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    The Checkup:

2008 Baby Names

Goodbye, Jacob and Emily. See you later, Michael.

Your names are old news and falling out of favor. That's the word coming out of Web sites that track popular baby names. Of course, the official word from the Social Security Administration won't be out for awhile, but while we're waiting, several baby name tracking sites are telling us their views.

Babycenter.com lists Aiden, Jayden, Emma and Sophia as the top names from its readers. Babyname.com predicts the year's winners will be Aiden, Ethan, Ava and Isabella. If Arizona's any indication of the naming wave of the nation, then Isabella and Anthony take top honors. Parenting.com uses site searches to determine its list. At the top is a Wmffre (yes, I did spell that right). Wmffre, according to the site, is variation of Humphrey, German, peaceful and is pronounced UM-fre. Second in boy's names on parenting.com is Aiden -- seeing a theme yet? On the girls side, Ella and Grace top parenting.com's girls names.

What are your favorite baby names this year? Which ones have you heard that you think are just awful?

By Stacey Garfinkle |  December 23, 2008; 7:00 AM ET  | Category:  Babies
Previous: Family Life Circa 2008 | Next: Making the Most of Winter Break

Comments


The mind boggles that a name chosen by Britney Spears!!!! for one of her kids is a "top name". Water seeks its own level.

Posted by: jezebel3 | December 23, 2008 7:15 AM | Report abuse

Out with George. Barry is in.

Posted by: WhackyWeasel | December 23, 2008 7:23 AM | Report abuse

Out with George. Barry is in.

Posted by: WhackyWeasel | December 23, 2008 7:23 AM | Report abuse

B.O.

Posted by: jezebel3 | December 23, 2008 7:27 AM | Report abuse

B.S. - She's my favorite celebrity!

Posted by: WhackyWeasel | December 23, 2008 7:34 AM | Report abuse

B.S. - She's my favorite celebrity!

Posted by: WhackyWeasel | December 23, 2008 7:34 AM | Report abuse


No shocker there - water seeks its own level.

Posted by: jezebel3 | December 23, 2008 7:38 AM | Report abuse

We named our son an unusual name - it was my maternal Grandfather's name. But it is still a recognizable name. Who would yoke their innocent child with "Wmffre"? That just seems as cruel as naming your daughter "Ima Pigg."

Posted by: VaLGaL | December 23, 2008 8:44 AM | Report abuse

I once knew a girl named Claire Annette. Her parents were musicians.

Posted by: WhackyWeasel | December 23, 2008 8:47 AM | Report abuse

A friend of mine named her daughter Aiofe, (pronounced Eee-fah). A beautiful name when said, but I'm sorry for that girl as she grows trying to get her name spelled correctly on anything. She is pregnant with a boy and plans to name him Fenris.

I generally like traditional, old fashioned names, but have heard a few recently that I liked. Carys is very pretty. And there's a girl in my son's class called Annelise. We considered a family name, Catriona, for our daughter, but went with a different name in the end.

Posted by: WorkingMomX | December 23, 2008 8:48 AM | Report abuse

A while back, I read a post on a naming message board from a woman who wanted to name her daughter Amygdla, after the part of the brain responsible for emotion. Even worse, she wanted advice on how to make sure people would pronounce it A-mig-DAH-la, like the character in Star Wars. I think people were able to convince her out of that one.

Posted by: newsahm | December 23, 2008 8:49 AM | Report abuse

"A friend of mine named her daughter Aiofe, (pronounced Eee-fah). A beautiful name when said, but I'm sorry for that girl as she grows trying to get her name spelled correctly on anything. She is pregnant with a boy and plans to name him Fenris."

Sorry for the double post, but this must have shown up while I was typing...

I love Aiofe, but then, I have a weakness for weird celtic names. DH and I tend to use them as middle names, as they cause less confusion then. DD's middle name is Alys, and baby-to-be's middle will be either Aisling or Anya.

Posted by: newsahm | December 23, 2008 8:51 AM | Report abuse

We're due to have our first child in May - Hopefully should the baby cooperate, we'll know the gender next Monday. I'm thinking Genevieve Louise if it's a girl (my grandmother's name which I love and my mother in law's middle name), but I have no clue for boy's names yet.

Posted by: annwhite1 | December 23, 2008 8:55 AM | Report abuse

Adolph Hitler Campbell.

Posted by: jezebel3 | December 23, 2008 9:03 AM | Report abuse

I went to a baptismal reception where the couple named their son William Robert. Sounded like a nice enough name, but mommy got all wadded when the guests called him Billy Bob.

Posted by: WhackyWeasel | December 23, 2008 9:07 AM | Report abuse

Her name was Ima Hogg, not Ima Pigg. Tho I suppose that's splitting hairs...

Posted by: mlc2 | December 23, 2008 9:20 AM | Report abuse

When I was growing up in San Antonio, TX---there was a listing in the white pages for a Weldon Rumproast!

That's the all time classic right there.

Posted by: MeinDC2 | December 23, 2008 9:24 AM | Report abuse

At least 20 years ago, when I worked in the midwest at a women's prison, one repeat offender was admitted while pregnant. She'd told her older child that if the baby was a boy, he could name it, and if the baby was a girl, she would.

Poor kid turned out to be a boy, and the older child had the GALL to name him Sergio Mendez W (W being the first initial of the last name).

Posted by: Alex511 | December 23, 2008 9:39 AM | Report abuse

MeinDC, I think the all time classic is Dr Harry Beaver who is a practising obstitrician in Northern Virginia.

