Subscribe to this Blog
Today's Blogs
    The Checkup:

Milestones Gone By the Wayside

For several months now, we've been a diaper-free house. In January, we gave the changing table to a new teen mom in need. In April, our three-year-old started wearing "special nighttime underwear" that he has successfully kept dry during all but a handful of nights. No swim diapers at the pool. No pull-ups at night. My babies are growing up.

This week, we said farewell to the much-loved double stroller. It's been sitting in a corner since the fall, so it was time to hand it over to a family with smaller children who could get some use out of it. A part of me is sad to see it go, not because the stroller itself was all that great -- though it was a well-researched, lightweight, foldable, swivel-wheeled type -- rather, it's simply a symbol of those baby and toddler years, when Mom and Dad know everything, when a kiss on a boo-boo makes it all better, when the smallest ant is a marvel. They had some great moments in that stroller, such as when they'd lean their heads on each other to nap. They also had plenty of fights about whose side was whose and who could climb in and out faster. But let's forget those today. This is all about nostalgia.

For some, this moment comes when the crib leaves the house. For me, it's the gear, the clothes and the toys. We have no plans for a new baby, so, as three-year-old moves on to new clothes and new toys, the old ones go to friends or strangers. Three-year-old's even gotten into the act. He's been making a pile of toys to give to various babies he knows. The baby years (and baby-proofed house) are officially gone.

Do you get nostalgic for the "old" times with your kids? Or do you just look forward to making new memories?

By Stacey Garfinkle |  July 11, 2007; 7:20 AM ET  | Category:  Babies , Preschoolers
Previous: Food Fear | Next: 'Bye, Bye, Plane'

Comments


I do get nostalgic but then I look at my husbands 2 younger siblings that are expecting new ones a month apart this fall (one already has a 2 yo) and realize that I am very happy to be where I am now. As my niece is dealing with yet another ear infection, or sinus infection, or any other illness du jour where her mom and dad have to juggle schedules to figure who is staying home that day or is Grandma free to watch her. I don't miss that!

My kids are preteens/teenagers now and as many headaches as they give me sometimes, I wouldn't trade places with a new mom for anything in the world!

Posted by: MDMom | July 11, 2007 7:55 AM | Report abuse

I'm looking forward to those milestones. I have a 2-year-old and an almost 1 year-old, I'm still dealing with the diapers and pull-ups. I'm already planning what to do with their old clothes they've already out grown.

Posted by: Momof2MD | July 11, 2007 8:06 AM | Report abuse

Sometimes I miss the crib. I miss when our daughters would wake up in their crib very early in the morning and call out, and I would go in their room, locate the dolly that disappeared during the night, and pick them up.

I actually videotaped this once, and I'm grateful that I did. Our oldest daughter (now 6) thinks it's hilarious to watch.

Posted by: ViennaDad | July 11, 2007 8:07 AM | Report abuse

I absolutely get nostalgic. Last summer I decided it was time to get rid of the baby things since we had officially decided two was our magic number. My mother called as I was sorting clothes; my daughter answered the phone and told my mom I was looking through her old baby clothes and crying!!! I love not having to deal with diapers or nighttime feedings but I do miss those little angels. They are very fun now and the conversations we have are priceless (mine are 4 and 7 now). But, I do wish sometimes I could go back for one day and relive those baby/toddler moments.

Posted by: PT Fed Mof2 | July 11, 2007 8:13 AM | Report abuse

We are in the final stages of potty training - can't wait until the little potty and the changing table disappear. But I think the happiest milestone is going out without a diaper bag. To be able to leave the house with out packing up stuff is very liberating.

I do miss the cuddling in a rocking chair with a bottle and a book in the evening. That can never be replaced. But new memories are on the way!

Posted by: Burke Mom | July 11, 2007 8:14 AM | Report abuse

Strange story... I held on to my sons baby outfit they wore home from hospital - maybe their kids would want to wear one day. Nostalgic. As part of a peace offering with my MIL at the time (weird story why she was mad at me); I let her pick out the outfit my eldest came home in. It turned out she provided the outfit my husband came home in as an infant. I also used it for our second son. Fast forward to divorce; husband remarried and new wife expecting baby. And she (now ex-MIL)reminded him of this baby outfit and he wanted it back. I begged him to please respect the outfit was sentimental to me, but that was totally disrespected and he demanded it back. I opted to return the outfit since they were so low-ball about it; I wasn't stooping to that level. lesson learned - don't let other family pick out the outfit your kid comes home in - they could turn out to be Indian givers and want it back.

