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Smiles, Crocs and Cholesterol

The news is filled with lots of tidbits this week. So, for today, put your hand in the grab bag and pull a few out:

First, the good news. Baby's first smiles are great for mom. Now, I'm fairly certain that most moms could've told you this without a study, but hey, science confirms it. When a mom sees her baby smile, it prompts a biological pleasure reaction in mom akin to the response derived from sex or food. The study, by scientists at the Baylor College of Medicine, appears in this month's Pediatrics. Also good news, though surprising for the scientists: A child's crying doesn't cause the corrollary negative effects of smiling. Instead, moms responded to all baby crying about the same.

Now, the bad news. Crocs are STILL bad for kids. On June 4, a 3-year-old wearing Crocs got her foot caught in an escalator at Atlanta's Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport. Three of the girl's toes were injured; mom Alison Cox Pregliasco is suing the maker of the shoes for knowingly selling an unsafe product. Last July, the folks who run the Metro in Washington issued warnings about an increase in soft-soled shoe accidents on its escalators. Metro has escalator safety guidelines on its site that are practical for any escalator: Ride in the middle rather than the sides, where "loose shoe laces, rubber boots and baggy clothes can get caught in the moving parts of the escalator"; no strollers with children on the escalators; and step over the combplate rather than dragging or sliding your feet off the escalator's edge.

And finally, your child's next checkup at the doctor may include a cholesterol screening. The American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Nutrition issued new guidelines that recommends cholesterol screening for all kids with heart disease risk factors. Screening should start at age 2 and no later than age 10, the new guidelines say. One other new recommendation from the AAP: Toddlers who are overweight or for whom obesity is a concern, including those with family histories of obesity, can now start drinking low- or reduced-fat milk instead of whole milk at 12 months rather than at 2.

By Stacey Garfinkle |  July 8, 2008; 7:00 AM ET  | Category:  Babies , Preschoolers , Safety
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Comments


First!

Posted by: First Comment | July 8, 2008 7:58 AM | Report abuse

"mom Alison Cox Pregliasco is suing the maker of the shoes for knowingly selling an unsafe product."

Say bye-bye to shoelaces, Velcro rocks!

PS. If you want to teach your kid how to tie a bow knot, sign him up for Boy Scouts.

Posted by: Whacky Weasel | July 8, 2008 7:58 AM | Report abuse

"mom Alison Cox Pregliasco is suing the maker of the shoes for knowingly selling an unsafe product."

This is utter BS. How about if the daughter sues mom for knowingly putting unsafe shoes on her (the daughter's) feet? Hello, personal accountability, anyone? Everyone knows that Crocs are not safe, and if people choose to wear them or let their kids wear them, they have to take responsibility for what happens.

Posted by: WorkingMomX | July 8, 2008 8:15 AM | Report abuse

Responsibility for our actions?! Just where do you think we live?

Posted by: Anonymous | July 8, 2008 8:34 AM | Report abuse

I'm sure the mom was weighing the safety issues of Crocs when she bought 'em, too.
What happened was, after the accident, she Googled some stories about it, and THEN decided they were unsafe.

My kids have never owned a pair of crocs. And not for safety reasons. Simply b/c I don't buy into the "these are the cutest shoes ever" marketing hype.

On the other topic---how long until we start putting 2 and 3 year olds on Lipitor? We'll just add that to the pharmacopeia being pushed on our kids already. Here's an idea----let's reinstate diet and exercise, and leave the drugs to the cases that REALLY need them.

Posted by: Dadof2 | July 8, 2008 8:41 AM | Report abuse

"Everyone knows that Crocs are not safe"

WorkingMomX, I for one, had no idea that Crocs weren't safe, and I think making a statement like the one above is ignorant.

Posted by: blonde mom with large breast | July 8, 2008 8:45 AM | Report abuse

Everyone knows that Crocs are not safe"

WorkingMomX, I for one, had no idea that Crocs weren't safe, and I think making a statement like the one above is ignorant.

