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The Dangers Lurking in Pools

Four-year-old Rose Cozier is one of the lucky ones. Her arm got stuck in a backyard pool drain, but, as the girl turned purple and her eyes rolled back in her head, her mother was able to yank her out and the girl is recovering, according to CBS' The Early Show.

Many other kids aren't so lucky. Graeme Baker, the granddaughter of former Secretary of State James Baker was one of the unlucky ones. The seven-year-old girl died in her mother's arms while stuck to an underwater drain of a hot tub connected to a friend's pool.

"I kept pulling at her, never understanding what was holding her down and I couldn't pull her off," her mother, Nancy Baker, told ABC News. "I opened my eyes underwater and there aren't words to describe what this is like," she said, adding that the suction pressure holding the girl was later estimated at 700 pounds.

Drowning is the second-leading cause of injury death among children 14 years and younger, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports.

Baker's death led her grandfather and mother to battle for anti-entrapment drain covers on pools. The result of their fight, The Virginia Graeme Pool and Spa Safety Act, takes effect this December. The act requires that all public pool drain covers meet federal anti-entrapment safety standards.

So, what does that mean for swimmers? ABC News says that many hotels are not yet compliant with the coming law. For large public pools, though, compliance may be difficult to achieve.

Douglas Fox, the Aquatics Team Manager of the Montgomery County Department of Recreation, explained the dilemma. He wants his pools to be compliant, but county pools are large pools with custom-made, commercial-sized drains and grates. "I'm worried. I really am," he said. The law says that a grate needs to certified to meet the law, but he doesn't yet know what that means. However, the county's pools all do comply with another standard of the law, which requires pools to have more than one main drain. That way, if a person gets stuck on one, the other one takes over the work, essentially releasing the person.

Makers of grates and drains for commercial pools are still working on developing the products that large pools need. Larry Benz, the sales and technical manager for Lawson Aquatics Inc., which is a leading commercial drain and grate manufacturer, expects that his company will be the first out with the new grates in October.

In the meantime, all this work on large public pools won't help children who are swimming in existing pools and hot tubs at a house, unless those pool owners change their drain covers. Currently, the law does not require them to do that.

So, if you're going to a friend's house for a swim, check out the suction on the drain before letting any children near it.

By Stacey Garfinkle |  July 25, 2008; 7:00 AM ET  | Category:  Newsmakers
Previous: Moving: 719 Miles and a Million Questions | Next: Child on Board the Bike

Comments


Not only are Hot tubs a big money pit, there are all sorts of problems associated with their ownership. One of my neighbors down the street got one last year. The first time they went on vacation, they came home and found beer cans and wine bottles littering their back yard and used comdoms floating in the tub. Teenagers! You have to give them credit though, at least they were practicing safe sex.

Posted by: rub-a-dub-dub, teenagers will borrow your tub | July 25, 2008 8:00 AM | Report abuse

When I was a lifeguard 12 years ago in high school, I was also licensed as a pool operator. One of the requirements/regulations/laws for any pool was that no more than half of the suction should come from the main drain. At least the other 50% should come from other suction, usually the skimmers on the side.

If the side skimmers are severly clogged or isolated and most of your suction is coming from one drain, then that is not good.

A well designed grate over any main drain that reduces the possibility of a body completing blocking the flow is a good common sense measure.

Posted by: Common Sense Dad | July 25, 2008 8:11 AM | Report abuse

A point I should make, however, is that it is not essential that pools be completely reconfigured, or even that new grates be designed, regulated, and added.

The main point to take to the pool THIS AFTERNOON is that as long as all the side skimmers combined are clear of leaves, playing children, and are operating, then everyone will be fine.

This will give something for all the parents here to start demanding of the lifeguards.