My kids are teenagers now and trust me - that so far has been the TOUGHEST part of parenting. Enjoy your kids now!! And stay together as a family. It is worth it!

Posted by: MS | July 11, 2007 8:37 AM | Report abuse

MS

"they could turn out to be Indian givers and want it back. "

"Indian givers"!!!!

Posted by: Jake | July 11, 2007 8:43 AM | Report abuse

Whenever I see someone holding a sleeping toddler, with that pink face and usually some kind of curls - limp and trusting on a parent's shoulder. I miss that. I miss that feeling of complete love that filled me when I held my sleeping toddler.

My daughter just turned 16. She's a joy.

Posted by: Teenagers Mom | July 11, 2007 8:50 AM | Report abuse

Are you going to keep their first condom and have their jock straps bronzed?

Posted by: Anonymous | July 11, 2007 8:58 AM | Report abuse

"Are you going to keep their first condom and have their jock straps bronzed?"

My mom did...she loves me

Posted by: WHA | July 11, 2007 9:14 AM | Report abuse

"Are you going to keep their first condom and have their jock straps bronzed?"

It will all end up in the trash heap when your kids pack you off to the old folks' home. Byeee!

Posted by: Anonymous | July 11, 2007 9:15 AM | Report abuse

"I miss that feeling of complete love that filled me when I held my sleeping toddler."

I get the same feeling holding my sleeping cats. When they get pregnant, I can sell their children. Good luck with the toddler.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 11, 2007 9:25 AM | Report abuse

MS,

So your husband isn't part of your children's family? The clothes doesn't have any value to him? The gift wasn't to you, it was to the family that he was a part of, in no way is it being an Indian Giver.

Posted by: Chris | July 11, 2007 10:15 AM | Report abuse

"they could turn out to be Indian givers and want it back."

Wow, I thought this phrase was long gone from use.

The outfit was obviously sentimental to her, too. Her son came home in it first. And, if its to be tradition, I'm sure it will also be loaned to your sons for the children.

Posted by: RT | July 11, 2007 10:18 AM | Report abuse

When my oldest daughter was still an infant, I used to tuck her into a sling, and walk around our neighborhood at night, singing her to sleep.

She's a wonderful six year old now, and I love watching her grow, and re-discovering how wonderful she is at each new age.

But there are times when I do get nostalgic for the little baby she used to be, and the long walks we would take together at night.

Posted by: Robert in Austin | July 11, 2007 10:46 AM | Report abuse

I do plead my ignorance on the issue of my kids baby clothes. Maybe as a mother I felt "rights" to hold on to such important items from my children's child. That's why I gently packed up the outfit and kept track of it all these years. Generally dad's aren't sentimental about such things. If I'd known he wasn't going to stay committed to the family; then I would have picked out an outfit for the kids to wear. It was an extreme measure on my part to ask her to pick out the outfit; trying to bring peace to the family and make us all one happy clan. My bad; you're right. The kids have two parents -not just me. That's why I relinquished the outfit - I'm sure the newest baby wore it home to keep tradition. Who needs nostalgia anyway?

Posted by: MS | July 11, 2007 10:57 AM | Report abuse

MS

This happened how many years ago? Your kids are now teens? Give it a rest!

The "Indian Giver" expression is really, really bad. Is that a regional expression?

Posted by: Anonymous | July 11, 2007 11:05 AM | Report abuse

I agree,Indian givers are the worst. The fun is now when you can do something with them. The baby years are work, now is the fun part

Posted by: Anonymous | July 11, 2007 11:06 AM | Report abuse

"The fun is now when you can do something with them. The baby years are work, now is the fun part"

The grandparent years are even more fun!

Posted by: Anonymous | July 11, 2007 11:11 AM | Report abuse

My little one is only 9 months old and I'm going through serious nostalgia because he decided to wean this week, and for the first time since he was born we haven't nursed for three days. He's crawling and beginning to toddle, and while I am enchanted with the amazing little person he is now, I do miss the sweet little snuggler he was.

