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Are Food Dyes a Problem?

Jacob Kushner was 6 years old when he started having explosive meltdowns. They could last 45 minutes and he'd sometimes break his favorite toys in his tantrums. Three to four times a week, he could become wild and violent, says his mother, Judy Mann. His parents sought help anywhere they could try: Mainstream medicine, energy healing, therapy, a holistic doctor. They cut sugar out of his diet, thinking that was the cause.

Finally, when Jacob was 11, Mann read "The Explosive Child" by Ross W. Green, a book she credits with nearly stopping Jacob's fits. After reading the book, she joined the Feingold Association, which advocates the elimination of artificial colorings, flavorings, sweeteners and preservatives from the diets of people with ADHD and other health issues.

Mann began keeping track of the times Jacob ate artificial dyes and found a link. There was that time at the movies after he ate buttered popcorn that turned out to have an added coloring and another after eating five Skittles at a friends' house. Since cutting the artificial colorings out of Jacob's diet, his meltdowns are far fewer, Mann says, adding that he's had only 3 or 4 tantrums in the past six months.

According to the watchdog group Center for Science in the Public Interest, food dyes are a problem the FDA should address. Earlier this week, CSPI petitioned the FDA to remove eight synthetic food dyes from use. The dyes are listed on labels under such names as "Yellow No. 5," "Red 40" and "Blue 1." Because removal of food dyes will take so long, Jacobson says, CSPI is asking the FDA for mandated warning labels on foods made with the artificial colorings.

The potential negative effects with artificial food dyes have long been an issue for CSPI co-founder Michael F. Jacobson, who wrote a book on food additives. It's back in the forefront, however, because CSPI has seen progress in Britain with some large food manufacturers replacing food colorings from products with natural alternatives. The change there is because of "increasing consumer worries over artificial colors, particularly after a British study bolstered the hyperactivity theory," writes the Chicago Tribune. Last September, the United Kingdom's Food Standards Agency alerted parents of hyperactive children that eliminating artificial colors may help the children's behavior.

In its last update on the safety of artifical colors in food in 2004, the FDA says there is no scientific evidence that shows a link between artificial food colors and child hyperactivity. "We are not aware of any information at this time that would change the position stated in this FDA brochure regarding whether additives in food cause hyperactivity," says FDA press officer Michael Herndon.

For Judy Mann, and her son, though, the link is clear in their minds. And so, Mann says, her family looks at food labels closely before buying foods. Some of the same brands of food have products with colorings and similar products without, she said, such as Kraft Macaroni & Cheese, Tostito chips, Cheetos and Jelly Bellies.

Have you noticed any change in your child's behavior based on the types of foods he eats?

By Stacey Garfinkle |  June 6, 2008; 7:00 AM ET  | Category:  Child Development
Previous: Four Years AND Forty Pounds | Next: A 'Remarkable' World

Comments


I really hae never noticed a corellation between my girls behavior and the food they eat, but they can become explosive if they don't eat. I definitely keep meal times regular and push healthy snacks every few hours to keep them from hitting melt-down mode while I am preparing dinner. I don't go out of my way to avoid anything except artificial sweetners and high fructose corn syrup (which is hard since it is in everything).

Posted by: Momof5 | June 6, 2008 8:13 AM | Report abuse

The Feingold diet is somewhat controversial because it only helps 70% of people who try to it out and of those 70%, it only significantly aides 40%; "curing" only about 20%. ( I found these statistic somewhere online- no clue where.) So the Feingold diet just does not work for everyone. For the people it does help, like my son, it is a miracle and the cure we needed to help our child be the person we knew he was all along. My son is extremely bright, but his "terrible" twos were unlike anything I had ever read or experienced with other children. I consider us lucky to have figured out his principle problem at age 3, after his Spiderman birthday party when he became unhinged. I say it's worth a try! Even if if it doesn't end up helping your child, it doesn't cost anything to not give your child red 40 and to cut out artificial flavorings, like vanillian, and nitrates. (Yup, no hot dogs for summer and look out for lunch meats) Give it two weeks, if it helps, you have gained your child's happiness and self esteem; if it doesn't, you ate well for two weeks.

