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The Games We Play; Plus, Harry Potter

Do you know what games your kids are playing when you're not watching? Levi Draher's mom certainly didn't. In eighth grade, Levi learned the choking game. In ninth grade, to the dismay of a friend, he played the game a few times alone, according to the Cullman (Ala.) Times. Then, Levi's mother found him hanging in his dorm room. Though he was clinically dead, she and doctors were able to revive him.

Now, Levi spends some time warning other kids about the dangers of playing games with their lives. He tells of dying and coming back to life. For those of you unfamiliar with the generations-old choking game (here are some warning signs), it's an asphyxiation high also known as the passout game, Space Monkey and Black Out.

What games do you worry about your kids trying when you're not around? Do you tell (or plan to tell) your tweens and teens about the things you did when you were young that you wouldn't want them to replicate?

Today's Talkers, Part 1: Harry Potter Cover Released


"Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows" (AP Photo/Scholastic)

"Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows" may not be in our -- er our kids' -- hands until July 21, but in case you're itching to get your hands on the final book as much as I am, here's a preview. Scholastic Books yesterday released images of the front and back covers. So, here are the only clues we're likely to get till then, courtesy of Scholastic's press release:


"The front cover of 'Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows' features a dramatic sky of oranges and golds. It depicts 17-year-old Harry with arm outstretched, reaching upward. The structures around Harry show evident
destruction and in the shadows behind him, we see outlines of other people," said David Saylor, Scholastic's vice president and creative director who has designed all seven Harry Potter covers. ... "On the back cover spidery hands are outstretched towards Harry. Only when the book is opened does one see a powerful image of He-Who-Must-Not-Be-Named, his glowing red eyes peering out from his hood."

Today's Talkers, Part 2: Study Finds Ads Targeted at Kids Are Heavy on Snacks ... Anxiety Rising on U.S. College Campuses ... Supreme Court to Review Child Porn Law ... Lawmakers Eye Incentives for Kids' Therapies

By Stacey Garfinkle |  March 29, 2007; 7:07 AM ET  | Category:  Teens , Tweens
Previous: What's So Wrong With Formula? | Next: The Debate: Should Governments Stop Spanking?

Comments


These games are an indicator of why SAHMs are important even after they are little. Someone needs know what they are up to.

Posted by: Anonymous | March 29, 2007 8:02 AM | Report abuse

"These games are an indicator of why SAHMs are important even after they are little. Someone needs know what they are up to"

A lot of these games go on in the basement while the SAHM is boozing and watching Oprah/Dr. Phil upstairs.

Posted by: Anonymous | March 29, 2007 8:10 AM | Report abuse

Since Levi attended a boarding school, don't think the SAHM would have made any difference.

Posted by: Anonymous | March 29, 2007 8:14 AM | Report abuse

"These games are an indicator of why SAHMs are important even after they are little. Someone needs know what they are up to"

"A lot of these games go on in the basement while the SAHM is boozing and watching Oprah/Dr. Phil upstairs."

This is why SOMEONE needs to know what these kinds are up to -- whether it be an INVOLVED SAHM, SAHD, nanny, babysitter, grandparent etc. Even after kids are little, they need supervision, not just "left alone."

Posted by: Marie | March 29, 2007 8:42 AM | Report abuse

Oh and I love Harry Potter. I am in the middle of reading all of the previous books to be ready for the last book.

Posted by: Marie | March 29, 2007 8:44 AM | Report abuse

Do the WOHMs realize that the characterization of SAHMs as lazy and boozy is just as small minded and insulting as the characterization of WOHMs as uninvolved and selfish? Just because you feel defensive about your choice does not mean that you should try to dimish someone elses'. The point I was trying to make was that SAHPs continue to be important after children are small - something many people dont' think about. It was not intended as a dig at WOHPs.

Posted by: Thursday SAHM | March 29, 2007 8:45 AM | Report abuse

Your intentions did not come through in your original post. Slamming WOHP or SAHP is not productive.

Posted by: To Thursday SAHM | March 29, 2007 8:50 AM | Report abuse

How is saying that being a SAHM is important a slam at WOHPs? It is no different than a WOHP saying that they feel they are providing a positive role model for their children. Should I interpret that remark to mean that I am not providing a positive role model? I don't.

Posted by: Thursday SAHM | March 29, 2007 8:52 AM | Report abuse

"It was not intended as a dig at WOHPs."