Posted by: Mommabean | July 11, 2007 11:15 AM | Report abuse

I'm already nostalgic and my daughter is only 16 months. I'm so excited by her new skills, but every day I see her chubby thighs getting leaner (less places to squeeze) and her vocabulary increasing (This morning it was "No. Mama.") I'm excited to see her grow up, but I could spend hours on end just kissing her baby head. I get tears as I write this. I guess that happens to some of us when we become Mamas.

Posted by: Mama | July 11, 2007 11:18 AM | Report abuse

I also agree the expression "IG" was a poor choice. I do apologize for any offense. It is basically a very old terminology from my upbringing and was not meant to be offensive.

This incident happened recently actually.

Posted by: MS | July 11, 2007 11:20 AM | Report abuse

Isn't Indian Givers actually offensive, if to anyone, to white people, and not Indians? Historically it wasn't Indians that gave things and took them back, it was white people. In any case, continued usage of the phrase is probably beneficial in reminding us of our past.

Anyways, it's really the dutch that are the most harshly treated in the english language: Dutch uncle, Dutch treat, Dutch courage. Those phrases go by unnoticed, but indian giver raises ire.

Posted by: Cliff | July 11, 2007 11:49 AM | Report abuse

Cliff,

That is because outside of Dutch treat, those terms haven't been used by anyone under 50 in the last 20 years, and Dutch treat has been shortened to "Dutch" and is not used as an insult.

Posted by: Chris | July 11, 2007 11:57 AM | Report abuse

Chris

"Cliff,

That is because outside of Dutch treat, those terms haven't been used by anyone under 50 in the last 20 years, and Dutch treat has been shortened to "Dutch" and is not used as an insult."

And Dutch courage has morphed into "Irish courage"!

Posted by: Spike | July 11, 2007 12:00 PM | Report abuse

Kids are 2 and 5 and we're just about certain not to have more. Been giving away and selling stuff for a while. I do miss them as little babies.
I watch them grow and think: I'm going to miss them when they grow up. Not just cause they may not be with me, but their 2 YO self, or their 5 YO self or any stage in between. I cry now to think they won't be this age forever.

Posted by: atlmom | July 11, 2007 12:34 PM | Report abuse

Loved this post.

Mine is only 18 months, and -- like someone said earlier -- I am already nostalgic. She was a nightmare when she was teeny, so I don't really miss those times. But as she gets more and more independent, as exciting as it is, it's hard to watch her need me a little less. For the most part, though, I try to enjoy watching her discover new skills.

Here's a question: We're now thinking about trying for a second child. While I am mostly excited about this -- I really want a sibling for my daughter -- I am feeling a little sad about it. It feels like giving up on her babyhood becasue there will be a new baby in the family. I also worry about how she'll feel about that . . . though I am sure in the long run, she'll get used to sharing our attention (and I think that's actually good for her). Anyone else have these mixed feelings about having a second child? I am wondering if it's a bad sign . . .

Posted by: DC Mom | July 11, 2007 1:02 PM | Report abuse

Anyways, it's really the dutch that are the most harshly treated in the english language: Dutch uncle, Dutch treat, Dutch courage. Those phrases go by unnoticed, but indian giver raises ire.

That's because the Dutch are white and PC people never feel uncomfortable insulting white people only minorities

Posted by: Anonymous | July 11, 2007 1:03 PM | Report abuse

"That's because the Dutch are white and PC people never feel uncomfortable insulting white people only minorities"

Cuz' white people don't make a DRAMA about everything!

Posted by: Anonymous | July 11, 2007 1:08 PM | Report abuse

I also worry about how she'll feel about that . . . though I am sure in the long run, she'll get used to sharing our attention (and I think that's actually good for her). Anyone else have these mixed feelings about having a second child? I am wondering if it's a bad sign . . .


Posted by: DC Mom | July 11, 2007 01:02 PM

The only thing that would be worrisome is to not fall into the situation where the child rules the household and decisions to be made. If you and your husband have a strong marriage and handle parenting well; and you want another child - go for it. There is no crystal ball to say what that new childs personality will be; how the siblings will get along; etc. You just work with the gift of child presented to you with unconditional love and go from there. Do not overthink it. Parenting with strong willed children is tough; make sure your marriage can withstand it. Marriage first - kids second. Kids deserve a loving and whole household - make that decision to provide that BEFORE they are born and life will be good.