Posted by: Common Sense Dad | July 25, 2008 8:15 AM | Report abuse

Hey Common Sense Dad, aren't the drains on the bottom of the pool? I am having trouble understanding how young children got to the drains in regular swimming pools, or are these all happening in hot tubs (gross) or kiddie pools?
Also, while this is sickeningly scary when you think of the type of injury, how often does it really happen? I can recall a couple of stories over the past dozen years or so, but that's it, and a quick Google search revealed 3 stories in addition to the two above for a total of 5 incidents nationwide. How many swimming pools are there in America? Hundreds of thousands, maybe millions if you include those above-ground jobs? I can think of dozens of other things to worry about that are much more likely to occur, so I think I'll go cut the grass to reduce the liklihood a poisonous snake coming into the yard...maybe I'll install meteor resistant roofing on the house while I'm at it.

Posted by: VaLGaL | July 25, 2008 8:35 AM | Report abuse

Ditto what VaLGaL said. Just how freakish is this occurrence? Honestly, if we had to actively protect our kids from every conceivable danger, we'd go mad. I assume Stacey's fear mongering is because there is nothing else to report on.

Posted by: atb | July 25, 2008 8:42 AM | Report abuse

Va Gal,

Yes, you're absolutely right. I'm not saying I'm losing sleep worrying about this. But the blog heading is decidedly inflamatory "Danger Danger" so I thought I would add a little bit of practical knowledge on the particular topic.

Yes, main drains are as far as I have ever seen at bottoms of pools, usually the deep end. Of course, it seems like alot of new pools really don't have deep ends like in the old days (or diving boards).

And no, this is very uncommon. I'm certain that in a statistical sense you'd be reap a far greater benefit by driving 10 mph slower to and from the pool then you would be to worry about this.

But like I said, this was the topic at hand.

Posted by: Common Sense Dad | July 25, 2008 8:43 AM | Report abuse

According to the CPSC:

"...the average number of drowning deaths involving children younger than 5 in pools and spas has increased from a yearly average of 267 (for 2002-2004) to 283 (for 2003-2005). The average number of emergency room treated pool and spa submersion injuries decreased from an annual average of 2,800 (for 2004-2006) to 2,700 (for 2005-2007). The report also shows that the majority of deaths and injuries occur in residential settings and involve children ages 1-2. Drowning is the leading cause of unintentional death to children ages 1-4."

While this is just general drowning numbers, further in the article is:

"New CPSC data also shows that between 1999 and 2007 there were 74 reported incidents involving entrapment, resulting in 9 deaths and 63 injuries. Six of the deaths occurred in pools and three occurred in spas and all of the deaths except for one involved children 14 or younger. These entrapment incidents involve being trapped by the force of suction at the drain and can occur because of a broken or missing outlet cover."

http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml08/08276.html

Why not nip it in the bud before more kids die?

Posted by: WDC 21113 | July 25, 2008 8:50 AM | Report abuse

How many babies are conceived in pools and hot tubs - especially those in private back yards?

Posted by: Pool safety | July 25, 2008 8:52 AM | Report abuse

Alright folks. I've changed the headline to be less inflammatory. That said, drownings are the second-leading cause of death in kids ages 1 to 14.

Posted by: Stacey Garfinkle | July 25, 2008 9:18 AM | Report abuse

I have to say it's nice to see a topic that isn't related to purchasing something for my kids. And while this isn't something I will actively fret over, it's good to be aware of the issue.

Posted by: mlc | July 25, 2008 9:22 AM | Report abuse

"I've changed the headline to be less inflammatory."

--I didn't mean to be critical. I apologize.

"...drownings are the second-leading cause of death in kids ages 1 to 14."

--Drownings, yes, but not necessarily entrapment drownings.

Anyway, I tend to pride myself in being far from overly protective or worrisome, but this is a legitimate topic to know something about. At the very least one might realize that if something like this is happening in a hot tub, simply turning off the jets should solve the problem. And, like we've now discussed, realize how your or your neighbor's home pool operates, and the importance of distributed suction.

I remind myself of Tony Soprano's line "When you're married you'll understand the importance of fresh produce!"