Posted by: WhackyWeasel | December 23, 2008 9:47 AM | Report abuse

Posted by: jezebel3 | December 23, 2008 9:50 AM | Report abuse

Oops, correction to my 9:47, he lists his name as Harry C Beaver, which makes it all the funnier.

Posted by: WhackyWeasel | December 23, 2008 9:51 AM | Report abuse

Pigg, Hogg, Butt, whatever...it's still mean to do that to your kid.

Oh, and Adolph Hitler Campbell has a sibling named "Arian Nation" and the baby is named for Himler...what winners these people are. Didn't they make it illegal to name a child in Germany Adolph Hitler? Or is that just a rumor?

Whacky, there is a Dr. Beaver at my OB/Gyn office. I can't recall his first name, but it's not Harry. I refuse to see him (or be seen by him!) because I doubt that I have enough self-control to keep a straight face and/or not say something smart alecky. It doesn't help that he looks about twelve years old.

Posted by: VaLGaL | December 23, 2008 10:02 AM | Report abuse

Bush is a funny name....

Posted by: jezebel3 | December 23, 2008 10:04 AM | Report abuse

I love our daughters' names. Sommer Grace and Harmony Raine. Simple enough to remember, but unique enough to not be another Aiden or Jayden (of which my church is full of). The only issue I get with Harmony is people want to call her Melody all the time. Oh, well.

Posted by: lindseycowen | December 23, 2008 10:49 AM | Report abuse

A friend of mine named one of her daughters "Brittany Dawn." A lovely name; everybody thought it was wonderful. But then when she was about 13 the girl learned that it described the circumstances of her conception. (Mom and Dad were on vacation in France; the sunrise was beautiful, and ...) Talk about grossed out! That girl's now 20 and still hates her name.

Posted by: ArmyBrat1 | December 23, 2008 10:57 AM | Report abuse

That girl's now 20 and still hates her name...

I wonder how Chelsea likes her name especially given her father's taste for women of her own age?

Posted by: anonthistime | December 23, 2008 11:20 AM | Report abuse

And of course, there is always Shanda Lear daughter of Bill Lear. You know, the guy that invented the 8 track tape and owner of the company that makes Lear jets.

Posted by: anonthistime | December 23, 2008 11:23 AM | Report abuse

I recently learned about a man whose middle name is Barnyard. Because his parents couldn't spell Bernard. Don't know about him, but it makes me laugh!

Posted by: JHBVA | December 23, 2008 12:18 PM | Report abuse

The weirdest names I've ever heard: Eleven (pronounced Ella-Vaughn), Male (pronounced Mah-lay) for a boy and Female (Fah-mah-lay) for a girl. Omunique for a girl and Genious for a boy. I suppose I don't need to point out the irony of misspelling "genius" when naming your child, but I did anyway.

The Maury show is a gold mine for these kinds of things.

Posted by: Monagatuna | December 23, 2008 1:12 PM | Report abuse

I suppose I don't need to point out the irony of misspelling "genius" when naming your child, but I did anyway.


Posted by: Monagatuna | December 23, 2008 1:12 PM | Report abuse

Think of the ironies of President-Elect B.O. .....

Posted by: jezebel3 | December 23, 2008 1:18 PM | Report abuse

WhackyWeasel, your talking about that OB named Harry Beaver reminded me of an orthodontist in Hagerstown with an appropriate name too. His last name is (and I am not making this up) Toothman. Funny how names match occupations sometimes....

And in the their-parents-must-not-like-them category, the strangest name I saw was when I was working security at a distribution warehouse in Hagerstown. Part of my job was to log in shipments, their drivers' names and license numbers, etc. This poor guy had the name of Mike Hunt (say it fast, and you'll understand why I felt sorry for him). I took one look at this guy's license, then immediately burst out laughing, but apologized for that. He understood, but I hope his classmates in school weren't too cruel to him. And once we knew someone who had named her daughter Lyric, after "Jason's Lyric." Certainly different!

We chose names for our daughters based partly on family, and partly on their meaning. The meanings of names are just as important as the names themselves, but are often overlooked. Our first daughter's name is Nichola Virginia(after my paternal grandfather Nicholas, who died the year after my husband and I got married and Virginia after my husband's maternal grandmother). Combined with our last name (which is also a boy's first name), her full name means "Brave and powerful maiden who is victor of the people." Our younger daughter's name is Amber Sophia-my husband got to pick the first name this time and couldn't find any on his side of the family we could agree on, but he liked the name Amber. One of my distant paternal ancestors is named Sophia, but I also chose it in honor of Sophia from "The Golden Girls," whose pearls of wisdom and snappy wit made her my favorite character. The name also means "wise," which was another point in favor. Combined with our last name again, her name means "One who is wise, brave, and powerful through knowledge gained by ancient wisdom." Those kind of destinies are a lot to live up to, but they are worthy. In this day and age, it certainly can't hurt a girl to have a strong name!

Posted by: dragondancer1814 | December 23, 2008 3:47 PM | Report abuse

WorkingMomX: does your friend know the origin of the name Fenris? If not, please tell her... it's the name of the wolf who destroys the world in Norse mythology.

Who names their kid after a destroyer of worlds? It's like calling your kid Hades, or Kali, or Voldemort.

Some people...

Posted by: pollyesther1 | December 23, 2008 4:04 PM | Report abuse

i know a woman whose name was pasty because her parents couldn't spell patsy. when she turned 18 she changed her name to patricia.

Posted by: quark2 | December 23, 2008 4:54 PM | Report abuse

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