water. Only NPR has survived, and someday, I'm sure, will give way to the latest incarnation of Britney Spears. But, I'm in love, so it's okay, I'm learning to savor my simple stir-frys and the longer I stay with it the more I can see that my daughter's face is pretty much the most interesting reading I've ever done. And it's always nice to know that you can change, at whatever age, if there's a good enough reason to do so.

Posted by: pinkoleander | December 10, 2007 11:02 AM

"And Pepperjade, I agree that when you breastfeed and co-sleep, to whatever degree you do both, you get MORE, not less, sleep. "

In infancy, this is true. But those of us who breastfeed into toddlerhood and cosleep for several years are getting less sleep in those years than those of you who banish the baby to their crib and cut off the breastfeeding once the baby reaches a year (or younger, in most cases.)

And really, nightmares EVERY night? Bedwetting EVERY night? (in which case, have you heard of Goodnights?) Come on. And even with the teenagers....are you really going to let them stay out until the middle of the night, EVERY night?



Posted by: fake99 | December 10, 2007 11:06 AM

" But those of us who breastfeed into toddlerhood and cosleep for several years are getting less sleep in those years than those of you who banish the baby to their crib and cut off the breastfeeding once the baby reaches a year (or younger, in most cases.) "

Is that why you gals tend to be homely and shapeless-lack of sleep?

Posted by: chittybangbang | December 10, 2007 11:15 AM

And really, nightmares EVERY night? Bedwetting EVERY night? (in which case, have you heard of Goodnights?) Come on. And even with the teenagers....are you really going to let them stay out until the middle of the night, EVERY night?

Posted by: fake99 | December 10, 2007 11:06 AM


fake, you have a really, really big issue with the concept that many if not most parents are sleep-deprived for years.

Are you a single mom?

When do you work out?
When do you clean?

When are both parents together unchaperoned?
When do you sew the Halloween costumes?

When does the washer get fixed or the bathroom get tiled?
When do bills get paid?

When do you talk to good friends, sibling or parents on the phone?

Do you and your spouse shift work schedules so that one parent gets up at 4 and is out the door by 5, and the other parent goes to work late and comes home between 8 and 10 p.m.?

For many parents, family time after school, sports and whatever means that the only "free" time they have to exercise or do any of the other things listed above may be between 10 p.m. and 2 a.m. You've chosen differently. Goody for you. If you think everyone is going to bed and getting up on your schedule, think again.

Posted by: gcoward | December 10, 2007 11:17 AM

Agreed. If you are heartless or a tyrant or just insanely lucky, maybe you can get a full night's sleep on a regular basis. But I am none of these. And also, the truth is, I love to see my kids in the middle of the night. It is a special time together even if you are half asleep.

Posted by: leslie4 | December 10, 2007 11:22 AM

On average, I wake up around 3:00 in the morning. It's called "me" time.

Posted by: DandyLion | December 10, 2007 11:24 AM

"On average, I wake up around 3:00 in the morning. It's called "me" time."

Your wife would prefer you go back to sleep...

Posted by: chittybangbang | December 10, 2007 11:29 AM

Is that why you gals tend to be homely and shapeless-lack of sleep?

Posted by: chittybangbang | December 10, 2007 11:15 AM

Oh Chitty, there are some hot mamas out there. I got up at 5 a.m. and ran two miles every morning to shed the baby pounds. I was back to size 4...though these days I'm a size 6 (can't run anymore, I blew out my knee...).

But even at 42 and a size 6, I have a better body than a lot of women who are half my age. And I know several moms who are in great shape and look wonderful. Most of them have not gone under the knife ; )

Posted by: pepperjade | December 10, 2007 11:55 AM

pepperjade

"Oh Chitty, there are some hot mamas out there"

With the same mindset as fake???

Posted by: chittybangbang | December 10, 2007 12:01 PM

Yeah Chitty, my wife wants me to do my share to balance out the waterbed, and usually when I try to lay back down, there is a kid in my spot. Punks! I have to fight for every square inch in my own house.

