Sex & The City Reviews

Did you notice, starting Friday night, that women about town were dressed in brighter colors, with a little more spring in their high heels? One of the uniquely wonderful success factors in Sex & the City, which opened nationwide on Friday, is its ability to make women feel fabulous about being insecure, vulnerable, sexual, complicated, and shoe-obsessed. Here are my thoughts, mixed in with a representative sample from other On Balance posters:

"It was fabulous. Yes, parts were predictable. And, yes, the girls seemed more fashion-obsessed than normal. But I just missed them. I loved seeing Carrie tell Big off. I loved Miranda showing vulnerability through her anger. The girls supported each other as they always do. Samantha did something with sushi I'd love to try. And I nearly wet my pants when Charlotte "Poughkeepsied" in hers. For fans of the series like me, watching the movie was like hanging out with my girlfriends."

My theory for why the six-season HBO show and movie resonate with so many women is that each of the four main characters represents a piece of the puzzle of modern American womanhood. There's Charlotte, the traditional wife-and-mother in all of us, who learned early on that tall, dark and handsome doesn't count for much in a husband or in longterm happiness. And Samantha, who wants hot sex and financial independence on her own terms -- sounds pretty good, if we all had her chutzpah. Miranda, the sensible, hard-working, always-there friend, a career mom bearing the weight of being the primary breadwinner, along with being a good mother and loving wife to a man she changed her life to create a family with. And Carrie, the neon pink heart of the show, whose life is checkered with bad choices and worse luck in love, who brings all the other "selves" together to eat, drink, shop, and scramble onto the subway in pajamas at midnight during a snowstorm to support each other in life's crises.

"I am a 30 year old, married mother of two, ages 4 and 5 months, who works full-time and lives in the Boston area. My best friend and I purchased tickets about a week ago. We both expected it to be an okay movie, but nothing great. We were pleasantly surprised. Despite the series being gone for so long now, it was easy to fall right back into the rhythm of SATC. I've always had an affinity for Miranda, and enjoyed her plot line very much. Charlotte had some great lines (though I don't appreciate potty humor, and was a bit sad that they brought that in). The movie was indeed long, but I felt it was necessary to show that happy endings can take their time in coming to you."

I laughed, cried and drooled my way through the two-plus movie. I loved every second. There were a few slow moments, including a trip to Mexico that could probably be cut, but otherwise, I wouldn't change a thing. The ridiculously gorgeous clothes and shoes, the snappy dialogue, the steady stream of issues that nearly every woman struggles to make sense of in life: yearning for children, balancing work and family, hoping for Prince Charming, realizing he's never coming, turning 50, trying to be smart about work and financial independence, confronting infidelity, fearing loneliness, finding forgiveness, appreciating the power of female friendship, getting a belly roll, figuring out when to say yes (and no) to sex and love. It's all wrapped up in one movie, with the backdrop of ridiculously lovely hairstyles, expensive clothes and daily makeup assistance unavailable to 99.9% of us real women. But who cares?

"The movie should have been rated 'U'. You need a uterus to watch it!"

And you? Did you love it? Hate it? Did you skip opening weekend? Why or why not? What does Sex & The City evoke in you?


Thanks to Gina, Syracuse, NY; Cheryl, Newton Highlands, Mass.; and Fred, New Orleans, for contributing such great quotes.

By Leslie Morgan Steiner |  June 2, 2008; 7:00 AM ET  | Category:  Top Ten Tips
Previous: Can You Find Balance in a Flip-Flop? | Next: The U.S.: A Balance Laggard, No Matter How You Cut It


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Gee, let me guess which quote Fred contributed. . . . :-)

Posted by: Laura | June 2, 2008 8:18 AM

:)

Haven't seen it, would like to. Hoping that I can take an evening to myself and just go. Couldn't this past weekend, but hopefully in the next week or two.

But it does look fabulous. I only got hooked on the show cause we ended up getting HBO for free for a while - then I didn't watch, then I caught the episodes on TBS - which weren't edited much when they were first run (like now). It's definitely a fun show - and quite fictional, given how those women live and the realities of the cost of living in new york. But it's fun to dream...