Posted by: Common Sense Dad | July 25, 2008 9:26 AM | Report abuse

According to the CPSC, in California alone, 11 children have been killed by furniture tip-overs between January of 1999 and June 2006. Eight of those involved kids aged 5 and under. In the same time period, 6 kids were killed by a falling TV -- all but one of those were under the age of 5.

Posted by: Another danger in the house | July 25, 2008 9:36 AM | Report abuse

"So, if you're going to a friend's house for a swim, check out the suction on the drain before letting any children near it."

How, exactly, do you do the first thing? My solution is just tell the kids to avoid the drain.

Posted by: Dad with kids from A-Z | July 25, 2008 9:38 AM | Report abuse

To A-Z,

If you want to check, just make sure the skimmers on the side are sucking in water. Lift up the covers, you might see the water swirling inside. Or you might have to pull out the strainer basket and feel the water around the little drain below that. Or hold the floating gate shut for a couple seconds and the water level should drop down.

This is really out of character for me to be dispensing this kind of helicopter parenting advice. haha I don't know what's happening.

Posted by: Common Sense Dad | July 25, 2008 9:51 AM | Report abuse

As for public swimming pools --- YUCK! Who wants to put their face in somebody else's heiny water? How clean do you think those other people in the pool are, especially an inner city public pool. I'd rather swim in a septic tank.

Posted by: TGIF | July 25, 2008 9:46 AM

Nasty! And I hate how some people just spit in the pool. Like I want to swim in their saliva.

Heiny water - never thought of that. Now I'm thoroughly disgusted.

Posted by: gross gross gross | July 25, 2008 9:58 AM | Report abuse

RIP Randy Pausch.

Posted by: To dotted | July 25, 2008 10:05 AM | Report abuse

Common Sense Dad-

Is there usually a way to shut off the suction? In the even that a kid is stuck to a drain?

What should I be looking for in a normal backyard pool to shut the system down and free whatever's stuck to it?

Posted by: Bob | July 25, 2008 10:13 AM | Report abuse

This blog is even worth trolling today!

Posted by: Anonymous | July 25, 2008 10:21 AM | Report abuse

I keep waiting for Mako to show up.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 25, 2008 10:23 AM | Report abuse

"That said, drownings are the second-leading cause of death in kids ages 1 to 14."

Interesting, but that has virtually nothing to do with the topic. Your danger accounts for essentialy 1 fatality every year.

Eating salsa is more dangerous.

You'd probably cause more deaths suggesting that people somehow dive to the bottom of the deep end of their neighbor's pool to "check out the suction on the drain".

Posted by: scared of everything? | July 25, 2008 10:23 AM | Report abuse

10:23- That was hilarious. I doubt anyone will beat that today.

Posted by: atb | July 25, 2008 10:31 AM | Report abuse

Posted by: Timely | July 25, 2008 10:40 AM | Report abuse

"What should I be looking for in a normal backyard pool to shut the system down"

Um, the switch?

Sheesh, no wunder hair dryer manufacturers have to put a warning label on them to prevent people from using them while they take a bath.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 25, 2008 11:04 AM | Report abuse

yep. I saw Randy's obit this morning. AB, did you see it? He went to Oakland Mills and graduated in 78.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 25, 2008 11:09 AM | Report abuse

"What should I be looking for in a normal backyard pool to shut the system down and free whatever's stuck to it?"

The power switch to the pump. I suppose it just depends on the setup of the houses and pool as to where the pump/filter room is located. At public pools it's usually behind a locked door in the pump room, for good reason as it's typically next to the highly caustic chlorine or iodine solution, muriatic acid, and sodium bicarbonate.

That brings up a good design point--it wouldn't be a bad idea to have an emergency suction shutoff switch easily accessible.

But honestly, you shouldn't need to worry about any of this.

Posted by: Common Sense Dad | July 25, 2008 11:10 AM | Report abuse

Um, the switch?

