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Baby Bounceback

Five hours after giving birth to 6-pound 14-ounce Isaac Sorensen, University of Nebraska at Kearney women's basketball coach Carol Russell helped lead her team from the bench. Now that's commitment!

Let's see. What was I doing five hours after giving birth? Learning to breastfeed? Sleeping? Recovering from the pain? Changing diapers?

What about you? Could you imagine being so committed to your job that you show up for work the day you give birth? Coach Russell did admit to being tired during the game. Meaning, she didn't stand the entire time. Amazing! Kudos Coach.

Today's Talkers: 'No Child' Changes Considered ... Two Toys Recalled for Having High Lead Levels, Elite Operations Toy Sets and Mood Necklaces ... High School Musical: The Ice Tour Tickets Go on Sale April 2 ... Chickenpox Vaccine's Effects Lessen Over Time ... Gay Male Parents Get Dedicated Fertility Clinic.

By Stacey Garfinkle |  March 15, 2007; 10:00 AM ET  | Category:  Babies , Pregnancy
Previous: Break Time | Next: The Debate: No Child Left Behind

Comments


I'm not sure going back to work five hours after giving birth is something we should be praising. This is time that the mother should be spending bonding with her new baby and physically recovering so she has the energy and stamina to take care of him or her.

Becoming a parent brings a set of responsibilities and priorities. Regardless how you feel about working vs. staying home (I went back to work after 6 weeks), I thought it was a given that a mother's priority the very first day of her baby's life is the baby. I guess I was wrong.

Posted by: CLM | March 15, 2007 10:06 AM | Report abuse

Hmmm. Should we applaud her or think she needs her head examined? I'm leaning towards the second. Dedication can be good but the priorities here seem a little bit off. Wouldn't have been me.

Posted by: Rockville Mom | March 15, 2007 10:11 AM | Report abuse

I totally agree with CLM. Why are we praising this? If your baby takes a back seat to your job on its very first day of life what does that say about every day after that?

I'm all for having commitment to your profession but come on people, this is getting out of control.

Posted by: This is a good thing?? | March 15, 2007 10:15 AM | Report abuse

Kudos? Its exactly this idea that working no matter what that is destroying our families and our health. BTW, I wouldn't applaud a father who left his baby 5 hours after the birth either. When exactly is it time to just stop?

Posted by: moxiemom | March 15, 2007 10:16 AM | Report abuse

To answer your last question on one word - NO

Posted by: JL | March 15, 2007 10:26 AM | Report abuse

Playing Devil's Advocate: must be nice to have had an easy enough labor and delivery to be able to do that and show such committment to her team (who should respond by showing the same to her).

Posted by: Just Because | March 15, 2007 10:26 AM | Report abuse

I wanted to gag when I heard about this story. She has her priorities out of whack, and frankly, the fact that so many are singing her praises (not here, but the take of it in the media) is evidence of how parenthood is simply not supported in this country.

Posted by: Arlington Mom | March 15, 2007 10:26 AM | Report abuse

Hear, hear to the previous comments. This is NOT something good. Has our society so lost sight of what is important that a mother isn't holding their child in wonder five hours after birth but is instead screaming at players? This is just sick. Sorry if that offends anyone but exactly how I feel.

Posted by: NC MOM | March 15, 2007 10:28 AM | Report abuse

I do join in the kudos to the coach. She made a choice that was right for her and for her family. She's not saying anyone else needs to do that. If she wanted to also be with her team, who are we to criticize?

The kudos is for her doing what was right for her and her family.

Posted by: wdc | March 15, 2007 10:30 AM | Report abuse

No job is so important that she couldn't take even 2 days to recoup and be with her baby.

Posted by: Corinne | March 15, 2007 10:31 AM | Report abuse

She clearly felt like she would be letting down her players, many of whom probably look up to her as a parental figure, if she could attend the game and did not. The article says that her husband was with her and presumably watching the baby, so it's not as if the baby wasn't being cared for. Plus it was like what, 2 hours that the baby will never remember? Given that this was the last game of the season for her team, I can definitely understand her decision.

Posted by: Contrarian | March 15, 2007 10:35 AM | Report abuse

Never underestimate the power of adrenaline during birth. My wife was pushing that stroller for hours a day when our second one was a few weeks old and people marveled that she was back to a weight she was happy with so quickly. New mothers work like crazy, so from everything I've seen the people who take parenthood the hardest are people who either:
1. have colicky babies
2. have PPD
3. want to make things hard to get attention

We had a tough first one and an easy second one (with medical problems that required many doctor visits). In general, it's all about attitude. If you want to succeed, you will succeed. If you want to pretend it's all too tough, then it's all too tough for you. Nothing is too hard for me, certainly the same can be said for my wife far more than for me, so therefore we achieve everything we try to do. It's just that easy.