Posted by: Anonymous | June 6, 2008 8:50 AM | Report abuse

People with explosive children should apply some percussive management to the kid's rear end. Why don't you just say 'tantrum' instead of 'meltdown' -- the new yuppie term for an uncontrollable kid. If you can't control them don't have them and inflict them on innocent bystanders.

Another study has shown that people who read the Washington Compost have intolerable, obnoxious children.

Posted by: Anonymous | June 6, 2008 8:50 AM | Report abuse

People with explosive children should apply some percussive management to the kid's rear end. Why don't you just say 'tantrum' instead of 'meltdown' -- the new yuppie term for an uncontrollable kid. If you can't control them don't have them and inflict them on innocent bystanders.

Another study has shown that people who read the Washington Compost have intolerable, obnoxious children.

Posted by: | June 6, 2008 8:50 AM

why do you bother posting? does it make you feel smug & superior? i have a friend who has celiacs, a problem that until recently was not recognized as an issue. when she changed her diet her health improved. quite a few of her family members have celiac; some have changed their diet & others are like you who don't believe that there is any connect to the way they feel & what they eat. they continue to eat gluten & are gassy & bloated - just like you.

Posted by: quark | June 6, 2008 9:19 AM | Report abuse

I also truly believe that most children who have meltdowns are actually having tantrums. Yes, there are many children who are affected by medical issues. But, there are many many parents who simply are not parenting because they are too tired or simply want to be their child's friend, not their responsible parent.

Posted by: another mom | June 6, 2008 9:24 AM | Report abuse

Not only I noticed the difference, so did my son. Even if likes the school lunches, he has to avoid it because, as he puts it, of "fat, grease, and dyes". May not work the same way for other children, but worth trying.

Posted by: Anonymous | June 6, 2008 9:31 AM | Report abuse

Fr June 6:

>People with explosive children should apply some percussive management to the kid's rear end....

Ever hear of allergies, brainiac?????

Posted by: alex | June 6, 2008 9:44 AM | Report abuse

I'm not the parent of a child with ADHD. In fact, I'm 65 years old and a grandfather! But I certainly attest to the negative effects of food dyes. I have a mild case of tinnitus, a continual ringing in my left ear. Most of the time, the volume is low enough that I can ignore it - except after I eat a food containing Yellow #5 or #6. Within less than a minute, the volume will increase to the level that it's distracting. There are other chemicals that produce the same reaction - MSG and aspirin, most notably. But all this is well known - I learned that the yellow dyes were culpable probably 15 years ago from a tinnitus society. Perhaps the FDA can plausibly claim that at this time there is insufficient scientific evidence to link AHDH and food dyes. But they cannot deny that these additives have negative effects. Fortunately, over the last decade or so, I'm seen a significant shift toward beta carotene as a yellow additive rather than yellow #5 and #6. I hope that food vendors will increasingly make comparable shifts for the other dyes.

Posted by: Jim B | June 6, 2008 9:46 AM | Report abuse

I actually notice the difference in myself. We're not hard core about eliminating any last vestige of dyes or flavours in our food, but we generally serve and eat fresh wholesome food. When we do get the odd junk food treat I find it does impact on my own mood.

So, I believe some people are sensitive.

Posted by: Shandra | June 6, 2008 9:47 AM | Report abuse

There have been artifical dyes, flavoring and sweetners in kids' snacks for decades. The only difference is the child rearing methods being used now versus those used in the 1960's. Mom's chose their children over having a career and TWO Lexuses in the garage and both parents imposed a little dicipline on their children rather than a "time out" in an activity filled room. They also didn't get a new toy every week as a "reward" for not being obnoxious or because the parents' felt guilty for dumping their kids in daycare so that the parents could have a more exciting life with their careers.