Sheesh, no wunder hair dryer manufacturers have to put a warning label on them to prevent people from using them while they take a bath.

Posted by: | July 25, 2008 11:04 AM

Thanks for the helpful advice! I'm glad to be graced by the presence of such an expert in backyard pools. Everyone here is truly lucky.

Unfortunately, you may have to be a little more specific for us non-experts. I don't want to speak for anybody else, but personally, I wouldn't know what such a switch would look like or where to look for it.

My guess is that you don't know either, and you merely wanted to have some fun trollin' them intarwebs. But hey, I guess that's just part of the game, no?

Posted by: Bob | July 25, 2008 11:12 AM | Report abuse

I know when the health dept reviews restaurants, there is an "acceptable" level of rodent droppings and the like. Is there a similar level for pools - in terms of "acceptable" levels of excrement and vmoit, and the like?

Posted by: Ojaime | July 25, 2008 11:16 AM | Report abuse

in terms of "acceptable" levels of excrement and vmoit, and the like?

No, there are just acceptable levels of chlorine to neutralize all of that. And as long as the chlorine is there, there's nothing to worry about, unless you're Howard Hughes.

Posted by: Common Sense Dad | July 25, 2008 11:22 AM | Report abuse

"yep. I saw Randy's obit this morning. AB, did you see it? He went to Oakland Mills and graduated in 78."

Yep, saw the obit. A real shame. I only met the guy once, but the "Last Lecture" video doesn't even begin to do him justice based on his record of accomplishment.

To go back on topic: he made an interesting parenting decision - after learning the status of his cancer, he moved his family from Pittsburgh, PA to Chesapeake, VA because that would be a better environment for his children after he was gone.

"I will tell you that I have experienced a deathbed conversion. I just bought a Macintosh." - Randy Pausch, "the Last Lecture"

Posted by: ArmyBrat | July 25, 2008 11:24 AM | Report abuse

That brings up a good design point--it wouldn't be a bad idea to have an emergency suction shutoff switch easily accessible.

But honestly, you shouldn't need to worry about any of this.

Posted by: Common Sense Dad | July 25, 2008 11:10 AM

Thanks for the advice. I realize that the probability that I'd ever have to use this information is roughly zero. On the other hand, this is hardly the first useless fact to enter my brain.

I'll file it somewhere next to where I store the operating instructions for a slide rule.

Posted by: Bob | July 25, 2008 11:28 AM | Report abuse

"I'll file it somewhere next to where I store the operating instructions for a slide rule."

Now you've done it. Army Brat will give you a 2 page set of instructions on the proper use of a slide rule.


Posted by: to Bob | July 25, 2008 11:40 AM | Report abuse

I understand the point many are making that this isn't very likely to happen to your children. However, if I had a pool in my yard, I'd do everything in my power to make sure it wouldn't harm a child. Don't do it and you open yourself to a lawsuit. I hate that we have to think of everything in terms of a lawsuit today, but there it is. It may be a pain or cost some money to make sure the pool won't hurt a child, but you'll never have to live with the guilt of a child hurt on your property and you won't have to see those parents in court.

Posted by: FloridaChick | July 25, 2008 11:45 AM | Report abuse

I know when the health dept reviews restaurants, there is an "acceptable" level of rodent droppings and the like. Is there a similar level for pools - in terms of "acceptable" levels of excrement and vmoit, and the like?

Posted by: Ojaime | July 25, 2008 11:16 AM

So I suppose you also eschew lakes (fish might be dirty or might have excreted in them), the ocean (dead fish, urine, excretion, waste), and breathing (someone might have passed gas).

Howard Hughes, indeed.

Posted by: OURanidjit | July 25, 2008 11:48 AM | Report abuse

So I suppose you also eschew lakes (fish might be dirty or might have excreted in them), the ocean (dead fish, urine, excretion, waste), and breathing (someone might have passed gas).

Howard Hughes, indeed.

