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Food Fear

Apparently, it's not just me who's noticed: More kids these days are being diagnosed with food allergies. According to Sally Squires's Lean Plate Club column today, 8 percent of kids aged 2 and younger have a food allergy. Some will outgrow them, some won't. In 2003, a leading allergy specialist, Robert A. Wood of Johns Hopkins University attributed 90 percent of food allergies to eight food types: milk, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts, fish, shellfish, soy and wheat.

Fear of food keeps parents of allergic kids on guard all the time. Go to a friend's house to play and keep others' food away from the kids. Go to a birthday party and bring your own cupcake. Restaurant dining is nearly impossible for parents who can't guarantee the allergen cleanliness of the kitchen and every ingredient that is in the food that gets put on the table. They must read every label carefully for allergens, both written clearly and hidden. For instance, did you know "casein" is dairy? And even then, keep an eye out on the Food and Drug Administration recall list for unlisted allergens on labels.

The health risks associated with allergies can make it difficult for a parent to let go of necessary watchfulness over a child -- which is, of course, a part of sending your kids to school.

So, it was a surprise several weeks ago when I read that many schools don't allow severely allergic kids to carry the lifesaving medicine they need with them. The American Medical Association voted to lobby for laws allowing these children to bring medicines, such as injectable epinephrine, to school.

What experiences do you have with allergies and kids? What can be done to help make their lives a little easier?

By Stacey Garfinkle |  July 10, 2007; 8:00 AM ET  | Category:  Babies , Elementary Schoolers , Preschoolers , Teens , Tweens
Previous: Life's Small -- and Big -- Lessons | Next: Milestones Gone By the Wayside

Comments


I suspect it's a safety issue -- so that kids don't OD themselves, or they don't do something really stupid like taking their epinephrine needle and attacking another child (not saying this is *likely,* but how fast would a victim's parent sue the school over allowing another kid to have it?). IIRC insulin ends up falling under the same category (but that may have depended on the kind of diabetes, friend of mine had it but I don't remember which type and that may have made a difference).

I'm not sure how I feel about kids not being able to carry any medicines whatsoever (the case when I attended Montgomery Co. schools, this may have changed, and if someone needed a regular dose of something they could let the health room nurse administer it with special paperwork and permission from the parent), but I can also see why it's a blanket policy both ways -- if little Jimmy can have his epinephrine, why can't little Sally have her Benadryl, for instance? Someone is bound to make that argument and sue the school over it, so that's where we are, for good or ill.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 10, 2007 8:17 AM | Report abuse

My son (4 1/2) has a tree nut allergy and has an epi pen prescribed. We've taught him to be just as diligent as we are about asking someone "does that have nuts in it"? In fact, he sometimes asks ME if what I'm giving him has nuts. Makes me laugh, but with pride.

I don't know about the medication thing. Interested to hear the comments today.

Posted by: WorkingMomX | July 10, 2007 8:49 AM | Report abuse

Incidentally, it's not just kids who are diagnosed with food allergies. A friend of my parents was diagnosed with celiac disease when he was in his fifties. It was bad enough that his school district had him go out on disability, which then converted over to early retirement when he reached 55. A proper diagnosis helped considerably, of course! His life has improved a great deal since eliminating gluten from his life.

Posted by: Murphy | July 10, 2007 9:00 AM | Report abuse

yes, we frequently are fearful about our little one. School has been great--peanut free rooms, epi-pen allowed, but that is daycare and I do not know how regular school will go.
Halloween is harrowing--how do you get all the peanut out of the bag without totally ruining the experience. How can you be sure that a trace is not left?
It also changes all of your own eating practices--a small sacrifice for her health, but it makes you conscious of everything you put in your mouth.

Posted by: sunniday | July 10, 2007 9:14 AM | Report abuse

My 3.5-year old daughter's dairy allergy is quite severe; our allergist requires us to carry two epipens with us. My best advice to others with dairy allergies is to become educated on the Jewish dietary laws and their associated labeling. We are not Jewish, but the practice is to not mix foods that contain meat with those that contain dairy. I still read ingredients, but it gives me an extra sense of security.

Restaurants. Now that my daughter's getting older, she's much more aware of the restaurant concept. Yes it is scary and yes she had a "moderate" reaction at one two-years ago during her first restaurant meal. At the lower end, our "regular" restaurant is "Pollo a la Brasca" in Arlington. It's one of those roasted chicken places. Chicken and yucca is Claudia's version of fast food.

At the other end of the spectrum, we ate last weekend at Willow in Arlington. Key to my comfort level is confidence that what is being communicated with the server makes it to the kitchen. I think the "finer" restaurants and their staff are more attuned to this practice. Great meal, great service and even a tour of the kitchen to say hi to "lady chef".