What was the intent? Levi attends a boarding school so the SAHM issue is mute in his case.

Many WOHPs can arrange their schedules to be home when their children are home and are important to their children after they are small. You are not the first person to come up with this concept!

Posted by: Anonymous | March 29, 2007 8:53 AM | Report abuse

"The point I was trying to make was that SAHPs continue to be important after children are small - something many people dont' think about."

You must know some pretty stupid people.

And yes, the kids of SAHPs NEVER, EVER get into trouble.

Posted by: Anonymous | March 29, 2007 8:55 AM | Report abuse

Frankly, I never heard of this game. It's incredibly stupid and people who do it are nuts. What kind of parents raise these kids? I never heard of that autoerotic masturbation thing until I worked at the police department. A lot of prisoners do it and we had a local college professor (!) die while doing it. I always thought it was warped, sick and squirelly. Same as that choking game teens are doing. Jeez.

Posted by: Anonymous | March 29, 2007 9:06 AM | Report abuse

OK, how does HP fit into the choking game? I know some very good SAHMs and none of them are boozers or spend a lot of time watching day time TV. I also know some fabulous WOHMs. Most WOHMs do not leave their kids unattended for very long after school. When I was a kid, mom SAH. I rarely saw her from the time school let out till dark. I wish society was safer and we could go back to the only rule was to show up at the dinner table.

Posted by: foamgnome | March 29, 2007 9:07 AM | Report abuse

and so starts another round of the "I'm better than you are" bites ...

this blog is tiring. have a good time slamming each other. I'm going to go to another site.

Posted by: JGO | March 29, 2007 9:08 AM | Report abuse

"What kind of parents raise these kids?" Seriously??? All kinds of parents. What amazes me sometimes is the fact that people think, "not my kid. Not my kids friends." All parents (SAHP, WOHP, single parents, married parents, widowed parents, rich parents, poor parents etc) have to worry about all of these things (these stupid games, drugs, bad grades, guns, etc) with our kids. Some have to worry more than others about certain things, but please dont fall into the trap of its stupid, so not my kid.

Posted by: Marie | March 29, 2007 9:11 AM | Report abuse

WOhhh, did I inadvertently log onto the 7th grade blog? You all are reading way too much into these statments. By the way to point is moot not mute meaning not debatable instead of unable to speak as 8:53 wrote.

Clearly you think that your choices are good for you and I think mine are good for me. Why do you insist on making your point through trying to make others seem less? Your words would have more power if they rose above sophmoric insults and reflected well thought out arguments.

I will be a good, boozy SAHM and go fix a mimosa and take my beating while I watch Ellen in a haze as my children play with knives and guns.

Posted by: Thursday SAHM | March 29, 2007 9:12 AM | Report abuse

Why does this issue have anything to do with staying at home or working. Kids do dumb things, it is a fact of life. I am willing to bet every single one of us did, I know I did. You have a sence of invincibility when you are 14,15,16,17. Nothing bad can happen to you. The hanging game is just done for the buzz that kids get by cutting the oxygen to their brain. Clearly it is insanely stupid and even more so when you do it alone. However, very good parents have kids who do stupid things. I don't think we need to be here criticizing the decision to stay home or work as the reason for kids doing things. The focus needs to be on talking to your kids so they make good decisions.

Posted by: HappyDad | March 29, 2007 9:17 AM | Report abuse

Great Comment Happy Dad!!

Posted by: Marie | March 29, 2007 9:20 AM | Report abuse

Seems to me that no matter who's watching, kids will find ways to get into trouble. It's scary, but it's also a fact of life that we all have to deal with somehow.

Of course, parents should be making efforts to know what their kids are up to, an should do their best to instill in those kids whatever values will prevent them from playing games with their lives. But we can't protect them from all harms.

When DH was a kid, he and his buddies would go "stealthing," driving around their town after dark with no lights on. Meanwhile, I was sitting at home, trapped by parents who knew where I was every second of every day because I wasn't allowed to go anywhere. As much as my DH's youthful exploits make me shudder, I'd far rather DD's childhood mirror his than mine.