Posted by: SpareTheRod | June 6, 2008 9:49 AM | Report abuse

There is no correlation between food dyes and behavior. There isn't one shred of evidence of this that wasn't disproven 20-30 years ago. That is proven in scientific experiments and unlike some of you, I have no problem putting my moniker to this comment.

People used to call these tantrums sugar-related, chocolate-related, or whatever. Then last year it was HFCS until that was proven bogus. Now they want to say it's food dyes?

People, if your child calms down when you make a special dinner for them that they love and it makes them feel special and the whole family eats together because you made healthy-tasting food that wasn't fried, made out of semi-food ingredients, or thrown back to them while you're driving then... it must be the dyes!

How about your child needs more down-time?
I'm mostly a vegetarian and my kids are too, but my son's "sugar rush" tantrums lasted from about age 20-27 months and they were gone after that.

I am a big proponent of eating real food vs heavily-processed food like bread and pasta, and the kids have been getting corn on the cob all week w/ cucumbers and green beans and potatoes and rice. All stuff that's easy to make (you can't bake a dozen potatoes to last the whole week?) and is actually real food.

But blaming food dyes? You people sound like medieval mobs trying to burn witches.

Get Real. Get Educated by a university. If you believe this food dye nonsense then you must have failed chemistry, don't make that my problem.

Posted by: DCer | June 6, 2008 9:51 AM | Report abuse

the reason I said the sugar rush tantrums were limited is because they were just a manifestation of terrible twos that were gone as soon as he was able to control his temper.

Posted by: Anonymous | June 6, 2008 9:52 AM | Report abuse

Mom's chose their children over having a career and TWO Lexuses in the garage
-----

You mean "Dad didn't abandon the family and leave mom to pay for everything."

Posted by: Anonymous | June 6, 2008 9:53 AM | Report abuse

Wow. My daughter is a grumpy hungry person and is very bouncy with too much refined sugar but that is nothing compared to the kids in this article. We try to minimize junk food but it's out there and cannot easily be completely elimated (especially at parties, other social events).

Posted by: 21117 | June 6, 2008 9:59 AM | Report abuse

If the kid's diet consists of Kraft Mac & Cheese, Tostitos, Cheetos, and Jelly Bellies, the problem is the mother that lets him eat that stuff, not the dye.

Posted by: Anonymous | June 6, 2008 10:07 AM | Report abuse

I have a girl with ADD and experimented with eliminating dyes and other additives from her diet and saw no measurable difference. She doesn't have the hyperactivity component though.

Posted by: anne | June 6, 2008 10:23 AM | Report abuse

Ask any preschool teacher. SHe'll tell you that the food additive reactions are real. Kids who are wired on artificial flavors, dyes and colors behave differently.

I think they're all related -- what you feed your kids, how you parent and how you schedule your kids. Kids who eat most of their food out of a box while riding in the car on the way to another activity are clearly also overscheduled, overstimulated and probably in need of downtime, real food and attention.

Posted by: Anonymous | June 6, 2008 10:24 AM | Report abuse

More warnings on food. I'm waiting for the day when individual green beans are covered with a huge sticker warning the potential consumer that the bean may be infected with pesticides, have trace peanut oils, and that, if planted, it may grow a giant stalk that leads to the home of a giant.

Posted by: Franconia | June 6, 2008 10:25 AM | Report abuse

I have a question for those of you out there -- my son eats black beans, garbanzo beans and kidney beans regularly, but we just open a can, rinse the beans and store them in the fridge for him.

Are there any potential downsides to using canned beans? I try to buy organic when it's available.