Posted by: atlmom | June 2, 2008 8:30 AM

Unfortunately I had to see Baby Mama for the second time instead of SATC because my date was my 12 year-old daughter. Not only because of the "graphic nudity," but because she would have made fun of me crying (because I know I will). I'm hoping to go see it tomorrow night when my husband has baseball. A few friends' husbands went with them--willingly--but I'm figuring it's definitely rated U!

Posted by: Anonymous | June 2, 2008 8:46 AM

Didn't see it, won't see it. I'd rather see "Indiana Jones" or "Prince Caspian". I wear Danskos and Tevas, girls. Not the SATC type. Guess I need a makeover. Clearly!

Posted by: WorkingMomX | June 2, 2008 8:48 AM

I went with a friend this weekend. We were both casual fans of the show, but definitely not fanatics. I thought it was fun, funny, interesting, and about 45 minutes too long.

One thing I realized is how far I (and my friend) have drifted from the core demographic for this movie, and how that affected how we saw the movie. The showing we saw was sold out, and full to the brim with 20-something women dressed to the nines (many of them must have been in their teens when this show was first aired). And there we were, the two SAHMs in t-shirts and capris. At one point, there was a scene with a "newborn baby." The kid weighed at least 15 pounds, and had sideburns. My friend and I burst out laughing, but we appeared to be the only two people in the entire theater who thought it was funny. It was also amusing that neither of the two children in the movie appeared to be capable of speaking in sentences, even though they were 3 and 5 years old.

Posted by: NewSAHM | June 2, 2008 9:40 AM

Who Cares? -- I'm asking all my friends and colleagues what they thought of the movie, in the same way I'm curious about what their kids are doing this summer, what they think of Hillary and Barack, and how they feel about a Celtics/LA reunion.

So yes, I'm curious what all my friends on this blog think about the movie, because I respect your thoughts and reactions.

I also am curious why you don't care. So tell us. And tell us what you'd rather talk about, if this doesn't float your boat.

Posted by: Leslie | June 2, 2008 10:31 AM

I'm going to wait until it comes onto HBO. I'll watch it at home on HD. I figure it will have a run on HBO before DVD release. Why pay $$$ for uncomfortable seats? Besides, as it is soft porn, I'd rather not watch it in public.

Posted by: dotted | June 2, 2008 10:39 AM

Who cares? - Like Leslie said, there are many balance issues portrayed by the women in SATC. Fashion aside, they deal with infidelity, moving for someone else's career, children, I'm sure there is more...

Posted by: dotted | June 2, 2008 10:42 AM

Yawn. Its opening evoked a giant YAWN.

Posted by: Ryan | June 2, 2008 10:45 AM

I didn't see it and probably won't, unless it's on Lifetime or USA network one day. I can't really relate to this show. 55 million is very respectable, but doesn't approach the openings of Indy or Ironman. I think fewer women relate to this show than Leslie and many posters assume. While there may be universal themes, it's hard to feel solidarity with 40/50 year old women with ample free time and unlimited finances in NYC. It's also unfortunate the show was so white-bread. Some diversity could have gone a long way towards making it more universally appealing.

Posted by: FloridaChick | June 2, 2008 10:59 AM

You went to see it?

Posted by: to ryan | June 2, 2008 11:04 AM

FC -- I agree totally that not everyone can "identify" with these women, their wardrobes and their lives!

BUT the issues they are grappling with are more universal than their LA/Manhattan lives.

Issues like: infidelity, infertility, financial independence, the exhaustion and frustrations of fulltime working motherhood, relationship compromises, the ability to soldier on after repeated heartbreak...and how a nice pair of shoes, whether they are from Manolo or Payless, can make your day.

Some good stats from the NYT this morning:

--opening weekend brought in $55.7 million
-- strongest opening ever for a movied carried by a female lead
--85% of ticket buyers were women

All this bodes well for more movies reflecting issues that are important to women.

Posted by: Leslie | June 2, 2008 11:08 AM

You already wasted one day on this. Do we really need another?

Posted by: Who cares? | June 2, 2008 11:24 AM

"but there is something about realizing you can't watch something when you really want to because there is someone in the house who shouldn't be exposed to it (whether sex or violence or subject matter)."

Hmmm, I hadn't thought about it before, but I guess there's a good long stretch where the kids aren't going to bed early enough that you can watch all this stuff after they're tucked away, but they're too young for you to watch when they're up and about. That stinks!