Posted by: blonde mom with large breast | July 8, 2008 8:45 AM

Seriously? Stories have been on the Net and in the news, even on this website (and I believe also blogged about), for a good year. I'm siding with WorkingMomX on this one. Oh, I don't even have kids and I know!

Posted by: Also blonde, but not a mom. | July 8, 2008 8:54 AM | Report abuse

Everyone should know by now that crocs aren't safe in all situations.

This information has been on the news, both TV, radio and internet umpteen times!!! Everyone needs to pay attention to the news, not just to the stuff that interests them.

Posted by: Barbara | July 8, 2008 8:59 AM | Report abuse

Dadof2

"What happened was, after the accident, she Googled some stories about it, and THEN decided they were unsafe."

Probably. The mother is a lawyer...

Posted by: Anonymous | July 8, 2008 9:05 AM | Report abuse

Was the mother on the cell phone when her croc daughter got hurt?

Posted by: Anonymous | July 8, 2008 9:12 AM | Report abuse

Crocs? The only kinda' Crocs that I knows about is that there kind that we shoot in the swamp!

Posted by: Jed Clampett | July 8, 2008 9:19 AM | Report abuse

Until a month ago, I didn't even know what Crocs were, much less their safety record.

Posted by: blonde dad with large hands | July 8, 2008 9:19 AM | Report abuse

There was a newstory on Metro riders last summer, it showed all the shoes torn and eaten up by the escalators at the Metro stations. It was a pile of flip flops, cheap sandals and crocs, all soft-soled shoes, which is exactly why the warning is there.

Hopefully the 3 year old's mother will have her case thrown out.

Posted by: Siggy | July 8, 2008 9:40 AM | Report abuse

Crocs are no more or less safe than flip flops or jellies or any other shoe like that. Maybe we should outlaw escalators instead, they hurt more people than crocs. That woman is stupid and should be run out of town!

Posted by: moxiemom | July 8, 2008 9:40 AM | Report abuse

I won't buy crocs because I think they're absolutely hideous, but I also think that mom is an idiot.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 8, 2008 9:46 AM | Report abuse

Jed, they don't have crocs of that variety in your neck of the woods. Maybe 'gators, although I kind of doubt that, too - you're from the hills, not the swamps, durn-burn-it!

(Anybody see the story yesterday about the mom and four kids getting kicked off the plane for being unruly? See the interview about how it wasn't their fault? There's a shock for you.)

Posted by: m2j5c2 | July 8, 2008 9:48 AM | Report abuse

One important clarification on the AAP guidelines: AAP notes that reduced-fat milk may be used for the 1-2 year old kids "for whom overweight or obesity is a concern or who have a family history of obesity, dyslipidemia, or CVD." Children with no familial obesity issues and no apparent tendency themselves should continue to drink whole milk until age two. Please consult with your doctor before switching your child's milk.

Note to WaPo.com: Fat is essential to the development of healthy kids, so please be careful when telling parents that reduced-fat products may be used at an early age.

Posted by: To clarify | July 8, 2008 9:49 AM | Report abuse

For once I have to agree with WorkingMomX. Whatever happened to personal responsibility? Smokers blame cigarette makers for their cancer; fat people blame McDonald's for their obesity; some dumb chick spills hot coffee on herself and sues the fast food place that sold it to her. Get a grip, people. Unless you live in a hermetically sealed plastic bubble, everything you come in contact can hurt you. Just use a little common sense. Oh, sorry, forgot who I was addressing. People who blog for advice from complete strangers obviously have no common sense.

For one that, that mother in Georgia could have bought decent shoes for her kid. Crocs, jellies and flip=flops have no place out in public. They're ugly, bad for your feet, and cheesy. Period.

Posted by: Get a Life, People | July 8, 2008 9:58 AM | Report abuse

Crocs, gators, all the sames to me. We skins 'um and eats 'um.