Posted by: C.W. | July 11, 2007 1:26 PM | Report abuse

All of you seem so hung up on the "firsts" that happen in infancy and toddlerhood, it is a bit sad that you don't seem to appreciate all the firsts to come. There will be first friends, days of school,lost teeth, sports teams, sleepovers, crushes, dances, drivers licenses, dates and many more. As a Mom who has been there I can assure you there are many wonderful parenting milestnes to come, you just have to be open to seeing them.

Posted by: California Mom | July 11, 2007 1:30 PM | Report abuse

I remember when my son kicked his first goal winning shot in soccer. The look on his face was priceless.

Posted by: pATRICK | July 11, 2007 1:39 PM | Report abuse

"I also worry about how she'll feel about that . . . though I am sure in the long run, she'll get used to sharing our attention (and I think that's actually good for her)."

How can you be so sure? A lot of kids resent their younger siblings forever.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 11, 2007 1:42 PM | Report abuse

I have a 15-month-old daughter and I get rid of unneeded stuff ASAP for several reasons. We have decided not to have any more children; we live in a teeny house with little closet space, no attic, no basement, no garage; I'm not the nostalgic type. I have kept a very small number of items of clothing that my husband loved to see her in. Most of the gear was hand-me-down and I'm happy to pass it to my brother whose baby is due in November!

Posted by: MaryB | July 11, 2007 1:43 PM | Report abuse

California Mom

It's perfectly reasonable for people to have mixed emotions on these things. I can be sad about my daughter's babyhood leaving while still be excited for what's to come. I don't think anyone is saying they're not open to seeing all the new firsts, just that they're a little nostalgic for the younger years.

Just like my question about having a 2nd child. I can't imagine I am the first person experiencing mixed emotions about it, but that doesn't suggest I am not excited about #2 or that I will let #1 make the decision for me.

Posted by: DC Mom | July 11, 2007 1:45 PM | Report abuse

MaryB -- I'm with you. I've even been passing things on, knowing we'll probably have another child. I can't WAIT to get this baby stuff out of my house once we're done having kids. I miss the little hands, the cuddling, the gummy mouths. I will NOT miss the stuff! And we even have an attic to store it in!

Posted by: DC Mom | July 11, 2007 1:51 PM | Report abuse

MaryB

"Most of the gear was hand-me-down and I'm happy to pass it to my brother whose baby is due in November!"

Wow! My kids pooped all over their stuff. No one wants the hand-me-downs that come out of my house!

Posted by: Anonymous | July 11, 2007 1:56 PM | Report abuse

DC Mom -- I don't think it's a bad sign at all. I had very similar feelings before having my 2nd. I think it's perfectly normal!

As for nostalgia, I never thought I was a "baby" person -- always have enjoyed the toddler/preschool set far more than babies (including when I worked in a daycare back as a college student). So imagine my surprise when I was feeling nostalgic one evening a few weeks ago, missing having a baby asleep on my shoulder. My 11-month old won't stay still for even a minute, so gone are the days where he'll put his head down on my shoulder and doze off.

But, like others have said, I won't miss the stuff that comes with babies. I am counting the days until my 2-year old is potty trained, when she outgrows her crib, and when we will no longer need strollers and pack-and-plays during travel. It was a happy day in my household 3 months ago when DS outgrew (a.k.a. climbed out of) the bouncy seat and we gave it away.

While I'm definitely looking forward to making new memories, I occasionally do have fleeting glimpses of true nostalgia to baby days (or is it daze?).

Posted by: Jen | July 11, 2007 2:26 PM | Report abuse

DC Mom -
I'm in the same place as you. I know we want to have more kids, and sooner rather than later, but it does feel quite nostalgic knowing our baby will be the Big Sister one day. It's so hard to imaginer her not being the center of our world, but then again, it was hard to imagine her even existing in the first place.
Like someone else send, I was never a baby person, either, but I have become one and gravitate towards the newborns I see. If I had a nickel for everytime someone told how quickly it goes by (and everytime I nodded and ignored them), I'd be doing really well!

Posted by: Mama | July 11, 2007 2:49 PM | Report abuse

But, like others have said, I won't miss the stuff that comes with babies. I am counting the days until my 2-year old is potty trained, when she outgrows her crib, and when we will no longer need strollers and pack-and-plays during travel.

You have no idea Jen. It is a great time enjoy!