We've been so excited to be able to watch movies in the evenings since my son finally settled into a consistently early bedtime, I guess we better enjoy all the crazy, racy and violent stuff we can, LOL.

Posted by: LizaBean | June 2, 2008 11:32 AM

Sorry everyone, for the time-stamp problems. We must be having tech problems, which hopefully will get fixed soon!

Posted by: Leslie | June 2, 2008 11:40 AM

Dotted - I have to say, there was a lot of sex in the movie, more than I remember in the show. Some of it is sexy and some is hilarious. So maybe you should enjoy it at home...

Posted by: Leslie | June 2, 2008 11:42 AM

I always thought the series was stupid. These silly, vapid females were not people I'd have wanted to spend even 10 minutes with.

Could never understand the appeal.

Posted by: magpie | June 2, 2008 11:43 AM

You already wasted one day on this. Do we really need another?

Posted by: Who cares? | June 2, 2008 11:24 AM

======================================
You obviously do if you bothered to comment and this goes for the rest of you "Who Cares?"

Posted by: I do | June 2, 2008 11:44 AM

I'll rent it. I'm looking forward to it.

I would say the appeal isn't so much that we see ourselves as any of the characters, but that the friendship is so enviable.

Posted by: atb | June 2, 2008 11:45 AM

It is funny to read responses to posts in the incorrect order!

Sex memories may be dependent on age. Not that we become conservative as we age, but there is something about realizing you can't watch something when you really want to because there is someone in the house who shouldn't be exposed to it (whether sex or violence or subject matter). Case in point: Kill Bill- I love that movie, but I couldn't watch it with kids in the house.

Posted by: dotted | June 2, 2008 11:46 AM

My young adult daughter is a huge fan of the show. She has all the seasons on DVD. She wanted me to watch a few episodes with her to share her enthusiasm. But she fast forwarded though all sex scenes. She said it would embarrass her to watch sex scenes with her dad.

Posted by: Not saying who I am (but you could probably guess) | June 2, 2008 11:46 AM

I confess, I intended to see it Saturday morning, then Sunday morning, and now I'm trying for next weekend. Isn't it odd that I'm having to balance my life with seeing a movie about balancing life? Let me lob a bomb into the discussion: does the lack of interest from the men point up their lack of interest in women's fashions, or their lack of interest in how to balance work, life, and family?

Posted by: babsy1 | June 2, 2008 11:47 AM

LizaBean: it is a good long stretch. Depending on your child, it could be into well into their teens. We watched all the Indiana Jones movies a couple of weeks ago, in order. It was the first time they had seen IJ #2! I was shocked. I didn't allow them to watch it when they were younger. something about eating monkey brains, tearing hearts out: just isn't kid fare! Anyways, they'd never watched it. Now they want to know what was the big deal...sigh. It was a major bummer when their bedtime naturally shifted back past 8pm. Now I'm nagging them to go to bed at 10 and 11pm!! But they're teenagers...argh!

Posted by: dotted | June 2, 2008 11:47 AM

I got to see a prescreening last Tuesday, I have to agree with most comments I've seen, it was better than expected, though longer than it should have been. I just wish the guys were seen more. Poor Stanford I don't think had any lines.

Posted by: Anonymous | June 2, 2008 11:48 AM

I saw it, though not on opening night. I thought it was better than expected, though I never really watched the show when it was on. I caught it via Netflix. Had to laugh when all of the women in the audience sighed more over the closet than the ending. It just reminded me that what was more important than the shoes and the men were the relationships the women had. It made me miss my college friends - not because we were Samantha or Carrie, but because I went to Bryn Mawr, and we all had a very close relationship and still support each other through each marriage and baby.

Posted by: canary28 | June 2, 2008 11:53 AM

All this bodes well for more movies reflecting issues that are important to women."

Like how to constantly masturbate like samantha? Gee, big balance issues. Only a nitwit like Leslie would see this as a balance show.

Posted by: yawn x 2 | June 2, 2008 12:54 PM

One thing I forgot to mention -- I really liked how the movie acknowledged the fact that Carrie & Co. are no longer 20-something, and how their lives and reactions have changed with age. I also liked the themes of Samantha's story(adjusting to monogamy, maintaining a sense of self while in a relationship). I thought both issues were handled very nicely.