Yesterday while I was trying to take a nap, I heard my youngest come bounding up the steps saying, "Giddyup horsey, pick up your feet." To me it was a warning that I was about to get jumped on. I think a good father nowadays has to be willing to get pounced on and otherwised literally walked all over by his kids!

Posted by: DandyLion | December 10, 2007 12:06 PM

pepperjade: "You guys are really scaring me about the teenager thing...I hope my daughter is as level-headed when she's 15 as she is at 11."

Yep, it helps if she's level-headed, but you'll also need to worry about her friends.

In all seriousness, with teens you're not worried about them EVERY single night, because on school nights they're home and in bed early. But there's just so much going on and it's hard to track all of it.

Re: Leslie's mother's comment about not sleeping through the night since having her first child: that's probably true. I think that as a parent you're more likely to pop awake in the middle of the night whenever there's an unusual "bump", just to check and make sure the kids are okay. Even if there's no sudden sound, there's a tendency to pop awake "just because" - probably the brain is working overtime. The smart parents learn to quickly go back to sleep, though.

Posted by: ArmyBrat | December 10, 2007 12:06 PM

DandyLion "I think a good father nowadays has to be willing to get pounced on and otherwised literally walked all over by his kids!"

It has always been thus! One of DW's favorite pictures is of me as the "horsie" with the oldest three - then 5, 3, and 2 - all on my back.

They tried to re-create the picture last year, but the "horsie" refused to go along with it.

Posted by: ArmyBrat | December 10, 2007 12:08 PM

Is that why you gals tend to be homely and shapeless-lack of sleep?

Posted by: chittybangbang | December 10, 2007 11:15 AM

No, I'm homely even when well rested. For some reason DDS are young knockouts -- must be all that breast milk I gave them.

Posted by: anne.saunders | December 10, 2007 12:27 PM

anne.saunders

"No, I'm homely even when well rested. For some reason DDS are young knockouts -- must be all that breast milk I gave them."

Do they have fake's martyr personality?

Posted by: chittybangbang | December 10, 2007 12:36 PM

fake99 said "than those of you who banish the baby to their crib and cut off the breastfeeding once the baby reaches a year (or younger, in most cases)."

Could you be any more biased/unbalanced? Of course, you accused me of making excuses about why I stopped breastfeeding, so I shouldn't be surprised. No arguing with followers of the One True Way.

Posted by: atb2 | December 10, 2007 12:37 PM

atb, I don't know why you can't understand that we don't love our babies as much as fake loves hers.

Posted by: gcoward | December 10, 2007 12:44 PM

ROTFL....yep, I'm unbalanced, even though I'm the one who is saying that I get enough sleep and am rested and happy, despite the fact that I have four children of varying ages (but I guess that's because I'm heartless, a tyrant, or lucky, according to Leslie. It's not because I'm unwilling to play the martyr and continually talk about how parenting is the hardest job in the world and demand recognition for it every second of the day.) But wait, according to chitty I AM a martyr, even though I'm not the one whining about how TOUGH it is to be a parent and how hard balance is to achieve and how little sleep I have.

Posted by: fake99 | December 10, 2007 12:47 PM

fake99

"But wait, according to chitty I AM a martyr, even though I'm not the one whining about how TOUGH it is to be a parent and how hard balance is to achieve and how little sleep I have. "

Either way, you who will probably meet the fate of most martyrs..

Posted by: chittybangbang | December 10, 2007 12:53 PM

"I was a cosleeper/breastfeeder, and my baby slept through the night by six months. And when she was waking up, it was a lot easier to roll over and feed her than get up in the middle of the night, stumble into the kitchen, heat a bottle of formula, then bottle feed her, put her back down and hope she would go back to sleep so I could as well."

Posted by: pepperjade | December 10, 2007 10:47 AM

We put each new baby into a Porta-Crib in our bedroom. If he got hungry and cried during the night, I would jump up, grab him, hand him to my wife to breast-feed, and go back to sleep. That way, my wife never had to get up until morning.