Posted by: OURanidjit | July 25, 2008 11:48 AM

shut up. do you want to swim in water full of waste? how do you know enough chlorine's in the water?

Posted by: Anonymous | July 25, 2008 11:59 AM | Report abuse

fr TGIF:

>...So if you're going to a friend's house for a swim ....." -- obviously freeloaders at work here. What about your own pool?...As for public swimming pools --- YUCK! Who wants to put their face in somebody else's heiny water? How clean do you think those other people in the pool are, especially an inner city public pool. I'd rather swim in a septic tank.

Grow UP. Public pools are usually kept VERY clean.

Posted by: Alex | July 25, 2008 12:00 PM | Report abuse

shut up. do you want to swim in water full of waste? how do you know enough chlorine's in the water?

Posted by: | July 25, 2008 11:59 AM

He who is short on logic falls back on insults.

-- ancient Chinese Proverb

You swim in water with traces of waste whether you swim in pools, lakes or the ocean, in case those other references alluded you.

You do not know whether there is sufficient chlorine in any water. You should assume there is not. You do not know whether there is sufficient oxygen in the air either. Still, you breathe.

Posted by: OURanidjit | July 25, 2008 12:04 PM | Report abuse

"Army Brat will give you a 2 page set of instructions on the proper use of a slide rule. "

Slide rules are for wimps who can't do logarithms in their heads.

Posted by: ArmyBrat | July 25, 2008 12:07 PM | Report abuse

"I guess that's just part of the game, no?"

Yep! The trolls should come back soon after drinking their lunches, it's Friday on a nice summer day in DC, and I expect them to be plenty hungry. They deserve some bait.

Who knows, after this blog gets sucked down the registration drain, this topic could be their last supper.

Then I'll have to find another feeding ground.

BTW: what do you call a quadriplegic that slipped out of his wheelchair and fell into a swimming pool?

Posted by: The Switch | July 25, 2008 12:10 PM | Report abuse

BTW: what do you call a quadriplegic that slipped out of his wheelchair and fell into a swimming pool?

Posted by: The Switch | July 25, 2008 12:10 PM

yeah, yeah. We all remember the Bob joke, too. Right after the dead baby joke and before the knock, knock joke.

I didn't know you could repeat second grade for an infinite number of years.

Posted by: to the King of the Trolls | July 25, 2008 12:15 PM | Report abuse

I understand the point many are making that this isn't very likely to happen to your children.

JUST DON'T HAVE A POOL. PROBLEM SOLVED!

Posted by: Anonymous | July 25, 2008 12:18 PM | Report abuse

I'd much rather swim in a professionally maintained and checked public pool than a neighbour's pool where they may or may not have checked the chlorine, maintained the mechanics, etc.

One of the best ways to help kids stay safe in pools is for people with hair past their ears to tuck it into a swim cap - then it can't get sucked into a drain. Yes some can still entrap a child, but it's a start.

Posted by: Shandra | July 25, 2008 12:34 PM | Report abuse

One of the best ways to help kids stay safe in pools is for people with hair past their ears to tuck it into a swim cap - then it can't get sucked into a drain. Yes some can still entrap a child, but it's a start.

Posted by: Shandra | July 25, 2008 12:34 PM

Shandra, I hear you, but, with the exception of competitive swimmers, when do you ever see anyone wearing a swim cap? In two generations, they've gone completely away. I don't even see them in stores, except for stores for competitive swimmers. Do you use one or have your kids worn them?

Posted by: Golden Neighbor | July 25, 2008 12:38 PM | Report abuse

One of former Senator John Edwards' cases in his book "Four Trials" was about a child that had been disemboweled from sitting on a defective drain cover in a kiddie pool. That was years ago, and yet kids are still being disemboweled and drowning because of pool drain covers. What will it take?

Posted by: Amy | July 25, 2008 12:41 PM | Report abuse

"What will it take?"