Posted by: NewSAHM | June 2, 2008 12:56 PM

LOL, dotted, I remember the same thing with The Witches of Eastwick. My mom wouldn't let me watch it, although one of my friends got to, and it just became this long-running thing in my family. When I finally saw it it was so anti-climactic. But I still tease my mom sometimes about not letting me watch it.

On another note, we also did the Indiana Jones trilogy and I had forgotten what a bad movie the second one was - we turned it off part way through just because it sucked! I really want to like the new one, I hope it's not an even/odd thing, LOL.

Posted by: LizaBean | June 2, 2008 12:57 PM

In the real world, Samantha would have an std or aids, Miranda would be a lesbian man hating career lawyer,Carrie would be a single over the hill woman with too many hookups under her belt and Charlotte would be a divorce' desperately trying to catch a man at the country club before her looks fade.

Posted by: get real people | June 2, 2008 1:09 PM

To all the naysayers out there who like to add random obnoxious comments like "this topic is stupid," there's a little button in your browser labeled "Back." Use it. The rest of us are enjoying the conversation, so if you don't have anything to add, don't ruin it for the rest of us. Reading the blog is a choice, not something you have to suffer through if you don't like it.

Leslie and guest posters:
I really enjoy this blog. I like what you write, I like the comments, and I hope you have as much fun writing the blog as I have reading it. Thanks!

Posted by: if you don't like the topic, don't read | June 2, 2008 1:26 PM

This topic is stupid.

The Flip Flop one was better. Not by much but better.

Posted by: Yesterday | June 2, 2008 1:40 PM

To "If":

I don't think the topic is any stupider than the actual show itself.

Is this blog only for those who agree with the majority?

Unfortunately, there's no handy button on your browser that says "Turn off sanctimony."

Posted by: magpie | June 2, 2008 1:42 PM

I loved the movie. It was interesting how now that I'm a working, married mom, I relate most to the characters of Charlotte and Miranda, but when I was a single (when the show was on), I related more to Carrie. The movie made me realize how times have changed for me.

Posted by: DC Lawyer | June 2, 2008 1:51 PM

Leslie and others:

Since you asked... I don't always care about the topic of the day and I frequently skip it or don't bother commenting. But, in general, I am interested in the discussion so I do come by daily. I read about things that have never been an issue for me. I read about things that may be an issue in the future. I read about things that are right on target for what I'm dealing with right now. But I do prefer to read about real things in this forum, real people, real issues. I have no intention of watching the movie. Only caught a few clips of the show when it was on and they didn't exactly draw me in. I just don't get why anyone wants to keep analysing the so-called balance issues in the screwed up lives of fictional characters. Especially multiple times. Especially when it's not even a light Friday topic. So I guess my suggestion relating to future topics is just to keep it real.

Posted by: Who Cares? | June 2, 2008 2:02 PM

Hear, hear! Who Cares? is absolutely right on this. Keep the topics to real people instead of asking which idiot character out of some piece of fictional nonsense we most identify with.

Posted by: Anonymous | June 2, 2008 2:08 PM

Thanks Dotted -- I guess there always is a silver lining. The scramble of posts is pretty funny.

ATB -- The friendship is enviable. But I have to say, my female (and even a few male) friendships feel the same way.

I went to the movie with the woman who has been one of my best friends since I was 13. I cried when Carrie took the subway in her pjs to Miranda's on New Year's Eve, because my friend and I have done crazy stuff like that for each other, many times over the past 30 years.

Do you have friendships like this too?

Posted by: Leslie | June 2, 2008 2:09 PM

@Get Real People: Sweetie, you're projecting again. Not all women with vigorous sex lives have STDs or AIDS, not all career women are lesbians, and not all marriages end in divorce. The movie (which I have yet to see) appears to be about balancing yearning and reality...Is there anything wrong with that?

Posted by: babsy1 | June 2, 2008 2:09 PM

I'm a roamer, having moved almost every 2 years, but I have friendships that mean as much to me as the characters in the movie. Last year while my best friend and I were on our annual baseball trip, her mother died after a long time in a coma. I wanted to cancel (it happened the first night), but she wanted to continue. The death was expected, the arrangements had been made, and her husband was in favor of the trip. We had a lovely time, talked about our mothers and our mixed feelings towards them, and enjoyed it immensely. It was the best way to come to terms with all those feelings.