School scares me a bit, but the older Claudia gets, the more she understands her allergy and how important it is to not eat food from others. I recently bought "Cody the Allergic Cow", a picture-book by Nicole Smith. She now talks a lot about how she and Cody have the same allergy.

Anyway, my two-cents. Good luck.

Posted by: Ed Scerbo | July 10, 2007 9:27 AM | Report abuse

I bet these kids with allergies weren't breast fed!

Posted by: M.M. | July 10, 2007 9:40 AM | Report abuse

Actually I know several adults and children with life-threatening food allergies who WERE breast-fed.

Meanwhile, my formula-fed kids aren't allergic to anything.

Not that these observations add up to anything. But it puts the snarky, formula-is-responsible-for-everything-bad comments in perspective.

Posted by: to m.m. | July 10, 2007 9:47 AM | Report abuse

I hope that comment about breastfeeding was a joke. The kids I know with the worst allergies are 5 siblings who all have wheat and poultry allergies. They were also all breastfed, so whatever is going on, that isn't it.

Posted by: MECM | July 10, 2007 9:48 AM | Report abuse

That breastfeeding comment was totally ignorant. It's very common for allergens to be transferred by the mother to the child through breast milk.

Ask any mother who had to stop eating wheat completely or stop breastfeeding in order to get their child to quit screaming in pain.

Regarding the epipen, why can't the pen be left in the nurse's office? That's what kids who are allergic to bee stings do.

Posted by: Bob | July 10, 2007 9:55 AM | Report abuse

Soy allergy is a terrible thing. It seems like it is in everything. The same goes for gluten. A good friend of mine in University was alergic to both. To say the least she cooked essentially all her own meals.

If I had to hazard a guess on the causes of allergies, I would actually say that the cause is more the changes in what we are eating. There is more exposure to different kinds of food in the global market and particularly the foods listed find their way into a lot of processed foods.

Posted by: David S | July 10, 2007 9:57 AM | Report abuse

My son was allergic to milk for the first two years or so. His cousin was lactose intolerant. So at times we would have 5 different kinds of milk in the fridge - lowfat, skim, lactaid, soy, half and half. He's over it now, but of course still likes the soy milk better. Hopefully this will not make him the "weird" kid at school. Now our one year old drinks whole milk, so one more milk to the fridge. I'm thinking about getting a milk fridge.

I really wonder what is causing the increase in food allergies.

Posted by: Cliff | July 10, 2007 10:18 AM | Report abuse

In Sally Squire's column, there is a reference to people using too many antibiotic cleansers and being too paranoid about germs...when I was young we all played outside in the dirt, and I cannot recall a single classmate who had an allergy. I do have to wonder if this has something to do with it...

Posted by: Me | July 10, 2007 10:24 AM | Report abuse

High-fructose corn syrup is another issue. Corn and corn by-products are in a vast majority of processed foods, high fructose corn syrup is a popular sweetner here in the States, but long term effects (such as fructose intolerance) are cropping up with increasing regularity. This could be attributed to overexposure, and a lack of understanding of long term usage of these products.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 10, 2007 10:37 AM | Report abuse

I was breastfed, played outside in the dirt, never was around anti-bacterial anything, and I still managed to develop an allergy to sesame in my teens. Neither of my parents has a food allergy, nor do any siblings or cousins.

I do have other auto-immune problems (IBS, dysautonomia)so I suspect my body's immune system is just overzealous. I am eagerly waiting for genetic engineering to come up with a cure because I'm sick of carrying Benedryl and my EpiPen everywhere I go!

Posted by: Caroline | July 10, 2007 10:39 AM | Report abuse

In reference to the comment from "me", I know my sister is a bit anal about the house cleaning and germs and 2 of her 4 kids have the extreme allergies (all 4 were breast fed). They also have never had pets either. I am way more relaxed about the cleaning and have a dog and 2 cats and neither of my 2 kids have any allergies. If genetics were considered, we are children of a father that has a severe egg allergy too.

I really believe that there is something to the idea of how clean obsessed we have become.

Posted by: MDMom | July 10, 2007 10:40 AM | Report abuse

Yes, interesting to hear that breast fed kids have allergies..... breast fed doesn't necessarily equate to perfectly healthy kids as many have advocated on other blog sessions. My kids were formula fed.

Posted by: M.M. | July 10, 2007 10:44 AM | Report abuse

I know a woman who has terrible food allergies to a variety of foods (honey, tomatoes, peppers, etc.) and my father-in-law recently went for an allergy test and came up allergic to, among many other things, celery and potatoes. And then there's MIL with her peanut allergy...

The aforementioned woman's theory is that folks of her and my FIL's age (50-ish) are the first generation to have eaten significant quantities of processed, packaged, preservative-laden food and that that's the reason why suddenly adults of their age and subsequent generations are developing these allergies. I think she may be onto something...