Posted by: SJR | June 6, 2008 10:26 AM | Report abuse

as a kid, i wasn't allowed to eat orange foods

parents said they made me hyper. this was in the early 80s

how i waited till lunch at school to trade food for cheetos

Posted by: me | June 6, 2008 10:37 AM | Report abuse

SJR -
Canned beans tend to have a lot of sodium in them. Rinsing definiately helps, but doesn't get all of it off. The only other big concerns is botulism, but as long as you aren't using dented/bulging cans, I'd say you're pretty safe.

Posted by: Nut | June 6, 2008 10:52 AM | Report abuse

My son cannot have anything with food coloring, including medications that are coated with food coloring. When he inadvertendly has consumed something with food coloring, the results are devastating because his body totally swells up. He recently was diagnosed with angio adema--a life threatening reaction to food coloring.

Posted by: Frida | June 6, 2008 11:08 AM | Report abuse

...Mom's chose their children over having a career and TWO Lexuses in the garage
-----

You mean "Dad didn't abandon the family and leave mom to pay for everything."

I don't fully understand your comment but are you suggesting that every child in daycare is there because the father abandoned the family and mom has to work?

My point is that if you are going to bring a child into the world, you should be willing make the full commitment. You can't take a child to the animal shelter when it stops being cute or becomes an inconvenience or impediment to advancement in a career. So stop trying to blame yellow dye (or whatever) for a child's reaction to neglect.

Posted by: SpareTheRod | June 6, 2008 11:15 AM | Report abuse

But blaming food dyes? You people sound like medieval mobs trying to burn witches.

Get Real. Get Educated by a university. If you believe this food dye nonsense then you must have failed chemistry, don't make that my problem.

Posted by: DCer | June 6, 2008 9:51 AM

then how do you explain the anecdotal evidence that says for otherwise for some children? what do you say to parents who have eliminated certain foods/dyes and seen a change in behavior? oh, wait a minute, i know what you say to them you already said it - Get Real. Get Educated by a university. If you believe this food dye nonsense then you must have failed chemistry, don't make that my problem.


Posted by: quark | June 6, 2008 11:28 AM | Report abuse

What do the studies show? It depends how they're designed.
For example. Most kids can roll around in grass and don't get hives. I do. Since most people aren't allergic to grass, does that mean I'm not either?
Most kids don't have a problem with dyes, but some do...

Posted by: Toni | June 6, 2008 11:47 AM | Report abuse

Another one of these correlation-causation things. Processed foods tend to include artificial dyes, etc - they also contain a lot of low-grade carbohydrates that can cause blood sugar spikes, and it's really hard to establish what what the active factor is from reading a lot of anecdotes from parents. There may be some controlled studies out there on specific substances, but checking whether your tortilla chips or cookies or soda contain some specific chemical compound that you believe to be the villain is probably less useful than either not eating them at all or making sure they're accompanied by real food in a calming environment (i.e. not on the run). The human metabolism was not designed to run on sugar compounds.

Posted by: lurker | June 6, 2008 11:47 AM | Report abuse

I am in total agreement about food dyes. Why do we need them? So we aren't eating some over-processed brown yuck? Don't eat it! Almost all cheese is NOT yellow. Very few are naturally.

Ask ANY teacher if food dyes affect their students. Yes! Red is the worst and I do NOT care that the FDA doesn't agree. They are under huge amount of pressure by the food lobbiests. Think about the Food Pyramid. NO food scientist agrees that it is a healthy way to eat, but the bread and dairy lobbiests are powerful.

We try to eat natural foods when we can. The kids get enough bad stuff at parties. Dyes DO make a difference.

Posted by: 2Stormy | June 6, 2008 12:08 PM | Report abuse

i guess what amuses me is the idea that some people can't eat foods with msg is totally ok but somehow food dyes are different.
a whole lot of phd scientists did not believe that a bateria caused ulcers. while that is an accepted idea now, 15 years ago that was heresy. everybody with a brain (and/or a college degree that passed chemistry) knew that bateria did not cause ulcers.