Posted by: babsy1 | June 2, 2008 2:15 PM

I think the ways women are portrayed in the media can have a lot to do with the balance that we find in our real lives.

To me, it's empowering to see a woman who likes sex and financial independence (Samantha) who is more than one-dimensional. I like seeing Miranda struggle with being too exhausted by her fulltime career and motherhood to have sex as often as her husband likes. Part of me lies with Charlotte who blithely abandons her work to be home (very happily) with her children. And a whole lot of me identifies with Carrie, writing about her life, struggling with the myths and realities of love, and keeping the four friends connected.

Seeing their struggles, even against a glam backdrop that bears no resemblance to my life, gives me a whole lot more ammunition to fight my battles with balance than something ridiculous like Pretty Woman, a pathetically male portrayal of a working woman, or most tv shows that make women's issues into cartoon sitcoms -- if they even address them at all.

Posted by: Leslie | June 2, 2008 2:21 PM

So, for an entirely different perspective on balance and life in the movies, we watched a documentary last night called "The King of Kong: A Fistful of Quarters," which follows one guy's attempt to defeat the world-record holder for top score on Donkey Kong. It's a surprisingly compelling film, and the portrayal of the challenger and his family (and some pretty amusing parenting vs. donkey kong moments) is fun. It also features words of wisdom from the challenger's daughter, who questions the drive to be in the Guiness Book of World Records, and notes that a lot of people ruin their lives trying to get into it. Just for those who are not finding SATC to be so compelling :)

Posted by: LizaBean | June 2, 2008 2:44 PM

"Seeing their struggles, even against a glam backdrop that bears no resemblance to my life, gives me a whole lot more ammunition to fight my battles with balance..."

How so?

Posted by: Who Cares? | June 2, 2008 2:45 PM

"Pretty Woman, a pathetically male portrayal of a working woman"

"working" in one particular sense of the word.

I honestly hope that the "working moms" on this blog aren't "working" in that way.

:-) :-)

Posted by: Anonymous | June 2, 2008 3:05 PM

Since my name has been mentioned here twice and some people's opininon is that only real people, real life serious stuff should be discussed here (not necessarily my opinion, btw), I will give you the Frieda update.

She is doing as expected, only 2 chemo treatments to go. She decided not to wear a wig at all. If you need serious today, you can read (or reread) her guest blog.

http://blog.washingtonpost.com/onbalance/2008/04/breast_cancer_survivor.html


Also, have y'all seen Robin Roberts recently? Her hair is growing back. (She did have a beautiful wig for a while!) She is a beautiful person, I have met her on occasion. As well as her sister Sally Ann Roberts who is a news reporter on a New Orleans station.

Posted by: Fred | June 2, 2008 3:12 PM

Ok, Leslie. Whom do you identify with in "Desperate Housewives"?

That show is about as realistic as SATC, but it IS about women trying to find some sort of balance, right?

Posted by: Anonymous | June 2, 2008 3:13 PM

Also, I always like playing Donkey Kong!

Posted by: Fred | June 2, 2008 3:14 PM

"Not all women with vigorous sex lives have STDs or AIDS, not all career women are lesbians, and not all marriages end in divorce."

And not all career women who are lesbians are unhappily single--some of us have very happy relationships and families. Did you intend to phrase this as though being lesbian is a downside equivalent to having a chronic disease?

I'll probably see the movie sometime when it's out on DVD and my sister-in-law is visiting. She's a big SATC fan, and I've found the episodes I've seen mildly amusing.

Posted by: The other 5% | June 2, 2008 3:15 PM

ALL marriages end in either divorce or death.

Posted by: Anonymous | June 2, 2008 3:17 PM

The Other 5% - I meant no disrespect, and no equivalence between the two. I was only responding point by point to Who Cares. If you move to California, you can be married out here...

Posted by: babsy1 | June 2, 2008 3:22 PM

The other 5%, you must have missed the post babsy was responding to. I don't think she was linking the two at all, but responding to three separate assertions made by some troll.