Posted by: MattInAberdeen | December 10, 2007 1:04 PM

The difference between a CEO and an entrepreneur is pretty simple: ceo's run things that entrepreneurs start. One is nuts and bolts; the other is ideas.

As for parenting, there's a combination of both. I guess that's where the balance comes in.

Posted by: gottabeanon | December 10, 2007 1:07 PM

"The difference between a CEO and an entrepreneur is pretty simple: ceo's run things that entrepreneurs start. One is nuts and bolts; the other is ideas. "

Kinda like the difference between wives & hookers...

Posted by: chittybangbang | December 10, 2007 1:16 PM

True, you're not complaining about lack of sleep, you're just judging people who don't breastfeed into the toddler years or cosleep. That lack of flexibility or acceptance of others' choices or circumstances is pretty unbalanced.

Posted by: atb2 | December 10, 2007 2:06 PM

"True, you're not complaining about lack of sleep, you're just judging people who don't breastfeed into the toddler years or cosleep."

What is "cosleep"? It sounds ghetto. Good combo with the Nursing Nazi rant.

Posted by: chittybangbang | December 10, 2007 2:10 PM

Entrepreneurs are very nuts and bolts -- in addition to having ideas and visions, they are intensely focused on creation and fast growth. Good CEOs tend to be about relationships, morale, employee structures, the good parts of bureaucracy. Kind of like some parents are good with babies, others are good with teenagers...But we parents can't just hand our kids off -- we've got to try to be good at it all, which is why I'm so tired all the time...

Back to the sleep topic: it's time for my afternoon nap.

Posted by: leslie4 | December 10, 2007 2:12 PM

Breastfeeding/cosleeping: Burn fat while you sleep! I'd say it's one of the best ways for a mom to drop a few hundred calories a day.

Posted by: DandyLion | December 10, 2007 2:15 PM

"But we parents can't just hand our kids off -- we've got to try to be good at it all, which is why I'm so tired all the time..."

LOL! You don't hand your kids off when you send them to daycare or leave them with a nanny?

atb - I'm not judging people who don't breastfeed into the toddler years or who don't co-sleep. I'm saying that generally speaking people who don't have a 3 year old kicking them in the back all night long get a better night's sleep than someone who does. And that if you don't wake up to nurse a 2 year old in the middle of the night, you're likely to sleep more than someone who does. You're bringing an old discussion into this and being HIGHLY sensitive. If you're happy with your parenting decisions, then just be happy and don't get so defensive.

Posted by: fake99 | December 10, 2007 2:17 PM

Then I suggest you be careful with using terms like "banish." Tell me that wasn't intended to be judgemental so I can laugh at you.

Posted by: atb2 | December 10, 2007 2:41 PM

People who practice "crying it out" with their children and who require a child who wants to sleep with them to sleep in their own bed ARE banishing them. If that's judging in your eyes, fine, I'm judging.

That being said, I suggest that YOU worry about why you're so bitter and unhappy than you need to laugh at people to make yourself feel good instead of worrying about what I think.

Posted by: fake99 | December 10, 2007 2:46 PM

O ladies, can we not all get along? Every mother, surely she loves her babies.

Posted by: abu_ibrahim | December 10, 2007 3:14 PM

Catfight! Yoohoo Leslie, wake up!

Posted by: DandyLion | December 10, 2007 3:19 PM

«Patience
Ability to survive without sleeping more than four hours a night uninterrupted for years on end
Enduring sense of humor
Inner peace
Stability -- Economic and Mental
Empathy
Pretzel-like adaptability and willingness to make sacrifices
Desire to be a parent
Innate respect for children of all ages and personalities»

«Leslie Morgan Steiner | December 10, 2007; 7:00 AM ET»

O Leslie, parents also need these --

Strength
Health
Aptitude
Zeal
Ox, power of
Ox, power of another
Money.

First letters, they spell SHAZOOM.