Posted by: Anonymous | July 10, 2007 11:16 AM | Report abuse

My son is allergic to peanuts, tree nuts and sesame. He was breastfed.

As for the cleanliness issue, the issue is not so much how clean our houses are but how clean our society is. You don't see these kinds of allergy rates in third world countries where people's immune systems are battling parasites. Our boies are trigger loaded to fight these kinds of dangers and when they don't have anything to attack, they just find something.

So, it's not a matter of whether kids play in the dirt. It's more a by product of the eradication of really dangerous bacteria and parasites from our everyday lives. At least this is the theory as I've read in multiple allergy books and as described to me by my allergist.

Posted by: Robyn | July 10, 2007 11:25 AM | Report abuse

My oldest son is allergic to peanuts, has seasonal allergies and asthma. He was not breastfed.

My younger son is allergic to peanuts, has seasonal allergies and asthma....his is much worse than his older brothers. He was breastfed for about six weeks. His twin sister has no allergies and no asthma. She was breastfed for the first six weeks also.

We carry benadryl and epi-pens everywhere we go. They have epi-pens at preschool that are kept in the classroom easily accessible to teachers but not students.

My oldest will attend kindergarten this fall. We chose a private school for him and one of the reasons was that the school is peanut free and that the principal, staff, nurse, etc. all recognize that fast access to an epi-pen is critical to the safety of allergic children. The nurse will keep the epi-pen for him and her office is next to the cafeteria.

We do bring our own cupcakes to birthday parties, we put signs on our children at parties so that people won't give them any food, we talk to our kids continuously about asking what is in food before they eat it.

We have had people we don't know very well offer our kids cupcakes, nutter butters and even tell them that it is okay to eat a peanut butter sandwich as long as they scrape most of the peanut butter off. It seems that many people are still in denial about the severity of food allergies.

We have also met many people who have taken the time to understand food allergies and we appreciate the support from them.

Posted by: Mom to 3 | July 10, 2007 11:58 AM | Report abuse

Regarding medications in the schools -

My kids don't have allergies, but when I helped out on a field trip, one of the kids in my group had allergies and I was given an epipen by her teacher. The teacher keeps it in the classroom, not the nurses office.

I am assuming that if the epipen is needed, there is usually not enough time to get to the nurse and back? Whereas benedryl and the like are not used in such life threatening situations.

Posted by: prarie dog | July 10, 2007 12:01 PM | Report abuse

Wow - there are entire schools that are peanut free? Had no idea things were that bad. Definitely a good idea for the kids with the most severe allergies.

Posted by: Me | July 10, 2007 12:50 PM | Report abuse

My 25 yo brother has a very severe peanut allergy and less severe allergies to a bunch of other things (dairy, apples, etc). All through school the nurse's office had his epipen, which he thankfully never had to use. He has always been a good advocate for himself and has stuck to safe foods. This caution, though, has carried over to him not being very adventurous in other realms of his life. The bigger problem for him is that since he became an "adult" he has been much less diligent about keeping his prescription current and carrying his epipen with him. We're thankful that he's now married (under new management) and his wife has a vested interest in his continued health.

Posted by: ML in Mpls | July 10, 2007 12:57 PM | Report abuse

I am a former peanut allergy person, with a slew of other allergies, and asthma. My daughter (breast fed for 4 days only) is fine. I have been working to eat "real" food, and boosting my immune system through organic whole-food supplements, and the sources of my food. I would never drink any dairy products that are sold in a grocery store - the pastuerization process kills off the good stuff that helps digestion. The end result? I'm no longer taking singulair, rhinocort aqua, the purple discus that I can't even remember the name now, or the other pink allergy tablets that everyone takes. I'm off all my drugs - with my pulmonologists blessing. My allergist is less impressed, though I've asked her to retest me - and my peanut allergy is now gone. I am still on allergy shots (3/every other week).

I firmly believe we're dealing with the fallout of processed food. It is not only not giving you what you need, but it's hurting you. Someone else earlier mentioned the processed food connection - and I totally agree.

My daughter has done her later growing up eating what I consider healthy foods. She hates school lunches - brings her own. Her friends tease her a little, but they think it's cool. I'm thrilled that she thinks about what's going into her mouth.

By the way - the general rule of thumb in our house is to check the list of ingredients. The longer it is, the worse it is for you.

Happy eathing to all. :)

Posted by: Trying to eat healthy | July 10, 2007 1:14 PM | Report abuse

Hi WORKINGMOMX, Congrats on your blog entry.

Posted by: pATRICK | July 10, 2007 1:18 PM | Report abuse

We're thankful that he's now married (under new management) and his wife has a vested interest in his continued health.

Posted by: ML in Mpls | July 10, 2007 12:57 PM

My ex would have called that "controlling". But I'm glad some people see it as being a good wife and looking out for their spouse.