Native Americans survived for thousands of years with limited medicinal technology. They had babies and after a few days were up gathering food, hunting, and farming or else they'd die. Not saying that Western Medicine hasn't prolonged lives, but my wife has proven to me over and over again that your personal attitude solves 75% of the problems you have. Bravo for the coach proving that women are strong.

Posted by: Bethesdan | March 15, 2007 10:41 AM | Report abuse

It is a tragic day when a mother choses a basketball game over her own baby. There will be other games for sure, but she'll never get back the time with her newborn child. I'm sure her child will hear of her choice someday...and that is even more tragic.

Posted by: CPR | March 15, 2007 10:41 AM | Report abuse

Hmmm... what was I doing five hours after giving birth? Entertaining family and friends! Playing 'pass the baby'. And reallllllllly tired! But, here's a coach who watched her team grow and win all season - she just wanted to be there. I think there is a lot of that in sports - probably in other areas as well. And she felt good enough to do it! A couple of hours isn't going to harm the baby; I would be more concerned for her health! And, the article doesn't say, but I will assume that the coach is going to be taking some time off now.

Posted by: ouch! | March 15, 2007 10:44 AM | Report abuse

It's not a choice that I would have made or would encourage. However, if that is what she wanted to do, I don't think her baby is going to be harmed forever by her decision.

Posted by: MOMto3 | March 15, 2007 10:46 AM | Report abuse

Sorry, I am all for working moms and their choices but this is INSANE! Even with an easy birth, I don't see why this would be necessary. What is she trying to prove?

This is just not reasonable.


Posted by: JS | March 15, 2007 10:47 AM | Report abuse

I'm pregnant right now, and I can't even imagine doing something like this. I'm not sure it's my place to say that what she did was wrong, but it certainly probably was AMA (against medical advice). Nevermind bonding with the baby (which I think she should have done for a little longer than a few hours!), but what about her own health, as a previous poster mentioned?

I'm not sure how I feel about giving this woman "kudos."

Posted by: dlm79 | March 15, 2007 10:47 AM | Report abuse

On one hand: I have a high tolerance for pain (speaking medically - I don't notice pain when I should but only when the problem causing the pain gets very bad). I also had an excellent birthing team of my husband, an excellant midwife, and birthing nurse. I experienced no trauma from the natural birth of my daughter. I was able to eat dinner just after the birth (while daughter was being checked in nursery). I could have gotten up and walked away if I wanted.

On the other hand: I stayed in the hospital and enjoyed every moment of my two days with my daughter and husband. I personnally wouldn't have it any other way.

On another hand, I did start working again, from home, within 10 days of birth because I felt I needed to in order to maintain my sanity. To each their own.

On the final hand: As long as some family member, preferably the dad, was caring for her baby and providing it with love and attention, then good for her. Why is it only the mom? My husband was the primary caregiver to our daughter. In some respects, he always will be. Some mothering aspects have never come naturally to me so he took over those roles. Works for us.

Posted by: Private School Mom | March 15, 2007 10:50 AM | Report abuse

Hey, Bethesdan. IT's all about attitude, huh? In other words, if I'd just had a better attitude, my kid wouldn't have ended up in the NICU? We wouldn't have had to deal with respiratory distress and pediatric open heart surgery and specialists? You're right. GOSh, how selfish of me to have had the wrong attitude and brought all that attention that I was craving to my family and myself.

So anyone who ever requires assistance of any kind is just a whiner? That's kind of bizarre . . .

Posted by: To Bethesdan | March 15, 2007 10:59 AM | Report abuse

It's just a bad strategy. Speaking as the husband, now she has no leverage to ask her husband to fetch her tea, change the baby in the middle of the night, install the car seat, or any of the million other things we as new fathers do in response to the huge imbalance caused in the partnership and resulting father's guilt when the wife delivers a baby.

new mother: "Honey, can you carry this load of landry down to the basment?"

normal response from new father: "Yes, right away, Tide or Dreft? Can I get you something to eat while I'm up."

Mr. Russell's imagined response, "You coached a game five hours after delivering, laundry should be easy."

Posted by: Arlington Dad | March 15, 2007 11:06 AM | Report abuse

"IT's all about attitude, huh? In other words, if I'd just had a better attitude, my kid wouldn't have ended up in the NICU?"