And yessup, I done did travel to the swamps with my firstest cousin once.

Posted by: Jed Clampett | July 8, 2008 9:59 AM | Report abuse

Get a Life, I'm wounded. I thought this was, in fact, the second time we'd agreed on something.

Posted by: WorkingMomX | July 8, 2008 10:00 AM | Report abuse

To Clarify: Thanks for your comment. I've clarified the entry.

Posted by: Stacey Garfinkle | July 8, 2008 10:12 AM | Report abuse

I'm not into Crocs - but I'd like to add that many people go through their days without riding escalators all the time.

So the notion that some shoes aren't safe on escalators isn't necessarily common knowledge.

Posted by: RoseG | July 8, 2008 10:14 AM | Report abuse

Re: Crocs -- I refuse to buy these for my son also (he's 3), but he always slips on a pair of his cousin's (also 3) when we visit his house.

To me, they just seem like loose-fitting shoes for active kids. I can't imagine they are very good for foot development? I cringe when I see kids at the playground wearing flip flops and crocs. Whatever happened to a good-fitting, supportive pair of tennis shoes? Seems safer to me.

Posted by: SJR | July 8, 2008 10:20 AM | Report abuse

Maybe I'm remembering incorrectly, but I believe McDonald's lost that case because they kept the coffee at a temperature way above the norm for hot coffee, creating an unsafe situation. But the award was also reduced because the customer should expect the coffee to be hot.

Posted by: Coffee? | July 8, 2008 10:24 AM | Report abuse

I don't think everyone knows crocs are not safe. They don't come with a warning when you purchase them. Consumers expect that when they use the escalator their shoes won't cause their feet to be eaten by the escalator. If there is a risk, manufactures are legally obligated to warn of it.

Personal responsiblity is one thing. But how can you take personal responsibility if you had no idea crocs had this risk?

Let me read Crocs response to the escalator incidents:

"Crocs shoes are completely safe. ... Escalators and moving sidewalks, particularly those that have not received proper care and maintenance, can be dangerous and pose risks to their riders"

In other words, it's not us, it's the escalators. You think this lawsuit should be dismissed when the company is out there telling folks Crocs are compeletely safe?

As for McDonald's coffee, I think people point to that case too much as an example. If you google mcdonald's coffee, you'll find a lot of interesting facts about the case you never knew.

Posted by: Cliff | July 8, 2008 10:25 AM | Report abuse

Stats for Staceys OP blog From beginning to date:

12587 posts on 199 different topics were submitted by 3309 unique names.

Besides the anonymous troll chiming in with 1878 posts, Our top contributers are listed below:
50 Arlington Dad
52 John L
53 HappyDad
53 rebecca
56 sarah
58 Father of 4
63 Kate
64 StudentMom
68 Army Brat
68 Stacey Garfinkle
71 Kat
73 reston, va
76 atb
85 NewSAHM
87 atlmom
99 Bob
99 Ryan
101 sue
145 DCer
147 Moxiemom
169 WorkingMomX
189 David S
211 Liz D
213 pATRICK
266 foamgnome

Posted by: Blog Stats | July 8, 2008 10:28 AM | Report abuse

Blog Stats

"Besides the anonymous troll chiming in with 1878 posts, Our top contributers are listed below:"

Where is Fred, the nitwit? These stats aren't kosher.

Posted by: GC | July 8, 2008 10:32 AM | Report abuse

Regarding statins for children--you need to actually read the guidelines and I wish the media was clearer and not into sensational headlines. Medications are a last resort. The guidelines discuss diet and exercise as a first line. There are genetic syndromes of dyslipidemias (high fat and cholesterol) where cholesterol can get as high several hundred and other syndromes where the triglycerides are several thousands. Those children have to be on statin drugs because diet and exercise won't fix it. For other children who are obese/overweight with elevated cholesterol, diet and exercise go a long way. Drugs should only be used if diet and exercise are not working. I do think the guidelines are useful to get pediatricians thinking of screening for cholesterol which is helpful with couseling families. I would think that a parent would be spurred to action if they were told their kid had a cholesterol of 250--as a parent I would be mortified and worried.