Posted by: M.M. | July 10, 2007 1:19 PM | Report abuse

My 2.5 year old is allergic to wheat and eggs. She was breastfed until she was 2, plays in the dirt, and eats almost no processed foods (she can't- it all has wheat in it!).

It turns out that my MIL also had a bunch of food allergies as a child which she later outgrew. it's just genetics in many cases.

Anyway, the wheat allergy is a real pain. When she was younger playgroups were virtually ruled out, because there were always crumbs all over the floor and she was too quick to put things in her mouth when I was on the other side of the room or just looking the other way. Now she understands better that certain foods will give her "bad itchies," so things are a little easier.

I'm very nervous about preschool, though, since kids are apt to share snacks and many arts and crafts materials contain wheat (which she can't get on her hands).

Posted by: va | July 10, 2007 1:31 PM | Report abuse

I agree with the processed food thing. Also, I think we are well more aware of things, and years ago, kids just weren't diagnosed with some allergies that they are today - my friend just turned 40 and it was only a few years ago she was diagnosed with celiac. And an allergy to milk.

So, the life threatening allergies aside - I think just as we are 'seeing' more autistic spectrum kids - we are 'seeing' more allergies. Part of it is that we're looking for it.

Posted by: atlmom | July 10, 2007 1:32 PM | Report abuse

"By the way - the general rule of thumb in our house is to check the list of ingredients. The longer it is, the worse it is for you.

Happy eathing to all. :)"

Good advice - I have to add that if there are more than five things you can't pronounce, forget it!

Posted by: Me | July 10, 2007 1:37 PM | Report abuse

yeah, I've started to try to reduce the amount of sugar in our diet. So I said: okay, I'll buy breakfast cereal with little sugar. It is SO HARD to find a cereal that has sugar as the third or later ingredient.

Like, CORN FLAKES has sugar listed as the second ingredient. *sigh*

Posted by: atlmom | July 10, 2007 1:40 PM | Report abuse

Oh, I just saw that the OP asked what can be done to make life easier for families of kids with allergies. One (very) good friend used to vacuum her living room before I brought my toddler over to play, which really meant a lot to me. She also made sure that she offered her DD snacks that my DD could share when they were together, so that my DD wouldn't feel left out or deprived. It was really awfully nice of her, and it made playdates so much more relaxing and fun for everyone.

Posted by: va | July 10, 2007 1:51 PM | Report abuse

Like everything, I want us to focus on stopping the allergies before they start, rather than a constant lifelong management problem.

It's hard to say- our family tends to be not happy with milk products at a young age, but otherwise no allergies or issues at all. But then we all die of cancer or heart disease by the time we're 60.

I agree that good foods and getting kids EXPOSED to basic germs on a regular basis is best for making sure the systems stay in good shape.

Posted by: Liz D | July 10, 2007 1:54 PM | Report abuse

Liz D: right on! An endorsement for not keeping the house clean. I'm right there on that boat!

Seriously, there are good bacteria, but we're killing the good with the bad with all this antibacterial stuff.

Posted by: atlmom | July 10, 2007 1:57 PM | Report abuse

I do not have a child with an allergy. Actually, this is not even a food allergy, I am just curious if anyone else has had this problem. I discovered my first allergy with a child sunscreen product. Any one use the sunscreen (I cannot remember the brand name) that goes on purple and dries clear? The first time I used it, my child was fine, but I was not. After applying it, I washed my hands, and within 5 minutes my hands swelled up to quite a scary point (think bear paws). I had to take Benedryl and call the doctor. I was a little disturbed because I had never had an allergic reaction to anything before in my life. Not sure exactly what in the sunscreen caused the reaction, but needless to say, I do not use it anymore.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 10, 2007 2:15 PM | Report abuse

Hi, pATRICK -- I'm not sure you should be offering congrats. Maybe condolences?

We miss you over there, BTW!!

Posted by: WorkingMomX | July 10, 2007 2:19 PM | Report abuse

"Hi, pATRICK -- I'm not sure you should be offering congrats. Maybe condolences?

We miss you over there, BTW!!"

HaHa, I admire YOUR courage, hang in there!

Posted by: pATRICK | July 10, 2007 2:32 PM | Report abuse

>>Also, I think we are well more aware of things, and years ago, kids just weren't diagnosed with some allergies that they are today - my friend just turned 40 and it was only a few years ago she was diagnosed with celiac.

She may not have been an active celiac until a few years ago, atlmom. Celiac disease, like allergies, is something that can 'pop up' later in life. My husband ate bread, pizza, pasta, cereal, and other gluteny foods with no trouble until his late 20s when he got suddenly and mysteriously ill. After wasting away to near-skeletal proportions, he was finally diagnosed with celiac sprue. Likewise, people can develop dairy, nut, and other food, environmental, and chemical allergies at any point in their life.