Posted by: NewSAHM | March 29, 2007 9:23 AM | Report abuse

I don't think having a SAHM or WOHM has anything to do with this type of behavior. This kind of stuff is why it is important for parents to know their child's friends and the friends' parents all the way through school. It's why parents need to be able to talk to their kids about these kinds of things without saying, if you do that you are an idiot. The issue isn't SAHM or WOHM, it's parents who assume their kids would never do this stuff. Assume that they might, talk to them about facts....about why this is dangerous....and about how to walk away from a situation that is dangerous.

Posted by: MOMto3 | March 29, 2007 9:23 AM | Report abuse

to Thursday SAHM: your wrote about your statement, "It was not intended as a dig at WOHPs."

Yes, it was.

Otherwise you would have stated something a lot less inflammatory, like, "This is why it is so important to make sure your older kids are not left to do as they please. They need guidance in learning how to manage their unsupervised time."


Posted by: JerseyGirl | March 29, 2007 9:27 AM | Report abuse

The scariest thing is that no matter what you do, your kid can make a stupid decision that affects his/her whole life or god forbid kills them or someone else. So I guess besides good communication, knowing their friends, what else can a parent do? I know I did some stupid things as a kid. Luckily never got into drugs or sex stuff. But I was just lucky. How do I protect my kid?

Posted by: foamgnome | March 29, 2007 9:29 AM | Report abuse

Thursday SAHM
AKA The Spelling Police

It's sophomoric, not "sophmoric".

Posted by: Anonymous | March 29, 2007 9:32 AM | Report abuse

Conundrum:

Should a parent decribe the dangers of this deathly game to their kids? At what age? Or would that risk adolescent/juvenile curiousity for my kid or my kids contemporaries that hear about it second hand?

How do parent experts suggest that the risk of suicidal behavior due to some of today's medications (Ritalin pops in mind) be presented to kids, tweens, teens?

I lean towards communication since I trust my kids, their maturity and judgement. But clearly one size doesnt fit all in the deathly hallows of growing up in America.

Posted by: Fo3 | March 29, 2007 9:37 AM | Report abuse

Jersey Girl - I was unaware that you were able to divine the intent of actions. You should work for the FBI.

This board is so very hostile to the SAHM. I will state again, there is nothing wrong with stating that being a SAHM is a role that is positive and provides value to the family and the community. WOHPs are positive and provide value to their families and communities. You think its important to provide a role model, I think its important to be home when they are. Difference of opinion, simple as that. But I will not be bullied into silence by people who hate SAHMs for one reason or another.

Posted by: Thursday SAHM | March 29, 2007 9:43 AM | Report abuse

Spelling police - touche!

Posted by: Thursday SAHM | March 29, 2007 9:45 AM | Report abuse

Fo3: You ask some very good questions. I've sent an e-mail to the good folks at G.A.S.P. (http://www.deadlygameschildrenplay.com/en/home.asp) and will post their thoughts when they respond. I'm interested to see what others reading today think about how to talk to kids about these dangers, particularly if you don't suspect they are engaging in the behaviors just yet.

In the meantime, folks, let's get back on topic and avoid bashing each other for our lifestyle choices.

Posted by: Stacey Garfinkle | March 29, 2007 9:58 AM | Report abuse

"Should a parent decribe the dangers of this deathly game to their kids? At what age?"

I looked at the website that Stacey put in her post and they have a victims list. The youngest I saw was 7 but most were 11 and up. You'd have to judge by your own child what is the right age. Kids who have older siblings probably need to hear about it at a younger age.

Posted by: MOMto3 | March 29, 2007 10:19 AM | Report abuse

"In the meantime, folks, let's get back on topic and avoid bashing each other for our lifestyle choices. "

Ha, ha, ha!

Posted by: Anonymous | March 29, 2007 10:24 AM | Report abuse

Again, I come to this forum or On Balance for a sense of community and some ideas to help improve my family's life ... clearly going to the wrong places.
I read a lot of the comments on teh DCUM listserve and they are so much more civil and helpful. I don't understand how two different media with I'm guessing many of the same people (?) could elicit such a different culture.
Suffice it to say, can't we all just get along and ... dare we stick to a topic? PUt insecurities about your own decisions (disguised as snarky comments, of course) aside?
Just a thought.

Posted by: Bad MOm | March 29, 2007 10:49 AM | Report abuse

Maybe I do work for the FBI! You never know!
I would say this board is very hostile to those who make blanket one-sided statements like the very first post of the day.

I totally agree with you that there is nothing wrong with stating that "being a SAHM is a role that is positive and provides value to the family and the community."