And the issue of obesity in our society is really complex. I wish it were just watch what you eat and be active. For many children, they live in households with overweight parents and bad eating habits. You have to change the habits of the entire family--even if others in the household are normal weight. And, there are a lot of factors conspiring against all of us--food manufacturers using cheap unhealty fats, restaurants using the bad fats liberally in food and outsized portions, fast food restaurants with cheap, large portions, etc. We all need to be taught what a portion is because our views on portion size has been warped. Until we change society, our attitudes, impose rules and regs on manufactureres and restaurants (yep, we need to do that), then obesity will continue to kill lots of people and increase our healthcare costs beyond what we can pay as a society.

Posted by: pediatrician | July 8, 2008 10:38 AM | Report abuse

No matter whether she won or lost the coffee case, it's only common sense not to spill that stuff on you then blame somebody else.

I recall a matter several years ago where a child, wearing a flame retardant nightgown, was burned badly and the mother sued the maker of the night gown. However, the child was PLAYING WITH A CIGARETTE LIGHTER WHEN SHE WAS BURNED. Now, whose fault is that?

Posted by: Anonymous | July 8, 2008 10:39 AM | Report abuse

Really? More than ArmyBrat?

I'm touched, but I'm also pretty sure there used to be someone else posting as Kat.

Also, Crocs are ugly and every parent ought to read the Consumerist on a daily basis, if only for common sense stories like those about Crocs, baby seat recalls, and so forth.

My husband and I were skeptical of Crocs wayyyy before they were ever documented as unsafe, just because they were so...unfortunate looking. In my part of Los Angeles, whole families wear them so they can "match".

Posted by: Kat | July 8, 2008 10:40 AM | Report abuse

All buildings accessible to the public are covered by liability insurance for these types of freak accidents. If mom wants to sue anybody, she should go after the airport. I don't blame her either, she probably got a bill from the surgeon for thousands, and her daughter will have to suffer the damage from the accident the rest of her life.

Posted by: accidents happen | July 8, 2008 10:41 AM | Report abuse

Wow, Blog Stats, interesting to see that many of the top posters are also OB top posters. Actually, I already knew that, but OB OB Go Away troll should put that in its pipe and smoke it.

On topic. Yes, I love my baby's smile, and her cry makes me want to help her, not kill her. Darwin and all. I knew the milk thing already. Good pediatrician and all. I love me some flip flops, but I'm not 3 and can stay out of the escalator parts. Good common sense and all.

Posted by: atb | July 8, 2008 10:42 AM | Report abuse

to pediatrician:

Thank you! People love that snarky response of "eat less, exercise more, duh", but it's based on so much more than that.

My father's father died at 300+ lbs. My father is under 300, but still obese, even though he constantly diets and bikes to work (about 10 miles) every day.

My mother has been body building since I could remember, but her entire family (except her late father) is obese. Her late father, though slim his whole life, had record-setting cholesterol. A lot of her family's eating habits were influenced by the fact that they were all athletes in the Midwest in college, and thought fried bread was a food group, and didn't know how to eat healthier when they grew older and more sedentary.

As for me, I grew up with two parents who didn't know how to eat well, and then married someone who is naturally thin but with horrific eating habits (his sister, also naturally thin, has sky-high cholesterol and must take medicine constantly to keep it down). I'm a lot more shapely than either of my parents, but I haven't been under 200 lbs since college when I was on Atkins and dancing 6 hours a week, even when I had chronic appendicitis and couldn't eat for two months. On the other hand, even when I was on Atkins, my cholesterol was low, and sometimes unhealthily low.