Forget the Native American women and the basketball coach -- YOU are the strong one for making it through such a tough time.

Posted by: Arlington Dad | March 15, 2007 11:11 AM | Report abuse

This is so weird to me. I can't imagine leaving a child I had just given birth to in order to go to work. Sorry, would never happen. I didn't want my baby out of my sight for days after I gave birth. Strange woman, but to each her own I suppose.

Posted by: Emmy | March 15, 2007 11:13 AM | Report abuse

I think you must be a close friend of Tom Cruise's. That's right -- PPD is all about attitude. (sarcasm intended)

Posted by: To Bethesdan | March 15, 2007 11:23 AM | Report abuse

Coach Russell is truly amazing. I must agree. I just hope that this bouce back does not become the new standard.

Posted by: bobina | March 15, 2007 11:25 AM | Report abuse

Would it be different if she'd tuned in to watch the game on TV? Plenty of people give birth and manage TV time within that time period. She was just in good shape.

I would be interested to know if she had anesthesia. I had an epidural for my first child and was out of commission afterwards. My second was born so quickly there wasn't time, and I was up and around within an hour.

I think this is a woman who loves a ball game. Did the baby go with her?

Posted by: AnnR | March 15, 2007 11:31 AM | Report abuse


Good lord, "tragic." Come on. What if, instead of a mom, this was a father who left five hours after the birth of his child to coach his team in the playoffs etc.... Highly unlikely he would be subject to this level of criticism, and if he was only gone a handful of hours, why should he be? I am surprised that this coach was physically and emotionally able to do this five *hours* after birth...but it doesn't necessarily indicate she will be a neglectful mom. If, as an adult, someone told me my mother had done this, and throughout my life she had been present and involved, I would be in awe of her abilities. Life is loooooong, she has plenty of time to bond with her child.

Posted by: Bethesda, MD | March 15, 2007 11:41 AM | Report abuse

I remember working with a lady who showed up to work 2 days after having her baby because "she was bored". Say what?

Posted by: C.W. | March 15, 2007 11:59 AM | Report abuse

I say kudos for this instance. We can't put our lives on hold because we get pregnant and a baby chooses to come when it will. If she was feeling well enough to go do it, I say great! I hardly think the baby will be able to say "My life was ruined because you didn't stay in bed the two days after I was born!"

Now, if she misses the kids first birthday due to a pre-season game, then we might talk priority issues.

Mothers in the past had to be up and working right after birth. I'm not saying we should suggest moms OR dads shouldn't take breaks and celebrate their new child, but in this particular instance, I think she was pretty impressive and did a fine thing.

Posted by: Liz D | March 15, 2007 12:09 PM | Report abuse

Carol Russell is one tough chick I wouldn't want to mess with. No mystery to me why she a coach of a championship team.

Posted by: Father of 4 | March 15, 2007 12:10 PM | Report abuse

Had a C-section, so no I can't imagine. But it doesn't sound rational to me. Her newborn needed her more then a team of adult athletes.

Posted by: foamgnome | March 15, 2007 1:02 PM | Report abuse

It wouldn't be for me, but I think people are being way too critical of her. This was an important game and while her first priority should be her child, and I have no reason to doubt that is the case, she also had made a season-long commitment to her players that I do respect. No doubt her presence there was truly inspirational to them.

I am expecting my third child next month, by the way. I've had natural deliveries. I *could* have been up and about five hours after delivery, no question - I just chose not to be (and please don't tell my husband I just said that). The person who posted about Mr. Russell's now-heightened expectations about his wife's abilities in the postpartum period has it SO RIGHT!!! :)

Posted by: lawyer mom | March 15, 2007 1:12 PM | Report abuse

I recently gave birth and left the hospital the next day. The hospital room was uncomfortable. I applaud the coach for making it to the game b/c she obviously has a job she loves!

Posted by: lilac's mom | March 15, 2007 1:24 PM | Report abuse

The article specifically mentions she had permission from her doctors to attend the game, so it wasn't AMA. Let's not pile it on, people.

Posted by: Anonymous | March 15, 2007 1:30 PM | Report abuse

To Liz D - we can't put our lives on hold because we choose to get pregnant and the baby comes when it will??? Well, when exactly, are we suppose to put our lives on hold if not then?