This topic is one that affects all families, not just dual income. And right off the bat, it became that arguement.

Posted by: JerseyGirl | March 29, 2007 10:56 AM | Report abuse

Um, he was at boarding school so it is moot if his mother worked out of the home or stayed at home. Either way, she sent him off to boarding school so she had clearly abdicated her responsibilities as a parent to the teachers and staff at the school. Maybe we should ban board schools? (sarcasm on both of the last two sentences)

I want to know why the BBC reported a different cover for the last Potter book. Is it true there will be three covers? One for the adults, one for UK kids and one for US kids?

Posted by: LM inWI | March 29, 2007 10:56 AM | Report abuse

I have heard of this 'game', it came into the news about a year ago, I think. My oldest is 9. I haven't spoken to him about it. I guess because he doesn't spend much time away from me. School, yes. Sports, yes. But, he's not really 'hanging out' with friends yet. At what age do you start talking about stuff like that? Inhalants, OTC drugs - I don't know! We have talked a lot about peer pressure, folliowing your instincts, bullying. But not specific activities. What have you all done?

Posted by: JerseyGirl | March 29, 2007 11:06 AM | Report abuse

" I totally agree with you that there is nothing wrong with stating that "being a SAHM is a role that is positive and provides value to the family and the community."

This topic is one that affects all families, not just dual income. And right off the bat, it became that arguement."

JerseyGirl

Please learn how to spell argument.
SAHM is sexist; SAHP is not.
Didn't see "dual income" in the discussion.

Posted by: Anonymous | March 29, 2007 11:06 AM | Report abuse

Seriously, on topic.

As parents, we have to trust our kids eventually. And frankly, I think parents concentrate on what outside influences (drugs, strangers) could befall our children, not so much on the dangers our kids can do to themselves. I don't think it is productive to say that this mother wasn't paying attention. It is fair to say this was not something she was aware of. It seems to me that her son was being deceptive. How many parents of teens actually KNOW if their teens are still virgins? Are you a bad parent for not knowing the answer to that question? If your kid lies and hides things, are parents supposed to be clarvoiant? This story simply informs us of yet another danger that could happen and that parents should look out for. So, if your kid suddenly starts wearing turtleneck shirts in the middle of the summer, take a look at their neck. Some (especially on this board) may call that being "overly protective", but the line between protection and over-protection seems to be in the opinion of the beholder.

Posted by: LM in WI | March 29, 2007 11:07 AM | Report abuse

I heard on CNN that there will be at least two covers. One for US and one for the UK. I wish the US would just go a long with the UK versions. I don't know why we change them.

Posted by: foamgnome | March 29, 2007 11:09 AM | Report abuse

Its allways fun two sea, that when their is nothing left too argue about, it all comes down to grammer and speling. whatever....

Posted by: JerseyGirl | March 29, 2007 11:10 AM | Report abuse

I agree with LM. Parents can't know everything. How many times have we heard, that the parents were completely in the dark about a kids drinking, drugs, sex or what ever problem. At some point, we have to trust our kids and trust society. But I agree, look for the warning signs. Even when parents do know they can't always do something about it. My friend has a 14 year old niece who allowed guys to take pictures while she had oral sex. The pictures got passed around school. Her parents were horrified. They confronted the girl. Even though they know she is sexually active and makes bad decisions, they could not prevent her from putting up riskie (spelling?) photos of herself up on myspace. They had them taken down right away but a week later other sexy pictures showed back up on myspace.

Posted by: foamgnome | March 29, 2007 11:13 AM | Report abuse

"Its allways fun two sea, that when their is nothing left too argue about, it all comes down to grammer and speling. whatever.... "

No, it's the pompous jerks who get corrected.

You might want to ditch the words "totally" and "whatever" unless you are still in high school and/or living in the '80s.

Posted by: Anonymous | March 29, 2007 11:21 AM | Report abuse

"My friend has a 14 year old niece who allowed guys to take pictures while she had oral sex."

Huh, the parents never discussed this with their daughter? The 14 year old daughter has had oral sex with more than one guy? She lets herself be photographed while doing so?


The ground work to avoid this behavior should have been laid a long time ago!