I know a lot of people will read this and think "whine, whine whine", but it really is a variety of factors, and it's not as though all overweight people are sedentary slobs with nothing better to do than stuff their faces.

/sermon

Posted by: Kat | July 8, 2008 10:53 AM | Report abuse

Kat, to be fair to Army Brat, 23 posts were made under the name of Armybrat which probably has something to do with the On Balance registration that didn't allow for spaces. There are a few things a computer can't do, and lying is one of them.

Posted by: Blog Stats | July 8, 2008 10:53 AM | Report abuse

I wasn't accusing the computer of lying; I was pointing out that if you look at the IP's of all the people that posted of Kat, you would find at least some did not come from Southern California, and most of those would be from before the date that I had started posting.

It's not a critique, it's just me being specific.

Posted by: Blog Stats | July 8, 2008 10:55 AM | Report abuse

Crocs are not unsafe... if they were, they would have been forced to do a recall. If you do stupid things on an escalator, you're going to get hurt... your fault... the end. It comes down to personal accountability and teaching your kids basic safety. When I was growing up, we didn't have safety labels on anything, but I'm still alive. Why? Because people used to have something called common sense.

Posted by: Ridiculous | July 8, 2008 11:01 AM | Report abuse

And... why isn't the mom suing the airport or the escalator manufacturer (for making unsafe escalators)? Oh yeah, I forgot, because they have less money than a big company like Crocs. Let's look at the facts: 77 escalator entrapments reported last year, out of which I think 3 were Crocs related. The common denominator? ESCALATORS. Haha. I have worn Crocs for years, and *sigh*, on escalators, but somehow never managed to get my foot stuck.

Posted by: Ridiculous | July 8, 2008 11:09 AM | Report abuse

Long skirts, long coats and scarves are also dangerous on escalators. Shall we ban those too?

Posted by: Anonymous | July 8, 2008 11:22 AM | Report abuse

Kat

"I know a lot of people will read this and think "whine, whine whine",

Uh, huh.


"but it really is a variety of factors, and it's not as though all overweight people are sedentary slobs with nothing better to do than stuff their faces."

Uh, huh.

Posted by: Stating the obvious | July 8, 2008 11:24 AM | Report abuse

Check out the croc shoes' ad on this page...

Posted by: Funny! | July 8, 2008 11:35 AM | Report abuse

Ridiculous -

How long have you worked for Crocs?

Posted by: Cliff | July 8, 2008 11:50 AM | Report abuse

The Jed Clampett thing was getting stale 2 articles ago.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 8, 2008 11:53 AM | Report abuse

@Cliff

Ok, because I am using logic that must mean I work for the company? Tisk tisk. I read the press release from the lawfirm, and I think it is "ridiculous." Haha. It's just sad that people in this country like to sue companies for selfish reasons, using their kids as the selling point. Makes me sick, really.

Posted by: Ridiculous | July 8, 2008 12:08 PM | Report abuse

Did the study look at the effect of baby's smiles and cries on dads too? Or is this yet another selective endorsement of the power of motherhood?

Posted by: Dads? | July 8, 2008 12:08 PM | Report abuse

would the anon at 11:53 rather hear from Miss Jane or, heaven forbid, Mrs. Drysdale?

Posted by: Anonymous | July 8, 2008 12:12 PM | Report abuse

"Did the study look at the effect of baby's smiles and cries on dads too?"


Yes.

The dads hide at work, in the garage, in the bathroom, in front of online porn, and behind the paper when their babies cry.

The dads do the same things as above when their babies smile.

Posted by: Analyze this | July 8, 2008 12:17 PM | Report abuse

Analyze this, let me guess - your husband left you for someone nicer?

Posted by: Question | July 8, 2008 12:23 PM | Report abuse

I just love when little precious smiles at hubby and me. It is a gift from heaven.

But Crocs are a gift from h-e-double hockey sticks!