The question is not what is physically appropriate (the coach was able to attend the game) or what the baby will remember (no, I don't think the baby will be permanently scarred by this). It is about choices and priorities. Yes, she coached her team all year to a championship. Yes, that is important. But she has been pregnant for 9 months and knew when she was due. This was not an unexpected event. Maybe she hoped to not go into labor until after the championship but that did not happen and one of the first choices she made as a new mother was to put the needs of her job over that of her child.

As they say - you are what you do.

Posted by: Huh? | March 15, 2007 1:47 PM | Report abuse

To Huh?

I also said "I'm not saying we should suggest moms OR dads shouldn't take breaks and celebrate their new child"

She had travelled to that town specifically for that game. I don't think the baby was neglected or forgotten or that the game came before the child.

It's also the last game she'll ever get to go to for a very long time where she doesn't have to worry about who is taking care of her child and how to arrange it- so take advantage!

Posted by: Liz D | March 15, 2007 1:54 PM | Report abuse

"This was not an unexpected event. Maybe she hoped to not go into labor until after the championship but that did not happen and one of the first choices she made as a new mother was to put the needs of her job over that of her child.

As they say - you are what you do."


This comment struck me, because as I was remembering the birth of my first, I also remembered that we had promised to help my brother move the day after my ds was born. I didn't go (ala Coach), but my ds did. Granted, it's not exactly the same situation, but still. I'm sure my brother would have totally understood (like the team), but both my ds and I felt that it would be fine to take a few hours to help my brother move into his first house.

And, it's not like the coach when to the office for a meeting or write up a contract. Or even to attend a practice or coaches meeting. This was the championships!

Posted by: ouch! | March 15, 2007 2:01 PM | Report abuse

Ooops... i meant to type dh, not ds. My 1 day old ds did NOT help my brother move into his nw house! :)

Posted by: ouch! | March 15, 2007 2:03 PM | Report abuse

I hope they lost. How sad that a bunch of girls is more important than your own kid.

What a control freak.

Posted by: Anonymous | March 15, 2007 2:06 PM | Report abuse

Huh? asked "To Liz D - we can't put our lives on hold because we choose to get pregnant"

Obviously Huh? isn't aware of Liz D's strict "one child rule." Otherwise Huh? would know that putting our lives on hold is fine, since it's only that one time!

Posted by: Arlington Dad | March 15, 2007 2:08 PM | Report abuse

You know, I'm trying to have a problem with her behavior and personally, I just can't.

Reasoning is as follows: she made a commitment to her team to coach them and see them through the season (before you jump down my throat, hear me out). She did so. She was able to do so and she did not abandon her child in the process, as nothing I'm reading about this says that she didn't make sure the child wasn't cared for in her absence.

She does also have a commitment she made to be a parent, just like the child's father does. If she is able to fulfill both commitments in a satisfactory (to her and her family) manner, more power to her.

(In my book, being sure that the child is in responsible care and making sure its needs will be attended to would be doing so, whether she personally provides them or not.)

Posted by: FWIW | March 15, 2007 2:12 PM | Report abuse

"The kudos is for her doing what was right for her and her family. "

She did what was right for her, not her and her family. What does her family have to do with a ball game?

Liz D - ummm, she did miss her child's first birthday for a game - IT WAS THAT DAY! Believe you me, a 1 year old no more remembers their 1st birthday than a newborn, but is our job as parents only to be there when they remember. Is that the only effort the one that counts? Seems like everyone is so driven that we can't be bothered with relationships anymore, births, deaths, all interruptions to work. Sad.

Posted by: moxiemom | March 15, 2007 2:13 PM | Report abuse

Given the circumstances, I can understand. A couple of key items
1. She did not show up to coach, she showed up and watched. Her team was NOT expecting her at the game.

2. She travelled with her OB records just in case she went into labor. Seems to me that can be taken as a sign she wanted her daughter delivered safely.

Lets face it here folks, a college athletic coach is not the same kind of job most of us have. Playing in championship games is frankly, an important part of the coaching career. Just was you or I may face negative evaluations for performance failures, coaches have to contend with post-season play as a measure of their financial worth and/or contract renewals. Fairly or unfairly, a coach is evaluated on how the players perform. She was hoping that her appearance would give her team the added boost it would need to win (it didn't).

And since we are talking about balance, I frankly would not want to be in the shoes of any coach at any level. How many kids of coaches have had their coaching parent miss an important event because of "work" obligations? In the relm of college athletics, the coach's spouse is often a stay at home parent so the coach is the sole wage earner. This case strikes me as similar to any family where one spouse is expected to travel a lot. How do they manage balance? If they do it well, good for them. If not, well, some therapist is going to make a lot of money.