Posted by: quark | June 6, 2008 12:18 PM | Report abuse

Think for a minute, you brain surgeons. Foods contains lots of other additives or ingredients besides dye. Sugar, salt, caffeine, preservatives, hormones fed to animals like chickens and beef to get them to market quicker. The kids gets hyper at the movies? What kind of movie is he/she watching -- scarey, violent, science fiction, or Disney? Are there other kids in the theatre? A lot of things can be blamed for a kid's behaviour and physical condition. Are all the meals eaten in the backseat of a car while mom or dad is spewing at the current traffic jam or engrossed in a Blackberry conversation? (One writer at the Washington Pest even blamed the plastic lining on pizza boxes and popcorn tubs for obese children. It's not the lining on the container, it's the pizza and popcorn inside! DUH!) Maybe it's genetic. Do you have an Uncle who bounces off the walls, too? Maybe you just aren't capable of producing a normal, healthy child. Stop believe the tripe put out in 'studies' and pay attention to your own kid, for Pete's sake.

Posted by: Anonymous | June 6, 2008 12:41 PM | Report abuse

Why should anything be banned that causes a non-life threatening reaction in a very small subset of the population? Look at this from a reality perspective. Do you really want to see M&Ms change? What fun would the Easter basket be without brightly colored jelly beans? How about colorless snow cones? I am not advocating a steady diet of these treats but in moderation they are fun and part of the magic of childhood. Please don't suggest taking that away from my kids who are unaffected by food coloring.

Posted by: science mom | June 6, 2008 12:47 PM | Report abuse

Stop believe the tripe put out in 'studies' and pay attention to your own kid, for Pete's sake.

Posted by: | June 6, 2008 12:41 PM

but the whole thing dcer was saying was that there aren't any studies that prove food dyes cause problems. so do you agree that food dyes can cause problems or do you not.
i'm not saying that food dyes should be banned any more than i think gluten should be banned. i'm not even saying they're evil. i think they're unnecessary. my son doesn't seem to have a problem with food dyes but i still try to keep them from his diet.

Posted by: quark | June 6, 2008 1:04 PM | Report abuse

Ask ANY teacher if food dyes affect their students.
-----

ha.

My son's teacher let a parent give the kids Mountain Dew to drink because they pay no attention to that stuff. Ask a teacher? I'd rather ask the mailman, he's just as qualified to know.

Posted by: DCer | June 6, 2008 1:15 PM | Report abuse

DCer,

It is not just anecdotal evidence. There is empirical evidence that a small (20-30%) percentage of individuals have food sensitivities. Not all do. Probably your kids don't. Not sugar, that has no empirical evidence. But artificial food dyes, casein, gluten--all food for whom some children and adults have a sensitivity. As another poster said--if your child has trouble, try it for two weeks. If it helps, great, if it doesn't, no harm done. Google food reaction and behavior in children.

Posted by: Anonymous | June 6, 2008 1:26 PM | Report abuse

"Ask any preschool teacher. SHe'll tell you that the food additive reactions are real. Kids who are wired on artificial flavors, dyes and colors behave differently."
Yeah, because teachers all have advanced medicine degrees and/or are experts in human nutrition.

Posted by: 21117 | June 6, 2008 1:35 PM | Report abuse

Gosh, 21117, Get Real, and trolls, y'all are so chipper today. What happened, did you run over a baby squirrel on your way to work?

This is why I've pretty much stopped posting on these blogs. Or I'll post but don't check back. Anyone with facts, opinions or thoughts may be attacked at any point just for fun. I work with attorneys and I deal with the "devil's advocate" thing all day long, but at least they're human. Some of the folks posting here wouldn't qualify.

Posted by: WorkingMomX | June 6, 2008 1:58 PM | Report abuse

Yeah, because teachers all have advanced medicine degrees and/or are experts in human nutrition.

Posted by: 21117 | June 6, 2008 1:35 PM

because we know that people with advanced medicine degrees and/or are experts in human nutrition never make mistakes. see my comment above about ulcers.