Posted by: Anonymous | March 29, 2007 11:27 AM | Report abuse

11:27: The scary part of it is they are open parents. They talk to their daughter. But who would think to mention that it is a BAD idea to allow yourself to be photographed doing sex acts. At 14 no less. Sure they talked about where babies come from and her period and stuff. And a bit on morals. But I know until I heard about this stuff, I would not have thought that children would do those kind of things. My point is bad things can happen to good parents.

Posted by: foamgnome | March 29, 2007 11:34 AM | Report abuse

My mother used to read my sister's diary, then beat the crap out of her for what was written in it and when my sister came home from dates. Had to be home by 10:00 on the dot, or she was grounded for good. Mom listened in on all our phone calls. We were expected to be home for dinner every night. Our friends were not allowed in our home (we didn't have many, obviously, with Nazi Mom guarding us). We did not have after-school activities. They put the cabosh on me being in the National Honor Society because it met after school. We did not do sports. It was pretty much a prison situation. None of us was ever injured in any kind of accident except the time when I was 4 and fell off a horse. My father was leading the horse at the time; next day the horse was sold. I put childhood injuries in the category of irresponsible parenting.

Posted by: Anonymous | March 29, 2007 11:47 AM | Report abuse

I mean, why not just sneak some alcohol or smoke weed, like a regular old 16 year old who is looking for a buzz...choking yourself out? For a temporary high?

Dumb a$$ed kids.

Posted by: shocked dad | March 29, 2007 11:53 AM | Report abuse

"By the way to point is moot not mute meaning not debatable instead of unable to speak as 8:53 wrote."

No, a moot point is not undebatable. EVERYTHING is debatable. Something that is moot is not important/doesn't matter.

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/moot
-adjective 1. open to discussion or debate; debatable; doubtful: a moot point.
2. of little or no practical value or meaning; purely academic.

Posted by: to Thursday SAHM | March 29, 2007 11:54 AM | Report abuse

When I was in middle school, a kid died playing this game (or some variant of it). I had never heard of the game but I was told what occurs, I thought "that is the dumbest thing in the world". My parents never taught me about it - they just taught me common sense.

I'm not that worried about my kids doing it.

Posted by: Anonymous | March 29, 2007 11:58 AM | Report abuse

To Anon at 11:47

to follow on foamgnome

Sometimes bad parenting happens to good kids.

Posted by: LM in WI | March 29, 2007 12:01 PM | Report abuse

The only way a SAHP could prevent something like this is by keeping the child in their presence at all times. Are you going to prevent your child from doing homework in their room? Demand that they not leave the kitchen at all while you're cooking? Tell me, are your children only allowed in their rooms to sleep and do you watch them do so?
The point is kids will find privacy somehow; no amount of supervision short of a glass-walled prison will be enough. Educating children is the only way to prevent things like this. Incidentally, I can remember people playing this game at lunch in middle school; we thought it sounded fun and had no idea there was any danger. Thankfully no one was injured.

Posted by: elsa | March 29, 2007 12:09 PM | Report abuse

I remember in 8th grade health class, learning about the different categories of drugs, the book gave examples of hallucinigens, nutmeg being one of them. My mom got very upset about it, her reason was that now every 8th grader was going to try to get high on nutmeg!

So, when is the right time to bring up this kind of stuff? You need to talk about it to educate, but if you bring it up at the wrong time, will you just make them more curious?

And I still think of that class every time I put nutmeg on my rice pudding.

Posted by: JerseyGirl | March 29, 2007 12:20 PM | Report abuse

"The point is kids will find privacy somehow; no amount of supervision short of a glass-walled prison will be enough."

Or, the kids will put up with having no privacy until they're adults, at which point their parents will start wondering why they only see their children once a year.

In all seriousness, when I was a kid, I did NOTHING risky, because the price of getting caught was simply too high. But I left home as soon as I could, and never went back.

My DD is too little right now for us to have to worry about the big risks, but it's a topic that I think about a lot. I'd love to figure out how to keep her safe without exerting the iron control my parents did. I'd love any tips from parents who have been there.

Posted by: NewSAHM | March 29, 2007 12:45 PM | Report abuse

Nutmeg? Cool.

I like the series of US (Schoasltic covers) and this one is very good. The UK adult cover with Slytherin's locket is ok, the kids version is horrid. What are Ron and Hermione doing?

Nutmeg?