Posted by: Anonymous | June 2, 2008 3:24 PM

All marriages end in divorce or death: hmmm, sounds like a reason to avoid the institution. Of course, all life ends in death as well. I think this means I need to buy some shoes to stave off mortality.

Posted by: babsy1 | June 2, 2008 3:25 PM

@Who Cares: Pretty Woman is about the male fantasy of the MAN WHO SAVES US if only we will prostitute ourselves to him. SATC is a fantasy, but it still addresses real issues. We're women who want to know that others struggle with the same dilemmas, the same lives, the same partners. We're women who want to know that we are not alone. And sometimes we want to drool over the shoes and bags we would never buy because we have a grocery budget.

Posted by: babsy1 | June 2, 2008 3:28 PM

I liked the movie, like I liked the show.

To me the most touching scene was where Samantha feeds Carrie the yoghurt. I think that sums it up for me. Four deeply flawed but loving women, supporting each other. Works for me.

People can argue all they like that the women don't represent them - and they don't totally represent me either. So?

Posted by: Shandra | June 2, 2008 3:35 PM

"Also, have y'all seen Robin Roberts recently?"

Fred, I went to college with Robin Roberts. Had an American History class with her. I remember her as tall (5'10"), smart, one heck of a basketball player (over 1,000 points and 1,000 rebounds in her career) and oh yeah, pretty attractive too.

babsy: "does the lack of interest from the men point up their lack of interest in women's fashions, or their lack of interest in how to balance work, life, and family?"

In my case, lack of interest in the use of fashion - clothes and shoes - as metaphors for solutions to life's problems. "Balancing" I can relate to; the other stuff not so much.

(Haven't seen the movie, don't intend to; rarely saw the TV show - we don't get HBO at home - and wasn't particularly interested when I did stumble across it while channel-surfing in hotel rooms.)


Posted by: ArmyBrat | June 2, 2008 3:36 PM

Leslie- I love love love my friends, but it's still my mom and sister I fall back on. Though for my one great friend who doesn't have a mom or sister to fall back on, I'm who she falls back on, and I'm happy and grateful to be there.

Posted by: atb | June 2, 2008 3:39 PM

babsy: "does the lack of interest from the men point up their lack of interest in women's fashions, or their lack of interest in how to balance work, life, and family?"

AB: In my case, lack of interest in the use of fashion - clothes and shoes - as metaphors for solutions to life's problems. "Balancing" I can relate to; the other stuff not so much.

That's the way I feel about it. I don't care about fashion, so a movie that uses fashion as the means to talk about balancing what we must do with what we would like to do (which is what this sounds like to me, based on what little of SATC I've seen) leaves me cold. Make it a movie about balancing adventure, or love, or many other things against what we must do to keep food on the table, and I can relate to that.

Babys1, no harm done, but thanks for explaining. I'd rather not live in California, thanks, but at least I live somewhere that my partnership does have some legal recognition. I wish California the best in pushing this through permanently.

Posted by: The other 5% | June 2, 2008 4:12 PM

Really, LizaBean? Donkey Kong?

Posted by: Anonymous | June 2, 2008 4:22 PM

"That's the way I feel about it. I don't care about fashion, so a movie that uses fashion as the means to talk about balancing what we must do with what we would like to do (which is what this sounds like to me, based on what little of SATC I've seen) leaves me cold"

I agree wholeheartedly. I have only seen a few snippets of the show since it is/was really not suitable for family viewing and I watch tv with the kids around. But, from what I did see, it all just seemed so superficial.

I have a daughter who desperately wishes she were a fashion diva, and we 'battle' over the fact that shoes are really not important in life as long as you have some to protect your feet. I have less than 10 pairs of shoes, and she would like to have 60. We tell her that she can have a lot of shoes when she can pay for them. The same goes for Coach bags and designer clothing.

Posted by: lurker | June 2, 2008 4:36 PM

I have to wonder if those who are critizing the show have actually seen it? The show is about 4 friends and how they relate to each other and how that dynamic changes upon marriage, or having a baby or dealing with a serious illness, the men, the sex, the clothes were just secondary. It is however, just a tv show, so of course things are embellished for entertainment purposes, otherwise it would be a documentary (not a reality show, since those things are more fiction than a scripted show). I'm not really into "chick stuff", hate chick flicks, never watched Desparate Housewives or Grey's Anatomy, but I enjoyed SATC, because it was well-written and the friendships reminded me of my own friendships and though we have qualities of the 4 ladies on the show, I would never say we indentify with any one charactor. One last thing, I find it rather funny that people can watch Indiana Jones or Iron Man and not complain about how "unrealistic it is".