Posted by: Cecilia | July 8, 2008 12:29 PM | Report abuse

Crocs? The only kinda' Crocs that I knows about is that there kind that we shoot in the swamp!

Posted by: Jed Clampett | July 8, 2008 9:19 AM

Hey, Jed, do they taste like chicken? Or weasel?

On topic: my daughter has some faux Crocs and doesn't like them. She loves flip-flops, which are only a smidgen safer than Crocs in my opinion.

Posted by: theoriginalmomof2 | July 8, 2008 12:35 PM | Report abuse

if life were only about safety, none of you moms would were heels. But since footwear is about fashion, it is a whole different kettle of fish.

having said that, I love my crocs. They are comfortable and don't slip or sweat. I buy the crocs that look more like mary janes.

Posted by: lovemycroc | July 8, 2008 12:58 PM | Report abuse

"if life were only about safety, none of you moms would were heels."

Spelling police!

Posted by: Anonymous | July 8, 2008 1:00 PM | Report abuse

I know that Crocs are unsafe on escalators, but my 4 yr old son still has a pair.
Why?
1) After swimming lessons, he just slips these on and we head home.
2) They're handy for camping and long car trips (he likes to take his shoes off)
3) Any other quick errand where he wants to go outside briefly or will be getting wet.

Otherwise he wears tennis shoes. I prefer that he wears tennis shoes, but I don't think they're inherently evil or horribly ugly shoes.

Posted by: MadisonMama | July 8, 2008 1:32 PM | Report abuse

"if life were only about safety, none of you moms would were heels."

Gets the subjunctive right, but misses the spelling? Sounds fishy to me.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 8, 2008 1:33 PM | Report abuse

actually, crocs are good for your feet as they mold to your feet shapr and provide better suport. My podiatrist suggested that I wear them whenever possible.

Posted by: crocs | July 8, 2008 1:35 PM | Report abuse

I'm all for unsafe things for kids (& adults), because it lowers the reproductive rate of the ones who lack common sense.

Posted by: Darwin | July 8, 2008 1:38 PM | Report abuse

My son loves his crocs because they have great traction and allow him to climb up the slides at the playground, which really drives all the safety-first mamas crazy. It's a two-fer, you can't beat that.

Posted by: babycroc | July 8, 2008 1:52 PM | Report abuse

My son loves his crocs because they have great traction and allow him to climb up the slides at the playground, which really drives all the safety-first mamas crazy. It's a two-fer, you can't beat that.

Posted by: babycroc | July 8, 2008 1:52 PM | Report abuse


"LONDON, July 7 (UPI) -- Toddlers who say "yuck" when given flavorful foreign food may be exhibiting racist behavior, a British government-sponsored organization says.

The London-based National Children's Bureau released a 366-page guide counseling adults on recognizing racist behavior in young children, The Telegraph reported Monday.

The guide, titled Young Children and Racial Justice, warns adults that babies must also be included in the effort to eliminate racism because they have the ability to "recognize different people in their lives."

The bureau says to be aware of children who "react negatively to a culinary tradition other than their own by saying 'yuck'."

"Racist incidents among children in early years settings tend to be around name-calling, casual thoughtless comments and peer group relationships," the guide says.

Staff members are advised not to ignore racist actions and to condemn them when they occur. "

Welcome to liberal PC out of control. Like this kind of nonsense? You will love Obama and his crowd.

Posted by: say no to liberal nutjobs | July 8, 2008 1:55 PM | Report abuse

To be tellin' the truth, gator really don't taste much like anythin' It is all white meat that be tougher than a turtle back and sinew-eee likes a ball of string.

That's a-why we don't make gator flambeau. Weasel meat is much, much gooder for flambeau.

Posted by: Jed Clampett | July 8, 2008 1:55 PM | Report abuse

It is very sad about the children being injured while wearing the crocs. I find it difficult to believe that it is the fault of the shoes though. I see a lot of kids who don't lift up their feet when they walk which could be part of the problem.