Posted by: Anonymous | June 6, 2008 2:00 PM | Report abuse

You'll be surprised to know a lot of doctors and people with advanced medical degrees don't know much about nutrition. It's not a part of their medical training. A lot of them don't know CPR, either, so don't have a heart attack in your podiatrist's office. Doctors are human just like the rest of us. They are not gods, although many think they are. A lot of the ills of the elderly can be traced to poor nutrition because they don't bother to eat healthy meals.

Posted by: Got an A in Nutrition | June 6, 2008 2:17 PM | Report abuse

Google food reaction and behavior in children.

-------

Did you want me to? The first site makes money promoting food reactions and on that first page there were half a dozen junk sites.

Posted by: dcer | June 6, 2008 2:40 PM | Report abuse

Posted by: DCer | June 6, 2008 2:43 PM | Report abuse

I agree with science- I don't see reason why these products should be banned.

But I have been affected by various dyes and additives so I know it's "real."

As for tantrums, half of them are spoiled kids, and half of them are just tired and hungry and sadly dealing with clueless parents who expect too much of them.

Posted by: Liz D | June 6, 2008 2:53 PM | Report abuse

"...Mom's chose their children over having a career and TWO Lexuses in the garage"

Sometimes, moms choose to educate their children, and to insist on proper language usage.

Posted by: Mom is chose? | June 6, 2008 3:22 PM | Report abuse

I'll start here instead:
http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~lrd/colorfac.html

Posted by: DCer | June 6, 2008 2:43 PM

and we all know that the government doesn't use or manipulate science to further its political agenda - see the gov sites on global warming. so no thank you. i'll just say no to the fda & go with what i've seen/felt/observed personally.

Posted by: quark | June 6, 2008 4:59 PM | Report abuse

This one comes up every couple of years with older son because of his autism. We've tried changing his diet, but it made no difference. We've seen some of his peers really benefit, though. So, my conclusion is that *some* kids are affected by diet. Seems reasonable.

Like several other people have already mentioned about their kids, younger son turns into a cranky-machine if he's hungry. Once DH and I figured out the cause/pattern, instead of (over-)correcting bad behavior, we'll ask when he last ate, and what he ate. Then, if the problem is likely caused by hunger or low blood sugar, we give him a snack and watch him turn back into his normal sweet, charming self.

Posted by: Sue | June 6, 2008 6:09 PM | Report abuse

I don't have kids.

BUT I took a rescue cat from an old lady. When she came to me she'd been treated at a vet for a skin condition, she was grossly obese because apparently the little old lady fed her the equivalent of kitty-cat junk food at least twice a day to make up for lack of space in her home and her lack of true affection for a companion animal (her daughter said 'mom does not let the cats on the furniture." I thought, how the hell do you accomplish that? Yelling at them at lot)

Between exercise and a high-quality dye-free* dry pet food, she's become a normal-sized cat, and the skin condition is long past.

*we got a sample coupon for something that had dyes in it and brought it home. Her skin condition flourished again and we stopped that stuff.

Posted by: dragonet2 | June 7, 2008 1:20 AM | Report abuse

i'll just say no to the fda & go with what i've seen/felt/observed personally.
----------
My mother gave me a polished rock to keep by my bed to keep the monsters away when I was a kid. I kept that stone by my bed and every morning I'd wake up and the monsters wouldn't have "gotten" me, so I kept that stone there. Eventually I forgot about it, but my mother always used it as an example of how we can fool ourselves.

It wasn't the stone that saved me from monsters, it's that there weren't monsters.

Posted by: Anonymous | June 7, 2008 10:52 AM | Report abuse

What is a problem is this article you should be writing about better things to help moms. You missed the number one thing our book club of 37 moms covet's and that is a novel we all loved (and trust me that never happens)--THE BOOK OF MOM, by Taylor Wislhire. It is without the doubt the best book for mom's it should be a requirement. It is the perfect summer read, laugh out loud funny that you can't put down about a mom that burns out, is stuck in her marriage and how she gets her self back. Packed with Oprah-like slef help tools, marriage counceling and the funniest things we do as mom's this book is something that you should be talking about. Have you read it?