Posted by: Fo3 | March 29, 2007 12:56 PM | Report abuse

Scholastic, sry

Posted by: Fo3 | March 29, 2007 12:58 PM | Report abuse

Yes, I too left home at 19 for a Government job and see my mother once a year, if she's lucky. When I do see her she gets out her laundry list of illnesses, aches, pains, who died or is dying, what she had for dinner on Tuesday. She still doesn't believe she did anything wrong raising her kids. Three of us are on anti-depressants. When you're raised that way you think it's a normal situation. I can't believe the lenience and lack of discipline I see in kids today.

Posted by: Anon at 11:47 | March 29, 2007 1:27 PM | Report abuse

"Yes, I too left home at 19 for a Government job and see my mother once a year, if she's lucky."

Your once a year visit qualifies as fulfilling a child's duty to a parent.

Don't waste a single moment on this witch!

Posted by: Anonymous | March 29, 2007 1:31 PM | Report abuse

Fo3, Here's the response from Sharron Grant at DeadlyGamesChildrenPlay.com:

I am not a professional by any means, but I will give my opinion based on what I have seen through the site and my own experience.

There are 2 sides right now as to whether a child should be told or not. I cannot stress that we used to believe the same about, drugs, alcohol and sex education. What they don't know won't hurt them. The problem with this is that they learn from other children and are led to believe that it is perfectly harmless. I am serious when I say that these children believe they are not doing anything that could harm them. This is why it is so important for eduction. There will always be that children that you cannot reach with education but most are unaware of the dangers and therefore will stop when confronted with the facts. Had my son known of the damage to the brain, he would not have tried such a dangerous activity. In the Provinces and States that are giving presentations for awareness, the schools are educating children from grades 3 through 12. We have had children as young as 6 fall victim to asphyxia activities.

Posted by: Stacey Garfinkle | March 29, 2007 1:45 PM | Report abuse

Kids trust to luck more than good sense. That is as old as humanity, sadly. I don't think that any of us would make it to adulthood without SOME luck coming into play.

I guess it'll be yet another little discussion though. Hey, honey, asphyxiation isn't fun & games. If someone put the rope around your neck and pulled, it's attempted murder. This falls under the same rubric as huffing.

An adult playing these same stupid game is trying to win a Darwin Award. Kids doing it are simply being kids. Ugh.

I am SO looking forward to the Harry Potter book!

Posted by: Anonymous | March 29, 2007 2:05 PM | Report abuse

One of my favorite sayings is that "Children do exactly the same things that adults do, they just don't hide it as well"

LM in WI said it beautifully and I will only restate that there is no way to prevent humans from doing things to themselves. Even if legally and financially they are dependents.

What we can and should do is raise them to be mature, KNOW them as people with their own unique lives and perspectives, and make them as educated as possible.

With frequent check ins on the phone and in their room.

Posted by: Liz D | March 29, 2007 2:24 PM | Report abuse

Sounds like some of the kids are acting on a Death Wish or making a big, fat cry for help to their parents.

Posted by: Anonymous | March 29, 2007 3:11 PM | Report abuse

To NewSAHM;
Encourage your kids to be allowed to be open with you without judgement. When they ask questions, answer them as honestly as you can in an age appropriate way. If you don't know the answers, tell them so but find the answers and get back to them. I also use kids like this as an example to my kids as to the harm this kind of behavior can do to them. This boy was on the Today Show this AM. Even though we didn't see the full report, we saw the intro. This gave us a good topic to talk about on the way to school. When I see a news report about a kid getting killed in a car crash or something equally tragic, we talk about it - not in a preachy way.

Also, encourage your kids' friends to come to your house to socialize. You don't have to watch them every second that they are there but you will know who your kids are hanging out with and generally what they are up to. My parents did that for my sisters and I and it worked out great. Give your kids a safe, nonjudgemental place to come home to.

Posted by: MDMom | March 29, 2007 3:14 PM | Report abuse

There's something fishy about this story.

What the heck was Levi's mom doing in his boarding school dorm room?

Posted by: Kathy | March 29, 2007 3:14 PM | Report abuse

Thanks, 1:31: In thirteen years, my mother has been to my house only once. It started to rain and she had to leave quickly to get home. I am expected to go to her house to visit. You see, it's a shorter distance from my house to hers.

Posted by: Anon at 11:47 | March 29, 2007 3:39 PM | Report abuse

Thanks for the tips, MDmom.

Posted by: NewSAHM | March 29, 2007 7:13 PM | Report abuse

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