My husband researched the best shoes for children when they were ready to walk. We buy only Preschoolians which he feels are the best for their development and safety. While they are expensive we feel it is a worthwhile expense.

Posted by: Donna | July 8, 2008 1:56 PM | Report abuse

kids who don't lift up their feet when they walk which could be part of the problem.
=============================================

that is because kids have been watching too much tv. You know watching people "moon walk" rather than march-- er I mean walk properly!

Posted by: Anonymous | July 8, 2008 2:09 PM | Report abuse

When I was a kid, 30 or 35 years ago, my mom bought me sneakers at a dept store and I wore them away from the counter as we went to leave the store. On the escalator I put my feet close to the step in front and my toes curled up the leading side of the upper step. When we reached the top of the escalator, the upper step slid down, taking a bite of my shoe with it (but not of me). So we have known for quite some time that escalator can be dangerous to feet and shoes if you aren't taking proper precautions. I don't buy my kids crocs, but I also make sure they don't put the toes of their shoes on the leading edge of an escalator step.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 8, 2008 2:33 PM | Report abuse

I got my shoelaces caught in an escalator once when I was a kid, it scared the crap out of me. Fortunately someone hit the emergency stop button and we were able to pull them out.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 8, 2008 2:45 PM | Report abuse

"...but I also make sure they don't put the toes of their shoes on the leading edge of an escalator step."

OH no - a responsible adult. Say it isn't so.

Posted by: KLB SS MD | July 8, 2008 2:45 PM | Report abuse

I found the cholestrol testing bit interesting. Due to family history, my daughter had her first cholestrol check at 2. That was 6 years ago. She was high and so they advised we switch to 2% milk and come back in 6 months to check again. She was borderline at that point so we switched to skim milk. Her pediatrician says as long as she is at a good weight, eating healthy, and getting plenty of exercise there is no reason to check her again until puberty.

Posted by: 21117 | July 8, 2008 2:47 PM | Report abuse

"I found the cholestrol testing bit interesting. Due to family history, my daughter had her first cholestrol check at 2. "


Spelling police!!!

Posted by: Oh, brother | July 8, 2008 2:59 PM | Report abuse

Umm, have people forgotten how to use the stairs? Yeah, they're those things you walk up when you aren't an obese monster. Nuff said.

Posted by: wow | July 8, 2008 3:07 PM | Report abuse

Come now, wow. That's actually not possible coming up out of the Metro in many cases. Plus, kids love to ride things, escalators included. Not to mention I swear some places, particularly malls, don't even HAVE stairs anymore. I can't wait for moving sidewalks in malls. It's so hard to walk.

Posted by: atb | July 8, 2008 3:16 PM | Report abuse

spelling police keeps picking on simple typos. How about coming up with something interesting and/or provocative relating to either the topic or Jed's gator?

Posted by: keep it simple | July 8, 2008 3:18 PM | Report abuse

Actually pretty much every building in the U.S. is legally required to have stairs, it's called a fire exit, and it's open all the time for anyone who isn't too lazy to get some exercise.

Posted by: wow | July 8, 2008 3:27 PM | Report abuse

Donna, Thanks for the tip on the preschoolian shoes. I've been looking for something for my youngest daughter. She walks on her toes. Her heels don't come all the way down when she walks. The doctor said not to worry about it, but I'm thinking maybe her feet don't match 'normal'. I love the look of the SandWalkers.

Posted by: Anna | July 8, 2008 3:29 PM | Report abuse

Do you ever get the feeling that this is the same 6 people "talking" to each other?

Posted by: Who are you? | July 8, 2008 4:02 PM | Report abuse

wow- Don't escalators count as stairs? If they stop moving, they're stairs. Also, in your limited experience I assume you haven't seen that, in fact, many times those fire exits are locked such that you can go down, but not up. Keep trying!