While you are probably right that some of the new cases are the result of improved diagnostics, I do think we are seeing a greater number of allergy cases in an absolute sense. I suspect a lot of it is environmental -- so many artificial chemicals not just in our food, but in our houses, yards, offices, everywhere.

Posted by: Northern Girl | July 10, 2007 2:42 PM | Report abuse

"So I said: okay, I'll buy breakfast cereal with little sugar. It is SO HARD to find a cereal that has sugar as the third or later ingredient."

atlmom, the reason most cereal has 1 or 2 grams of sugar per serving, is that if it didn't it would taste like WOOD.

You have about 3 alternatives - Post shredded wheat, Arrowhead Mills puffed rice, Arrowhead Mills puffed wheat. As for how those taste...see WOOD comment above.

Posted by: sweetness | July 10, 2007 2:42 PM | Report abuse

I am deathly allergic to all tree nuts. I was diagnosed as a junior in high school. I graduated from a Fairfax County high school in the mid 1990s.

The problem with not allowing the epipen is not with elementary school students, who are generally at school while the nurse is there, but with high school students. My parents and I were told that I was under no circumstances allowed to have an epipen on my person, or I would be expelled. This was a problem because I was usually at school for gymnastics, cheerleading and yearbook until 10:00 pm most nights. Not to mention traveling to other schools for games and meets. Obviously, the nurse was only at my school during school hours.

My worst reaction was when I was a junior, cheerleading at a football game at another school. Our sponsor had given us cookies that had ground up nuts in them, and I had no way of knowing. I got hives, and my throat started to swell and close. This was before I had been to an allergist (and the incident that prompted the allergist appt.) Luckily, a mother of one of the football players had benadryl in the stands. I took that and was back to cheering by the 2nd quarter.

After we were told that I couldn't carry an epipen, (or even benadryl) my mother and I decided that my health was more important, and we lied. I carried benadryl and my epipen in my backpack at all times. I could have been expelled for this, but when it's a life or death situation, we figured it was best to be alive and expelled than dead.

Of course, I was never caught. No one ever knew that I had these medications, and we never told anyone.

Posted by: E | July 10, 2007 2:47 PM | Report abuse

Our kids went to a peanut-free preschool, which at first I found to be a bit crazy, but I grew to appreciate that the parents of the allergic kids, and obviously the kids themselves, had a real risk to deal with. We talk all the time about how much more common it seems these days for kids to have allergies. I agree that it must be a mixture of environmental factors, processed foods, and over-sanitizing our food, houses, and selves. I'm sure it's being diagnosed more frequently also, but I don't think that explains the drastic increase in the last decade or so of these allergies.

Posted by: LL | July 10, 2007 2:58 PM | Report abuse

I think the more people are educated about food allergies, the better! And let's keep pushing our schools and politicians to allow students to carry epi-pens. It is NOT like carrying around some sort of addictive drug - it is adrenaline that can save a child's life and must be administered ASAP.

Posted by: R | July 10, 2007 3:06 PM | Report abuse

E-
I think a LOT of high school students carry illegal medications with them. When I was in HS, all the girls I knew usually had midol or advil on them pretty much all the time. And, of course, what 16-year old is going to take a bottle of antibiotics to the nurse's office to be "supervised" while finishing up a course of medication?

It was something I particularly hated about high school... being treated like I was too stupid to manage my health or cross the street alone. Or to know whether or not I REALLY had to go to the bathroom.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 10, 2007 3:44 PM | Report abuse

Maybe allergies have to do with wealth. We were dirt poor and none of us is allergic to anything. Healthy as the day is long. I always thought only rich wussies had allergies. One classmate's mother would come to school with a thermometer and take his temperature a couple times a day. Pathetic.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 10, 2007 3:56 PM | Report abuse

I breast fed both of my kids for 15 months each. One has a bad peanut allergy and the other doesn't. I am also not a fanatic about the germs thing, so they did not have the "antiseptic" house. Some of my little one's issues are innate and inherited--a lot of atopy on both sides of the family. Hopefully, she will grow out of it. And I plan on having the epi-pen with her--and deal with the other consequences.

Posted by: Sunniday | July 10, 2007 4:13 PM | Report abuse

A good friend of mine has peanut allergies - on the "so allergic it's ridiculous" scale. Open a jar of peanuts around him and the dust will make his throat start to close up.

The reason that young kids' epi pens need to be kept in the classrooms and older kids need to be allowed to keep their epi pens is simple: anaphylactic shock is an EMERGENCY, and in a serious case even seconds count. It's not that the kid is getting itchy - the kid's throat is closing and he can't breathe. (You're worried that the kid will use it as a weapon? OK, so if they do, then expel them. I suspect it's less dangerous than a pair of scissors or a metal protractor, though.)