Posted by: pATRICK | July 11, 2007 3:15 PM | Report abuse

To those feeling sad about their "babies" becoming a big sib, I completely remember that feeling. But, I found it even more amazing to watch my first child develop a relationship with his baby brother. To see him gently pat his brother's back while I was trying to get a burp out, to hear him declare to other preschoolers "that's MY baby," and to see him help the little guy put on shoes, get into his carseat, do a puzzle, play trains, etc. It's so amazing when the child you cuddled, nurtured & taught wants to cuddle, nurture, and teach his (or her) sibling....just the way you did for him! Watching them together makes me think DH and I are getting this whole parenting thing right.

My boys are almost 5 and almost 3 now, and their relationship is beautiful. (Yes, they fight, but they are also best friends.)

Posted by: JB's mom | July 11, 2007 3:26 PM | Report abuse

PS -- I loved the baby years and also miss the snuggles.

But now I love that they are becoming more and more independent. It is so fun to hear them having conversations with their friends and each other, and to see their developing personalities.

Although...I haven't given away anything! I always say it is b/c friends have younger children and it's nice that we have a pack-n-play, bouncy seat, swing, etc. here for when they visit. But maybe I am more nostalgic than I think!

Posted by: JB's mom | July 11, 2007 3:33 PM | Report abuse

JB's Mom:

Thanks! I hadn't thought about the joys that will come from watching my little one become an older sibling! But I already see how excited she is about babies, and how she already wants to hold them . . . Maybe it will be both happy and sad for her, as well as for us. Happy because she gets a little sibling to teach and play with, and sad because someone else will become "the baby" of the house.

Posted by: DC Mom | July 11, 2007 3:48 PM | Report abuse

JB's Mom: Your boys sound a lot like mine. Very much in love with each other. It is amazing to watch the older one teach the younger one. I often think, "wow, he remembered!" when 5-year-old tells 3-year-old something I said but didn't know at the time if he really got it. His mind absorbs and passes on.

Posted by: Stacey Garfinkle | July 11, 2007 3:48 PM | Report abuse

pATRICK -- I meant to say that I just won't be nostalgic when the large baby items that eventually leave the house (not that I'm not enjoying my little ones and their current stages). I'm definitely enjoying every minute now with both, because baby/toddlerhood will be gone faster than I know it. But I am most certainly looking forward to one day not having all the large baby items all over the house, including things like the pack-and-play, changing stand, stroller, high chair, etc. So, for me, nostalgia isn't brought on by getting rid of baby items (as perhaps it is for Stacey and others), but more just realizing every now and again that the baby days are coming to an end.

Posted by: Jen | July 11, 2007 3:54 PM | Report abuse

Jen our big day was when the bumpers came off the tables and the gates came off the stairs. Our house FINALLY looked like a real house again.

Posted by: pATRICK | July 11, 2007 4:01 PM | Report abuse

pATRICK -- thanks for giving me hope that my house will look like a real house again one day!

Posted by: Jen | July 11, 2007 4:05 PM | Report abuse

JEN, now if we can just do something about bouncing the basketball incessantly, we will be ok!;)

Posted by: pATRICK | July 11, 2007 4:09 PM | Report abuse

I wish I could have just one more. I struggled with infertility - took me ten years to have the first one, and *only* five years for the second. I've enjoyed every minute and every milestone.

The boys are 15 and 10 now. Had a miscarriage just a few days before the younger one's 4th birthday, and I think he was even more disappointed than I was. Both guys would love to have another baby, although I think they're "getting" it that I'm physically not able to have one now.

Yes, the first/older child becoming a big brother (or big sister) is a really wonderful process to watch. Number-one son was totally into the big-brother-big-sister class that my HMO offered. And he was even more into his baby brother than the doll/baby he used in the class.

Those are the moments that I treasure, and the experiences I'd love to give my younger son.

Posted by: Sue | July 11, 2007 6:00 PM | Report abuse

One post mentioned it in passing, but I'd like to repeat the great news for most of you young mothers.
I am a Nostalgia Nut and kept a LOT of stuff, finally got rid of cribs, strollers, bikes, etc., but kept clothes, mementos, etc.
Here's the great news - I'm a Grandma ("Nana" to be exact) and I'm reliving all those wonderful 'firsts'!
It's like motherhood with all the plusses (and nostalgia) and few of the minuses (ear infections, dirty diapers, tantrums, etc.) - if I face something I don't feel like handling (see above), then Mom & Dad step in.
When I visit, I read the exact same books I read years ago, and cuddle my little grandson & daughter on my lap Just Like I Used To!! I have a photo of my 3 yr. old son 22 yrs. ago, in Santa's lap, wearing the same winter coat grandson did this last winter!
And I tear up with emotion just like I did 'way back then. It's The Best.