Posted by: Anonymous | June 2, 2008 4:53 PM

Saw it yesterday, loved it. Cried a lot, especially related to Samantha. I have no problems being faithful, but last year I gave up everything and moved cross-country for a man who took me for granted. I miss DC like she missed NYC, and don't feel CA is right for me, either. I won't make that mistake again.

I heard rumors that someone would die in the movie (I really hoped it'd be Big--can't stand that guy, although I really like him on Law & Order). I always thought NYC was portrayed inaccurately on the show--there was virtually no crime, and there were very few racial minorities. It would have been interesting to see a crime in progress or something really serious happening. SPOILER ALERT When Steve showed up at the party, he looked so bereft I thought he was going to say something had happened to Magda, Brady, or his mother. END SPOILER Instead, the whole movie was related to sex and relationships. I shouldn't have expected better, but sometimes the show pleasantly surprised me with its depth.

I have a theory about the entire series. Most of my friends and I have a favorite character, but no one's favorite is Carrie. We all hate Carrie, but we strongly identify with one of the others. My favorite is Miranda, and I try to convince myself that I am just like her. My friends try to convince themselves that they are like one of the others. We all want to be blissfully hopeful like Charlotte, sexual and independent like Samantha, or smart and driven like Miranda. But we're all like Carrie--desperate, needy, willing to settle for a man who can't give us what we need, throwing away the one who can. There's a little of Carrie in all of us, and she represents the things about us that we dislike. Just sayin'...

Posted by: Mona | June 2, 2008 5:05 PM

"In the real world, Samantha would have an std or aids, Miranda would be a lesbian man hating career lawyer,Carrie would be a single over the hill woman with too many hookups under her belt and Charlotte would be a divorce' desperately trying to catch a man at the country club before her looks fade."

Wow!! Misogynist much?

Posted by: Emily | June 2, 2008 5:06 PM

Addendum: I was surprised that there were men in the audience at the showing I attended. I was trying to guess how many b*******s had to be given to get them to come along with their girlfriends, but then a friend pointed out to me that the worse you treat a guy, the more he likes you, and dragging a guy to SATC is pretty bad. So maybe these girls were on to something...

Posted by: Mona | June 2, 2008 5:08 PM

"I find it rather funny that people can watch Indiana Jones or Iron Man and not complain about how "unrealistic it is". "

There would be more complaints about how unrealistic Indiana Jones is if someone was trying to relate their life to his and how all his travel in search of antiquities really screwed with work/life balance.

Posted by: Who Cares? | June 2, 2008 5:16 PM

Mona,

Have you ditched takes-you-for-granted man yet?

On the men going to the movie, there's nothing like SATC to make a woman appreciate the flawed, but faithful normal guy she already has, LOL. In the other words, smart guys don't need to negotiate a payoff upfront. If he wants a date that guarantees a happy ending to the evening, take her to SATC. It's a sure thing.

Posted by: MN | June 2, 2008 5:16 PM

MN,

That sure is a lot of upfront suffering for what is a possible but not guaranteed outcome!

Posted by: Fred | June 2, 2008 5:27 PM

As of October last year, oh heck yes. I'm still reeling from the drama of it all. Though I have to admit that sometimes, the taking-for-granted often went both ways. Oh well, lesson learned.

He wouldn't have taken me to SATC, and I wouldn't have wanted him to. That's official chick time.

Posted by: MN | June 2, 2008 5:37 PM

Oh Fred, can you expand on the outcome you expect? I'm curious...

Posted by: babsy1 | June 2, 2008 5:42 PM

go back to what Mona said!

Posted by: Fred | June 2, 2008 5:44 PM

The last movie I went to with my girlfriends was "Charlie Wilson's War." Does that make us Mirandas, Carries, Charlottes, or Samanthas?