People think "Oh, it only takes a couple of minutes to get the medicine from the nurse's office, right?" Well, think about it. My high school was relatively small for Fairfax County - 1600 kids - and from some of the furthest points at a dead run it would probably take 2 minutes to get to the nurse's office. There are stairs, slippery floors, and I'm not even counting the fact that the kid could be out on an athletic field. Now say 30 seconds, if the nurse is in the office, to find the pen, grab it, and give it back - then another 2 minutes to run back. That's probably 5 minutes from when the reaction started. Try to gasp for 3 minutes, then hold your breath for another 2. Not comfy.

I was appalled (still am) at how cavalier people get about allergies - just because their allergies aren't bad, they seem to assume everybody with bad allergies is faking it or should just get over it somehow. (Not specifically aimed at anyone here, just in general.) I've heard variations on "just pick the other nuts out," "oh, a little won't hurt him!" and "can't he just take a Benadryl?" more than once. A lot of folks don't seem to realize that for a few unlucky people this is life or death.

Oh, and to Trying to eat Healthy: I'm glad that your routine is working for you. Seriously. But while overprocessed foods aren't great, a little processing - like paesturizing milk - can be a great thing. We have far fewer babies dying from foodborne gut infections and diarrhea now, for instance. You can get good gut bacteria from yogurt, too. I agree that society has gotten far too Clorox-happy, but I think a knee-jerk reaction back to the far end of the spectrum is a bad thing too. And I can't help but think that the five-ingredient rule is a little limiting - you couldn't eat my cherry pie, for instance. (Flour, butter, shortening or lard, salt, sugar, cherries, starch, almond extract and sometimes lemon juice or vanilla.) Mind you, with the butter and sugar I can't eat it that often either....but to skip it entirely would be tragic! :-)

Posted by: Three of Five | July 11, 2007 11:16 AM | Report abuse

My 22-month-old (exclusively breastfed for 8 months, still nursing now) is allergic to soy, wheat, peanuts, dairy, garlic, onion, peas, and white potatoes, plus other environmental things. Peanuts are a particular danger; we carry a twinject everywhere we go and have needed it in the past. I am allergic to fish and my husband has severe seasonal/pet/dust mite allergies and asthma. Also, I have a family history of various autoimmune disorders. So it's no wonder that our son has allergies too.

In former times, these things wouldn't have been able to survive in the gene pool. My husband would have died long ago from an asthma attack, and my mother wouldn't have been able to have children so I wouldn't be here either. Thanks to medical advances, though, here we all are. I believe the genetic explanation makes more sense than whether a kid is breastfed or he plays in the dirt.

Also, we eat fewer varieties of foods than our great-grandparents did. Makes sense that with more exposure, we'll see more allergy to those foods.

Great topic! We have been on a wild ride so far with this allergy thing, but it helps that we're not alone.

Posted by: AL mom | July 13, 2007 11:35 AM | Report abuse

Hi! Yes it concerns me that allergies are on the rise and that schools have policies to place Epi-pens away from children.

I am eating a lot of crow for teasing a co-worker 12 years ago that it was absurd that a little peanut could kill him. That demonstrates my level of ignorance back then.

We have had a dog and I'm not a meticulous housekeeper. I breastfed my youngest for almost 2 years. He's a poster child for food allergies with anaphylaxis to milk, eggs, corn, peanuts, tree nuts, and sesame. Most recently, we discovered an allergy to white potatoes. My older two children have environmental allergies and one of the two outgrew an allergy to egg.

I think that there's something environmental and genetic happening to our children as well. I am grateful for modern medicine. I am grateful for epi-pens and had to use my youngest's on him when someone inadvertently gave him some milk to drink.

After a 4 hour ambulance ride,hospital visit/IV/and medicines to control bi-phasic reactions, I see a need to support the AMA decision to allow epi-pens in school.

Like other parents, we're grateful that we're not alone on "this wild ride." Meanwhile, every trip we take, whether by air or car or to a restaurant, is fraught with some level of fear over his inadvertent exposure to one of his allergens.

Posted by: Mom2allergykids | July 13, 2007 6:48 PM | Report abuse

because in a large school with trailers when the nurse may be at lunch, you really want to have a student running for an epi pen when MINUTES are keeping your kid from dying. That's just horrible.

Then again when I was in high school it was not uncommon for people to go to drug rehab for bottles of IB Profin in their backpacks.

Considering that when I taught my cell phone didn't work in my classroom, and that I didn't get a phone until my second year of teaching, that's a certain death for a kid. I can't understand why every parent with a kid with severe allergies isn't suing right now. I know I would have been. Asthma inhalers were on the kids, why isn't this allowed?

-l.