Posted by: abu_ibrahim | December 10, 2007 3:20 PM

Great, then we agree that you're judgemental. Now I'll go reflect on my bitterness and unhappiness. Thank goodness you were here to point out the problems in my life. BWWWAAAHHHAHHHHAHH.

Posted by: atb2 | December 10, 2007 3:29 PM

"People who practice "crying it out" with their children and who require a child who wants to sleep with them to sleep in their own bed ARE banishing them. If that's judging in your eyes, fine, I'm judging."

I wonder whether this one is willing to banish her precious progeny to his own seat on a plane when all he wants to do is run around and scream during take-off. tsk. tsk.

Posted by: gcoward | December 10, 2007 3:43 PM

Wow, didn't meant to ignite a s**tstorm with my comment. I just figured things would be improving from here on out, sleep-wise.

(fwiw, I was terrible at co-sleeping. If DD was in bed, I was never able to sleep. For me, it was far easier to get up and nurse during the night than deal with Sprawly McBedhog in my bed.)

Posted by: newsahm | December 10, 2007 3:47 PM

newsahm

How did you deal with leaky diapers and your bed turning into a mini-landfill for human waste?

Posted by: chittybangbang | December 10, 2007 3:50 PM

I think it's safe to say that neither CEOs nor entrepreneurs would be arguing about such silly things. Maybe that's why most are men.

Posted by: gottabeanon | December 10, 2007 4:03 PM

Yeesh, if teaching my kids to sleep in their own beds means that I get more un-interrupted sleep I believe I am a better mother for it in the long run. Then again if you think that keeping your kids in bed with you but getting less sleep makes you a better mother more power to you.

It really is 6 of one and a half dozen of another if you think about it. It is about what provides personal balance to you and your family.

Fake, it may be the tone more than anything else in your comments. Some of the wording seems a bit harsh.

Posted by: atlindc | December 10, 2007 4:05 PM

atlindc - seems like a whole lot of 'harsh' went on today.....

While ArmyBrat is correct about the worry part of teens, my parents say it is part of the circle of life. The more you worried your parents, the more your kids will worry you.

But then, I'm with Meesh...don't worry and keep that bar low. That way I can say I'm both the CEO/Entrepreneur and mean it (in some fashion)

Posted by: dotted_1 | December 10, 2007 5:00 PM

I think it's safe to say that neither CEOs nor entrepreneurs would be arguing about such silly things. Maybe that's why most are men.

Posted by: gottabeanon | December 10, 2007 04:03 PM

Thank God, someone else around here who believes that the earth is flat and babies are delivered by storks. I needed some company.

Posted by: gcoward | December 10, 2007 6:06 PM

"Fake, it may be the tone more than anything else in your comments. Some of the wording seems a bit harsh. "

What do you mean "it may be the tone more than anything else"? Was I wondering what was wrong with my posts? Did I start crying and say "people are misunderstanding me!!" Did I ask "why are you all so mean!!???" No, I didn't. I'm just posting what I think. Others are welcome to post back what they think. But thanks for the evaluation.


Posted by: fake99 | December 10, 2007 6:51 PM

Good post Leslie. Certainly, for me patience tops the list. that's why i had to change my line of work after the kids - whatever patience I have had to be reserved for them:).

And whoever's on the sleep issue - I've been sleep-deprived ever since the kids. I wake up at five to work out, and stay up past midnight to write. Not complaining, but if you want to do anything else apart from work and childcare, you have to sacrifice something.

Posted by: priyagayatri | December 11, 2007 6:36 AM

Good post Leslie. Certainly, for me patience tops the list. that's why i had to change my line of work after the kids - whatever patience I have had to be reserved for them:).

And whoever's on the sleep issue - I've been sleep-deprived ever since the kids. I wake up at five to work out, and stay up past midnight to write. Not complaining, but if you want to do anything else apart from work and childcare, you have to sacrifice something.

Posted by: priyagayatri | December 11, 2007 6:36 AM

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