Posted by: wendy | June 7, 2008 8:29 PM | Report abuse

My mother gave me a polished rock to keep by my bed to keep the monsters away when I was a kid. I kept that stone by my bed and every morning I'd wake up and the monsters wouldn't have "gotten" me, so I kept that stone there. Eventually I forgot about it, but my mother always used it as an example of how we can fool ourselves.


there are a good many people who are affected by msg. do you believe that msg causes problems with those people or is that an example of people fooling themselves? if you believe that msg causes problems with some people why is it too big a step for you to believe that food dyes can cause problems in some people?

Posted by: Anonymous | June 9, 2008 8:53 AM | Report abuse

seems to me that most people/kids will have some reaction to some things and not others. some kids react to scary movies, others to additives in food.

just figure out which causes what and go from there.

it's not big deal.

Posted by: NALL92 | June 9, 2008 10:13 AM | Report abuse

if you believe that msg causes problems with some people why is it too big a step for you to believe that food dyes can cause problems in some people?
------------

I don't "believe" that MSG causes all the problems people says it does. I had a girlfriend who would buy the cheap $2.99 lunch special in college and blamed MSG for her weight gain. I bought it hook like and sinker until I realized that deep-friend, cholesterific, and heavily sugared sweet and sour pork was probably 1200 calories and totally messing up her system on fat and sugar alone, MSG probably had nothing to do with it.

But what I "believe" or don't believe doesn't have any affect on the truth.

Posted by: Anonymous | June 9, 2008 11:55 AM | Report abuse

But what I "believe" or don't believe doesn't have any affect on the truth.

doesn't it? are you sure about that?

Posted by: quark | June 9, 2008 12:24 PM | Report abuse

when i talk about msg, i'm not talking about 1000 calorie chinese food. i'm talking about other prepared food products that have amorliezed yeast product (i think that's the spelling) in it which is another word for msg.
there are people who have issues with all kinds of ingredients. what you're saying to me is that unless an issue with a product has been documented then you don't believe it is "true".


seems to me that most people/kids will have some reaction to some things and not others. some kids react to scary movies, others to additives in food.

just figure out which causes what and go from there.

it's not big deal.

Posted by: NALL92 | June 9, 2008 10:13 AM

i think that is what those of us who have seen and/or experienced a reaction to food dyes are saying. i don't know why the people who don't believe that food dyes cause a problem are so threatened by those of us who believe that for some people food dyes are an issue.

Posted by: quark | June 9, 2008 12:45 PM | Report abuse

i don't know why the people who don't believe that food dyes cause a problem are so threatened by those of us who believe that for some people food dyes are an issue.
----------

Gee, why might you think that?

Maybe it's because in 1975 one of my mother's nemeses on the PTA tried to get the school to BAN parents from bringing in anything with "red dye" in it! I remember being the family on the block that was allowed to eat grapes during that strike and that was weird enough.

Peanut allergies became a hot button issue and now, even though my son loves them, neither his school, his daycare, nor now his summer camp will allow us to give him a peanut butter sandwich.

The camp said we could substitute a tree nut butter sandwich and me, the big genius, says, "what's the difference between tree nut and peanut allergies, really?" and so now tree nut butter (cashew butter) sandwiches are similarly banned.

So are you honestly telling me that the anti-dye people aren't pushing to have dyes removed from all food? Because I can tell you with certainty that they are.

Posted by: Anonymous | June 9, 2008 2:11 PM | Report abuse

"I don't "believe" that MSG causes all the problems people says it does."

I don't know what people claim MSG does, but I know for me it is a primary migraine trigger. It's just a fact of my body.

Posted by: Liz D | June 9, 2008 4:32 PM | Report abuse

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