An an anectdotale note, my neighbor demanded to be discharged the same day she had her C-section so she could get home to her eldest. Crazy? Yes, but no crazier than the life of a college coach.

Posted by: LM in WI | March 15, 2007 2:23 PM | Report abuse

To James B

The baby was left in the care her presumably competant father who stayed at the hospital with her. Neglected? I think not.

Posted by: LM in WI | March 15, 2007 2:25 PM | Report abuse

I say Kudos to her for recognizing what's going to make her happy. The kid won't remember those 2 hours for the game, she got to feel like a human being again, her team was probably thrilled to see her, winning the game probably gave her even more adrenaline and made her feel great when she returned to bond with the kid. The kid was probably asleep during the game and if the father, rather than the mother, held her, what's wrong with that. Plenty of mothers end up in surgery or asleep after giving birth and are therefore not bonding with the kid 5 hours later. The kid will be fine and Coach Russell will be a better mother knowing that knows how to make choices that are right for her and don't harm her child.

Posted by: sally | March 15, 2007 2:26 PM | Report abuse

Native Americans survived for thousands of years with limited medicinal technology. They had babies and after a few days were up gathering food, hunting, and farming or else they'd die. Not saying that Western Medicine hasn't prolonged lives, but my wife has proven to me over and over again that your personal attitude solves 75% of the problems you have.

Uh, yeah, those of them that didn't DIE DURING CHILDBIRTH. My conclusion from this article was that this woman must have had a very easy birth. C-sections, for example, were invented for a reason, and I don't think that the reason was the "personal attitude" of the women in labor. 5 hours after my kid's birth, I was still throwing up every time my head was raised more than 6 inches from a prone position. Get a personal attitude for that!

Posted by: m | March 15, 2007 2:29 PM | Report abuse

"An an anectdotale note, my neighbor demanded to be discharged the same day she had her C-section so she could get home to her eldest. Crazy? Yes, but no crazier than the life of a college coach."

No different. YOu must not have children. It is very different to go to extreme lengths to ensure that both your children are well than it is to go to extreme lengths to see that 20 yr. old women who are unrelated are happy. I also don't buy that being a college basketball coach is some crazy job where they can't stop. Geeze, even my sil who is a hot shot investment banker stopped flying at 35 weeks and took time off after having her baby. I doubt that billion dollar deals are any less pressing than college basketball.

Posted by: moxiemom | March 15, 2007 2:32 PM | Report abuse

ooohhh, moxiemom, good point about the birthday! I also have another phrase that I like (because I like trite phrases:)

"each day in a child's life is less important than the one before it"

Basically meaning that every day our children grow older we have less and less of an opportunity to have a significant influence on their lives.

To ouch! - Even though I think both parents are equally responsible for the kids there is a double standard for men and women when it comes to the birthing. I don't think your DH helping your brother move is the same thing as the coach attending a game 5 hours after BIRTHING a baby. I did let my husband leave my side the day after our children were born...he needed to get me Starbucks. :)

Posted by: Huh? again | March 15, 2007 2:37 PM | Report abuse

Wow, I can't even fathom how this woman physically did this let alone emotionally did this. I could barely walk for a week after delivering my daughter. And there is nothing in this world that could have torn me away from that precious baby I waited so long to hold in my arms. But, then again that is me and different strokes for different folks.

I do however hope that men (and employers) don't think every woman really can do something like this right after birth and that we are just milking it or something. She obviously did not have 24 hours of labor with 4 hours of straight pushing like I did!

Posted by: ka | March 15, 2007 3:04 PM | Report abuse

I come down on the "this is a bad idea" side. My wife was surprisingly spry hours after my son was born, happy to hop around thr room showing off our newborn to family and friends, including a doctor friend who suggested she take it easier. Was she ever right. My wife ended up paying the price for not taking it easy at first - she was tired for days thereafter and, if I recall, had trouble with her sutures. Imagine adding the physical and emotional toll of coaching a game on top of that.

Posted by: Daddy G. | March 15, 2007 3:17 PM | Report abuse

"Good lord, "tragic." Come on. What if, instead of a mom, this was a father who left five hours after the birth of his child to coach his team in the playoffs etc.... Highly unlikely he would be subject to this level of criticism"

I do not agree that people wouldn't have a problem with this if she were a man. I would have a huge problem hearing about a husband leaving his new born child and wife hours after she gave birth. Actually, I would have a much bigger problem with a man doing this than a woman!