Posted by: atb | July 8, 2008 4:11 PM | Report abuse

Donna, Thanks for the tip on the preschoolian shoes. I've been looking for something for my youngest daughter. She walks on her toes. Her heels don't come all the way down when she walks. The doctor said not to worry about it, but I'm thinking maybe her feet don't match 'normal'. I love the look of the SandWalkers.

Posted by: Anna | July 8, 2008 3:29 PM

CHECK FOR AUTISTIC SPECTRUM DISORDER,DON'T RELY ON PEDIATRICIAN, GO TO COUNTY "CHILD FIND" OR SIMILAR PROGRAM FOR PRESCHOOLERS. WALKING ON ONE'S TOES IS A SERIOUS SIGN. IT DOESN'T HURT TO CHECK.

Posted by: CHECK FOR AUTISTIC SPECTRUM DISORDER | July 8, 2008 4:42 PM | Report abuse

Anna,
I hope your little girl is ok and that you like the shoes as much as my children do.
We have just been very happy with all aspects of them.

Posted by: Donna | July 8, 2008 5:52 PM | Report abuse

"Plus, kids love to ride things, escalators included."

So true. My kid thinks escalators are the most exciting thing ever. He could spend a whole day going up and down them if I'd let him.

Posted by: babycrocs | July 8, 2008 6:01 PM | Report abuse

No matter whether she won or lost the coffee case, it's only common sense not to spill that stuff on you then blame somebody else.

I recall a matter several years ago where a child, wearing a flame retardant nightgown, was burned badly and the mother sued the maker of the night gown. However, the child was PLAYING WITH A CIGARETTE LIGHTER WHEN SHE WAS BURNED. Now, whose fault is that?

Posted by: | July 8, 2008 10:39 AM
---------------------------------

1. The coffee suit did indeed involve coffee that was several dozen degrees higher than what focus groups considered "hot." Something like 200 degrees, when a comfortable coffee temp was 150. 200 is really close to boiling for water. The lid was not put on properly by the person serving the coffee, and the consumer grasped the coffee near the top (because the server had his/her hand at the center of the cup), the top popped off, and burns ensued. 3rd-degree burns that required grafting of large portions of the legs. The consumer recovered not quite enough to cover her medical bills.

Most personal injury lawsuits don't involve large awards. Punitives are issued only in cases where a corporation is expected to pull a Pinto (let's decide if it's cheaper to pay lawsuits for dead customers rather than make the product safer).

Posted by: Mona | July 8, 2008 6:08 PM | Report abuse

"CHECK FOR AUTISTIC SPECTRUM DISORDER,DON'T RELY ON PEDIATRICIAN, GO TO COUNTY "CHILD FIND" OR SIMILAR PROGRAM FOR PRESCHOOLERS. WALKING ON ONE'S TOES IS A SERIOUS SIGN. IT DOESN'T HURT TO CHECK."

To Anna, I think this is rather alarmist. If you are seeing a pediatrician, then you are seeing someone who is an expert in child development. I don't know the age of your daughter, but a normal 2 year old could walk on their toes (though shouldn't all the time). If you have no other developmental concerns (she's understands you, says a few words at least, follows one step commands, plays with toys, smiles at you etc.) then I wouldn't worry. I don't think of Autism as the first thing with isolated toe walking. There are other things that it could be--like short heel cords due to musculoskeletal issues. If you are concerned, then ask to see a developmental pediatrician. Take advice from this list with a grain of salt.

Posted by: pediatrician | July 8, 2008 7:10 PM | Report abuse

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Posted by: Today's Count | July 8, 2008 8:20 PM | Report abuse

fr pediatrician:

>...I don't think of Autism as the first thing with isolated toe walking. There are other things that it could be--like short heel cords due to musculoskeletal issues...

SO true. It could also be just a temporary phase. I wonder if check thought of that.

Posted by: Alex | July 9, 2008 3:36 PM | Report abuse

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