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Gay couples should be, should not be allowed to marry

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alguem sabe me dizer se e possivel rotacionar uma imagem com angulo de 30?, 45?, ... (em css, javascript, sei la, qualquer

Posted by: sailing boat in sale | August 9, 2007 4:06 PM | Report abuse

I've pretty much been doing nothing worth mentioning. I haven't gotten anything done today. I haven't been up to much , but oh well. I've just been staying at home waiting for something to happen, but so it goes. Pfft.

Posted by: boat house new sale | August 9, 2007 4:41 PM | Report abuse

Genetic testing on unborn children is, is not ethical

Posted by: catalina sail boat part | August 9, 2007 4:49 PM | Report abuse

Males should be allowed to go shirtless at home only - Or vary with places for another persuasive speech topic

Posted by: beer boot german warsteiner | August 10, 2007 11:17 PM | Report abuse

I haven't gotten much done recently. I don't care. My life's been basically boring these days. Whatever. More or less nothing exciting going on lately, but pfft.

Posted by: beer clincher de | August 10, 2007 11:50 PM | Report abuse

Restrict every household to 60 gallon can on trash a week

Posted by: wisconsin beer label | August 10, 2007 11:58 PM | Report abuse

I can't be bothered with anything lately. Such is life. Basically nothing seems worth thinking about. I've just been staying at home not getting anything done. I haven't been up to anything today, but oh well. I haven't gotten much done lately.

Posted by: candy sample clip | August 13, 2007 11:13 AM | Report abuse

Drivers who run red lights should be punished severly

Posted by: sexy eye candy | August 13, 2007 11:57 AM | Report abuse

I haven't been up to much recently, but whatever. I just don't have much to say lately. Basically nothing happening to speak of. So it goes. My mind is like a complete blank. Such is life.

Posted by: candy penny wholesale | August 13, 2007 12:04 PM | Report abuse

I feel like a fog, not that it matters. I've pretty much been doing nothing , but eh. Today was a loss. I haven't gotten much done for a while.

Posted by: vinyl tote bag | August 14, 2007 11:28 AM | Report abuse

I feel like a fog, not that it matters. I've pretty much been doing nothing , but eh. Today was a loss. I haven't gotten much done for a while.

Posted by: vinyl tote bag | August 14, 2007 11:57 AM | Report abuse

I feel like a fog, not that it matters. I've pretty much been doing nothing , but eh. Today was a loss. I haven't gotten much done for a while.

Posted by: vinyl tote bag | August 14, 2007 12:02 PM | Report abuse

More or less nothing seems important. I've just been letting everything happen without me recently. I can't be bothered with anything recently, but such is life. My life's been generally bland today. Not much on my mind these days, but eh.

Posted by: zoe met art | August 15, 2007 9:31 AM | Report abuse

More or less nothing seems important. I've just been letting everything happen without me recently. I can't be bothered with anything recently, but such is life. My life's been generally bland today. Not much on my mind these days, but eh.

Posted by: zoe met art | August 15, 2007 10:15 AM | Report abuse

More or less nothing seems important. I've just been letting everything happen without me recently. I can't be bothered with anything recently, but such is life. My life's been generally bland today. Not much on my mind these days, but eh.

Posted by: zoe met art | August 15, 2007 10:20 AM | Report abuse

I can't be bothered with anything recently. I've just been sitting around doing nothing. Today was a loss. I just don't have much to say. Nothing seems worth thinking about.

Posted by: cat suit pic | August 16, 2007 1:34 PM | Report abuse

I can't be bothered with anything recently. I've just been sitting around doing nothing. Today was a loss. I just don't have much to say. Nothing seems worth thinking about.

Posted by: cat suit pic | August 16, 2007 2:26 PM | Report abuse

Live with your lover before getting married

Posted by: designer kid bedroom | August 19, 2007 4:25 AM | Report abuse

Live with your lover before getting married

Posted by: designer kid bedroom | August 19, 2007 4:54 AM | Report abuse

Live with your lover before getting married

Posted by: designer kid bedroom | August 19, 2007 4:59 AM | Report abuse

Americans owe, doesn't owe Vietnam veterans an apology

Posted by: college ellis online | August 20, 2007 6:55 AM | Report abuse

Americans owe, doesn't owe Vietnam veterans an apology

Posted by: college ellis online | August 20, 2007 7:26 AM | Report abuse

Americans owe, doesn't owe Vietnam veterans an apology

Posted by: college ellis online | August 20, 2007 7:34 AM | Report abuse

Males should be allowed to go shirtless at home only - Or vary with places for another persuasive speech topic

Posted by: homer simpsons dad | August 21, 2007 9:19 AM | Report abuse

Males should be allowed to go shirtless at home only - Or vary with places for another persuasive speech topic

Posted by: homer simpsons dad | August 21, 2007 9:47 AM | Report abuse

Males should be allowed to go shirtless at home only - Or vary with places for another persuasive speech topic