Posted by: babsy1 | June 2, 2008 5:55 PM

I am jealous. I think the last chick movie I went to see was Steel Magnolias. I am sure there must have been something more recent somewhere in there, but for the life of me, I can't remember what it was. My movie watching has been all Stuart Little, Finding Nemo, Indiana Jones, and Speed Racer for the past few years. Well, at least we aren' watching Barney anymore (although give us a couple of years and we will probably be back to Barney as well). But no Teletubbies. I have vowed that Teletubbies will never be allowed on our tv.

Posted by: Emily | June 2, 2008 6:43 PM

Awww, Fred. I can't believe that you just said that. You are bad!!

Posted by: Emily | June 2, 2008 6:45 PM

I was going to ignore this topic completely, but Fred got me thinking...
(always dangerous!)

DH and I used to watch the TV show sometimes. I'm a jeans and t-shirts type, so it wasn't for the fashions or the shoes. DH is my fashion consultant - when the office clothes aren't up to his standards, he drags me to the store and makes me try on things he selects off the racks, then buys the clothes that he thinks look good enough.

The only reason I can think of for why we used to watch the series: it was fun when it spiced up our bedroom time afterwards. But now I can't imagine us going to the movie at all. We'd both be more inspired (ahem) by opening a nice bottle of wine at home.

And the movies we see in the theaters are nearly always things that the whole family will enjoy - Indy was fun, but not the best of the bunch. Narnia was also a good time, but nobody remembered Susan kissing Prince Caspian in the book.

DH and younger son have plans to go to Speed Racer together for younger son's birthday in a couple of weeks. Older son and I aren't interested in that one, so we'll most likely skip it. Of course, that means I'll be taking older son out to a birthday movie he picks just a few days afterwards.

Posted by: Sue | June 2, 2008 7:31 PM

MN,

That sure is a lot of upfront suffering for what is a possible but not guaranteed outcome!

Posted by: Fred | June 2, 2008 5:27 PM


Fred,

Remind me never to take your advice on the ponies, LOL. I'd take those odds considering the short duration and minimal financial investment. Two hours and $20 sure beats Eliot Spitzer's investment.

Posted by: MN | June 2, 2008 8:39 PM

Uhhh, MN, that is two and ONE Half hours! The twenty for the tickets is merely admission fee to get into the theater. You forget the popcorn!

And I have never played the ponies. (Altho, Big Brown, unless he scratches, is looking mighty good!)

Posted by: Fred | June 2, 2008 8:59 PM

Leslie, I dunno if you read your comments so late in the day, but I saw the movie yesterday and was disappointed. I loved, loved the series. Thought the writing was snappy and it was hilarious and sometimes poignant (and that the fashion thread while not something I identify with was not the ultimate point of the show). I was underwhelmed by the movie - felt there was no cohesive narrative like the shows so often pulled off, thought it was way too long/slow paced, and thought it was just one big consumerist product placement (which I never thought about the show). I also felt like they gave Samantha's story short shrift...I think she would have gone after the neighbor before moving back to NYC! And that it would have been interesting to get into her head a bit more about her resolution...

Posted by: MamaBird/SurelyYouNest | June 2, 2008 10:18 PM

Emily, your Steel Magnolia reference totally cracked me up. I get to more movies now but I remember the days when it seemed an impossibility to go out on a Saturday night or any other time for a 2 hour block.

Also, I find the fashion in SATC totally secondary as well.

Thanks for a good discussion...

Posted by: Leslie | June 3, 2008 6:39 AM

As a fan of SATC, I was looking forward to seeing where the girls landed 4 years later. After seeing Indiana Jones the previous weekend, and finding it unimaginative and ridiculous, I wasn't expecting greatness from SATC. I was pleasantly surprised that the movie was pretty good, but not great. Mostly, I saw that some women never grow past a certain point (Carrie) and that the other 3 had actually gotten on with their lives were doing quite well. Nice mini reunion.

Posted by: glamoursmith | June 4, 2008 1:31 PM

Loved it. But I really enjoyed watching the show (mostly via DVD) because it was well-written and acted, and it was just a pleasure to watch. I'll miss SJP and the gang, but the movie made it clear that this is it, there ain't no more, the fat lady has sung.

Leslie, thanks for bringing this one up again. I was hoping you would.

Posted by: chausti | June 12, 2008 10:13 PM

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