One tip when you're grandparents - pitch in around the house & yard as much as you can when you visit and you'll always be welcome! Also, you don't need to bring a present every time you come, or OVERindulge the little ones in other ways - both may make you unpopular with the parents.....just love 'em and enjoy 'em!

From a happy Nana who raised 1 girl & 3 boys and is always welcome at their houses now....

Posted by: lady laughs | July 11, 2007 6:35 PM | Report abuse

My DD is 19 months old now, and I'm treasuring all of her firsts. I love this toddler stage so much, but it seems to me that just when I think DD's at her most fun age ever, things change and somehow get even better.

One thing that I don't get is parents who seem to want to rush their kids along from milestone to milestone. In my cohort, there are several moms that always seem to be pushing for the next step -- early weaning, sleep training, etc. And now these parents are hell-bent on getting their kids toilet trained by the time they turn 2. I half expect to hear they'll be enrolling the kids in Kindergarten next month.

Not that I love diapers or anything, but I don't see the rush to push on to the next phase.

Posted by: NewSAHM | July 12, 2007 8:58 AM | Report abuse

I think I'm going to frow up.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 12, 2007 10:08 AM | Report abuse

To all of you who are selling or giving away your baby furniture because you don't plan to have anymore kids -- never say never unless you are willing to take permanent precautions to avoid pregnancy.

My husband and I did the same thing, absolutely confident that our family was complete. My husband agreed in theory to get a vasectomy, but he was too squeamish to actually undergo the procedure, so kept putting it off. Surprise, surprise! Eight years later we unexpectedly needed all of those baby items again. Thankfully many of our friends still had cribs and changing tables laying around in the attic because they felt too nostalgic to get rid of them.

While the furniture went by the wayside, I do have what I call my "grandmother box" full of my very favorite baby outfits and the beautiful handmade baby clothing and other items (e.g. cross-stitched bibs) we received as gifts. I also saved every handmade baby blanket and quilt. Hopefully when the time comes my children and their spouses will appreciate the nostalgia and tradition associated with these items.

Posted by: MP | July 12, 2007 4:44 PM | Report abuse

I do get nostalgic - I've recently met a lot of babies around one year old, the age that my daughter was when we moved here. I am thrilled to see my daughter (almost 3) growing up and get rid of the diapers etc. but I do miss that new toddler period and have special memories associated with it because it was when my daughter turned one year old that I became a SAHM.

I guess we can relive it all if/when we have another child....

Posted by: Vienna Mom | July 13, 2007 8:39 AM | Report abuse

Regarding the post from the mother considering having a 2nd baby and wondering about her son's reaction to this--- our son is 16 mos old, and we just brought his baby brother home from the hospital 2 weeks ago. I wondered about his reaction to the baby, and am happy to report that he seems to very much enjoy having the baby around. He kisses the baby's head, looks in on him, and seems concerned when he hears the baby cry. It is hard to inagine what he thinks about the baby--maybe he thinks the baby is just an entertaining visitor, or maybe he understands on some level that this is his brother. In any case, it is amazing how well he has adjusted to this. We're happy to know that each of our children now has a companion and lifelong friend.

Posted by: ars | July 13, 2007 11:39 PM | Report abuse

Regarding the post from the mother considering having a 2nd baby and wondering about her son's reaction to this--- our son is 16 mos old, and we just brought his baby brother home from the hospital 2 weeks ago. I wondered about his reaction to the baby, and am happy to report that he seems to very much enjoy having the baby around. He kisses the baby's head, looks in on him, and seems concerned when he hears the baby cry. It is hard to inagine what he thinks about the baby--maybe he thinks the baby is just an entertaining visitor, or maybe he understands on some level that this is his brother. In any case, it is amazing how well he has adjusted to this. We're happy to know that each of our children now has a companion and lifelong friend.

Posted by: ars | July 13, 2007 11:39 PM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 

© 2010 The Washington Post Company