Posted by: homer simpsons dad | August 21, 2007 9:54 AM | Report abuse

We are killing the rainforest

Posted by: ford detroit locker | August 22, 2007 8:12 AM | Report abuse

We are killing the rainforest

Posted by: ford detroit locker | August 22, 2007 8:33 AM | Report abuse

We are killing the rainforest

Posted by: ford detroit locker | August 22, 2007 8:37 AM | Report abuse

Blame the parents of a murderer parents for the crime

Posted by: archive florida lottery | August 23, 2007 12:06 PM | Report abuse

Blame the parents of a murderer parents for the crime

Posted by: archive florida lottery | August 23, 2007 12:44 PM | Report abuse

Blame the parents of a murderer parents for the crime

Posted by: archive florida lottery | August 23, 2007 1:07 PM | Report abuse

Posted by: Rx Prices | August 23, 2007 2:38 PM | Report abuse

Children in ... fill in the nation of your choice ... are living better

Posted by: casino gambling guide | August 24, 2007 2:28 PM | Report abuse

Children in ... fill in the nation of your choice ... are living better

Posted by: casino gambling guide | August 24, 2007 3:05 PM | Report abuse

Children in ... fill in the nation of your choice ... are living better

Posted by: casino gambling guide | August 24, 2007 3:14 PM | Report abuse

Sex offenders should be, should not be castrated

Posted by: bed frame poster | August 25, 2007 10:39 AM | Report abuse

Sex offenders should be, should not be castrated

Posted by: bed frame poster | August 25, 2007 11:07 AM | Report abuse

Sex offenders should be, should not be castrated

Posted by: bed frame poster | August 25, 2007 11:12 AM | Report abuse

Help the homeless down the street and persuade them to look for work

Posted by: antique auto glass | August 26, 2007 4:31 AM | Report abuse

Help the homeless down the street and persuade them to look for work

Posted by: antique auto glass | August 26, 2007 4:51 AM | Report abuse

Help the homeless down the street and persuade them to look for work

Posted by: antique auto glass | August 26, 2007 4:53 AM | Report abuse

An integrated, segregated society is better

Posted by: dealer discount tire | August 26, 2007 10:10 PM | Report abuse

An integrated, segregated society is better

Posted by: dealer discount tire | August 26, 2007 10:29 PM | Report abuse

An integrated, segregated society is better

Posted by: dealer discount tire | August 26, 2007 10:34 PM | Report abuse

Not much on my mind worth mentioning. What can I say? My life's been generally dull today. I've just been letting everything pass me by recently.

Posted by: 7 dvd inch player portable | August 27, 2007 12:45 PM | Report abuse

More or less nothing seems important. I've just been letting everything happen without me recently. I can't be bothered with anything recently, but such is life. My life's been generally bland today. Not much on my mind these days, but eh.

Posted by: card con consolidate credit debt | August 27, 2007 1:09 PM | Report abuse

There are too many, not enough handicapped parking spaces in our city

Posted by: 2005 89 europe italy | August 28, 2007 2:40 PM | Report abuse

My life's been pretty dull these days. Such is life. I've basically been doing nothing.

Posted by: anaheim discount hotel reservation | August 28, 2007 3:15 PM | Report abuse

Cousin dating is, is not okay

Posted by: aarp hotel discount scottsdale | August 30, 2007 9:19 AM | Report abuse

I haven't gotten much done. Basically nothing noteworthy going on right now, but shrug. I can't be bothered with anything recently. I guess it doesn't bother me. Maybe tomorrow. I feel like a bunch of nothing.

Posted by: 2006 album music new | August 30, 2007 9:41 AM | Report abuse

The government should be persuaded to pay for all healthcare

Posted by: africa discount airfare | August 30, 2007 9:45 AM | Report abuse

I can't be bothered with anything these days. I guess it doesn't bother me. What can I say?

Posted by: activation | August 31, 2007 8:44 AM | Report abuse

Parents have no right in spanking you - Or do they? That could be another persuasive speech topic

Posted by: interest | August 31, 2007 9:16 AM | Report abuse

I just don't have anything to say these days. I've just been sitting around doing nothing. More or less nothing seems worth bothering with.

Posted by: activation | August 31, 2007 9:20 AM | Report abuse

giornata mondiale dei diritti umani (il 10 dicembre): sarebbe stato giusto processarlo?

Posted by: medal | September 6, 2007 11:46 PM | Report abuse

Sportspeople are, are not our Rolemodels

Posted by: my-tool | September 7, 2007 12:41 AM | Report abuse

I've just been staying at home waiting for something to happen. I've just been letting everything wash over me. I can't be bothered with anything recently.

Posted by: our-communication | September 7, 2007 12:48 AM | Report abuse

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