An act of congress.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 25, 2008 12:51 PM | Report abuse

Do to global warming there is also the danger of amebas getting in the pool too if it is not properly maintained.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 25, 2008 12:56 PM | Report abuse

Do you mean the John Edwards with the mistress and Love Child?

Posted by: Anonymous | July 25, 2008 1:00 PM | Report abuse

DUE to global warming there is also the danger of AMOEBA getting in the pool too if it is not properly maintained.

Sarcasm works best if misspelled words do not distract one's audience.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 25, 2008 1:02 PM | Report abuse

Remember the guy who was electrocuted reaching into the toilet to retrieve his electric shaver? Then there's the toddler who choked to death on a marshmallow.

We're all going to turn our toes up someday. No getting out of life alive, and even the most mundane thing can kill you. Surf the Darwin Awards website---99.9% of the 'winners' are male.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 25, 2008 1:15 PM | Report abuse

My daughter has gotten "sucked" by the vacuum attachments (small holes) located randomly around our neighborhood pool twice this year. It's not fatal caused some decent bruising on my 8 yr. old and probably would be worse on a smaller child. Be aware if they are vacuuming the pool while you are in it. Normally its against their policy but it does happen.

Posted by: Paul | July 25, 2008 1:18 PM | Report abuse

"Remember the guy who was electrocuted reaching into the toilet to retrieve his electric shaver?"

Common sense isn't necessarily so common these days.

Posted by: Common sense | July 25, 2008 1:23 PM | Report abuse

re: Chlorine

You should see them testing the water every 30 - 60 minutes. Where they stick a test kit, grab a sample add drops and the sample waters turns pinky-purple. The darker the color, the more chlorine. Acceptable levels of chlorine are 3 - 5 parts per million (ppm) this results is a raspberry hue'd water. Anything less is insufficent, anything more is too much. There are times - direct sun, excessive heat, large population swimming, that the chlorine will be less effective. Occasionally pool operators (I also used to be one) will shock a pool overnight, that is to take it up to a very high level of chlorine and let the chlorine burn off, to kill any bugs. Anytime there is fecal matter found in a pool, the pool will be shut for minimum 24 hours to cleanse the water. Just for FYI - High levels of chlorine are not the causes of red eyes, bathing suit bleaching, dried out skin - that is commonly associated with it. That has more to do with other chemicals used to treat other issues with the pool - calcium treatments, muriatric acid, etc...

Posted by: catmd | July 25, 2008 1:31 PM | Report abuse

Sarcasm works best if misspelled words do not distract one's audience.

Google it @@swipe.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 25, 2008 1:34 PM | Report abuse

DUE to global warming there is also the danger of AMOEBA getting in the pool too if it is not properly maintained.

Sarcasm works best if misspelled words do not distract one's audience

Well, you must have known what they were getting at because you replied.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 25, 2008 1:37 PM | Report abuse

PURDUE UNIVERSITY

to the tune of "Home on the range")

Moo, moo, moo Purdue,
Where the cows roam the campus all day.
Where seldom is heard,
an Intelligent word.
And the athletes get very high pay.

moo, moo, moo Purdue,
It's a school any fool can get through
Where chimpanzees ,
can get bachelor's degrees.
And the Golden Girl straight from the zoo

Posted by: to AB | July 25, 2008 2:19 PM | Report abuse

One of former Senator John Edwards' cases in his book "Four Trials" was about a child that had been disemboweled from sitting on a defective drain cover in a kiddie pool. That was years ago, and yet kids are still being disemboweled and drowning because of pool drain covers. What will it take?

Posted by: Amy | July 25, 2008 12:41 PM


Do you mean the John Edwards with the mistress and Love Child?

Posted by: | July 25, 2008 1:00 PM


Clearly the family of the disemboweled child should be compelled to return all the money they got thanks to Edwards' lawyering, since they should have known that someday he'd be the subject of salacious tabloid rumors. (Yes, it's sarcasm)

Posted by: Anonymous | July 25, 2008 2:21 PM | Report abuse

I think this is an example of all access information skewing perspective. It's good to have all the real information, but I think it would be hard pressed to say anything's really changed from a few decades ago in terms of danger here.