Posted by: To Bethesda | March 15, 2007 3:18 PM | Report abuse

It's an amazing story that speaks well for the woman's physician (or midwife) as well as the mom that she was in great enough shape to do that 5 hours after birth. I can see that it might be possible.

Women have all kinds of reactions to childbirth. My reaction was fascination and delight, and a strong wish to be alone and gaze at my child (lots of visitors!). I had a "good" labor and birth. Not all women are lucky enough to bond with their child right after birth (some feel nothing, some feel dismay, etc. -- it says nothing about how they will be as a mom in the long term).

I felt like my work had been adequately wrapped up, as well. Maternity leave weighed heavily on my mind as my due date drew near (making sure my coworkers were properly prepared). In fact, I'm sure that my son was a bit underweight because of the stress I was under (there is a study correlating birth weight to work stress. Luckily, he's always been fine and healthy).

I can see that this game perhaps was something the coach wanted to do mentally before she could really be there for her child "in full", especially if it is her first child.

I wouldn't have done it, but I can understand it completely.

Posted by: Rebecca | March 15, 2007 3:33 PM | Report abuse

"In general, it's all about attitude. If you want to succeed, you will succeed. If you want to pretend it's all too tough, then it's all too tough for you. Nothing is too hard for me, certainly the same can be said for my wife far more than for me, so therefore we achieve everything we try to do. It's just that easy."

Is the dad from Little Miss Sunshine posting on this blog?

Posted by: Anonymous | March 15, 2007 3:48 PM | Report abuse

Whatever...we are all just coming here to have a good argument anyway. I come here to read vicariously through them all. Especially on the "On Balance" board--where someone writes a perfectly pleasant opinion, to which they are entitled, and somewhere after about the third post, someone comes along and SLAM! proceeds to tell them exactly how wrong they are, how they are only worried about money and your momma wears army boots too! Very entertaining.

Posted by: all in good fun... | March 15, 2007 3:50 PM | Report abuse

Is the dad from Little Miss Sunshine posting on this blog?


Posted by: | March 15, 2007 03:48 PM

LOL - well done!

Posted by: moxiemom | March 15, 2007 4:01 PM | Report abuse

The difference is that next year the day will already be set down and this year, there wasn't a specific day. The baby could have been born tomorrow, or next week. The mother was as prepared as could be, felt good enough to go to the game.

I'm not sure how missing a few hours of a baby's first day is such a tragedy for anyone? What about adopted children who don't even meet their parents for the first few years?

And frankly, my mother did miss a few "big deals" in my life because of work. As a single mom, it happened occasionally. I still love her, I still know she loves me and we have a great relationship.

We can go back and forth on where WE draw the line for balance in our lives- what priorities come first at what point in time. But I can't see how any real damage was done here in the process, I can see how everyone seems happy at the end of it, and I see no evidence that the mother will make bad choices given future circumstances.

Posted by: Liz D | March 15, 2007 4:20 PM | Report abuse

Hey, Bethesdan. IT's all about attitude, huh? In other words, if I'd just had a better attitude, my kid wouldn't have ended up in the NICU? We wouldn't have had to deal with respiratory distress and pediatric open heart surgery and specialists?
----------

I have no idea who you're talking to, but your post has less than zero to do with what I wrote. Re-read my post. Apology accepted in advance.

Posted by: Bethesdan | March 15, 2007 8:34 PM | Report abuse

As someone with easy births, relatively speaking, I can understand her having gone. It isn't something a woman could plan on doing-- I think I would have been up for it after one out of three births.

I know some people are shocked that she wasn't spending her time gazing at her newborn, but, honestly, newborns sleep almost all the time, she had women who were counting on her, and it was only a few hours. I'm sure she spent plenty of time with her baby after that.

Posted by: YetAnotherSAHM | March 15, 2007 10:55 PM | Report abuse

This is not something to applaud or admire. I question the judgment of her Doctors also.

Posted by: OLDER MOM | March 16, 2007 9:57 AM | Report abuse

Personally, I think there is something severely wrong with a woman who would do this. That poor kid. I think a lot of the folks who are posting here don't have kids, and probably don't like them very much.

Posted by: StudentMom | March 16, 2007 10:42 AM | Report abuse

When I was ten years old I read in my mom's McCall's magazine that there are women who actually (have to) work the next day after delivery (and therefore do). Forgive me for the question because I am a man, and at that have not the slightest personal experience whatsoever, is this allegation true?

Posted by: is McCall magazine true tell me | March 21, 2007 1:09 PM | Report abuse

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