I support pools making drains safer and certainly new pools can improve their design, but this does seem like a pretty low risk deal and if a parent is pretty paranoid about it, easily avoided.

Posted by: Liz D | July 25, 2008 2:44 PM | Report abuse

A 2-year-old in Maryland died in an above-ground plastic pool yesterday -- had no drain to hold him underwater. His babysitter left him alone in the pool. Pools don't kill chidren, stupid babysitters kill children.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 25, 2008 2:53 PM | Report abuse

I'd also caution parents about letting their kids squat or sit down over those fountainy-jet things that shoot up from the shallow end of commercial pools. Doesn't hurt the kid, exactly, but it works basically like an enema, with the same results. The parents always think it's cute until their swim diaper starts to overflow...You think this would be common sense, but my own observations over the course of 3 summers tells me otherwise.

Posted by: mom of swimmer | July 25, 2008 3:18 PM | Report abuse

there is also suction along the side of the pool, where the kreepy krawly pool cleaner fits in. there is a slight gap and if you put your hand near it, it can hold it. those drains are very dangerous. parents need to be aware. i live in arizona and we've had these incidents happen several times. one young girl was scalped by the force of the drain.

Posted by: janet | July 25, 2008 3:24 PM | Report abuse

Do you mean the John Edwards with the mistress and Love Child?

yes, that's the one. what does that comment have to do w/the disemboweling case?

Posted by: janet | July 25, 2008 3:26 PM | Report abuse

The parents always think it's cute until their swim diaper starts to overflow...You think this would be common sense, but my own observations over the course of 3 summers tells me otherwise.

Posted by: mom of swimmer | July 25, 2008 3:18 PM


gross. then the excrement gets in the pool for everyone to swim in. terrific.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 25, 2008 3:27 PM | Report abuse

It is a shame that Graeme Baker died. James Baker should have been the one to drown.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 25, 2008 4:10 PM | Report abuse

3;27, you have an unusually intense fascination with excrement and no experience with children. No excrement escapes the swim diaper. That's the whole point of the product and its design.

Posted by: gee whiz | July 25, 2008 4:39 PM | Report abuse

3;27, you have an unusually intense fascination with excrement and no experience with children. No excrement escapes the swim diaper. That's the whole point of the product and its design.

Posted by: gee whiz | July 25, 2008 4:39 PM

yeah thats why every afternoon there's a "baby ruth" in the pool.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 25, 2008 4:51 PM | Report abuse

Oh how horrific! As a mom, I can't imagine anything more horrible than watching a child die, and not being able to do anything to help them.

Posted by: Laura | July 25, 2008 5:13 PM | Report abuse

Thank you, Shandra - public pools have to follow strict sanitation schedules. I took my kids to my local public pool about a week, and personally saw an employee dipping a testing strip into the water to test the cholrine level.

Personally, I would never want a hot tub or pool (other than the wading pool that I dump out when my kids are finished playing) on my property, because of the liability issues.

Posted by: Laura | July 25, 2008 5:20 PM | Report abuse

I find this a bit, oh, I don't know, humorous(?)that this blog is still featured "above the fold" on the front page of the Washpo and it is after 9 pm. Trying to pump a little life in this?

Posted by: Advertise much? | July 25, 2008 9:11 PM | Report abuse

High levels of chlorine in pools are definitely a bad thing if you have asthma like I do. It's one of the top summer things I need to watch out for per my doctor - too much chlorine can even cause asthma-like symptoms in people who don't have asthma. (Google "reactive airway dysfunction syndrome" -- not fun).

You have to remember that chlorine is one of the most powerful oxidizing agents known to man. It is meant to kill stuff and it is good at killing stuff - unfortunately, this also includes the cells of your respiratory tract.

Posted by: Be careful with chlorine | July 25, 2008 9:30 PM | Report abuse

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