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Posted at 1:37 PM ET, 02/ 7/2011

House GOPer: Leadership had to talk me into voting for repeal

By Greg Sargent

Check out this interesting video, flagged by Democrats, of young up-and-coming House GOP Rep. Sean Duffy of Wisconsin, telling a local TV station that he was so skeptical of his leadership's claim that they intend to "replace" health reform after repealing it that he almost didn't vote for the GOP's repeal bill:

Duffy said that the GOP leadership could only get him to vote for the bill repealing health reform by vowing that Repubicans would ultimately put forth their own proposal to replace it:

I don't believe that we should ... just do a straight-up repeal. My position during the campaign and today is, let's reform the reform or repeal and replace. And so, I wasn't gonna vote for it. But I went and spoke to the leadership, and I got a commitment that we were going to bring forward our ideas on this replacement bill.

This is interesting on a couple of levels. First, it suggests that some Republicans are aware of the pitfalls of voting just to repeal the bill without offering anything in the way of their own solutions to the health care crisis. Second, it suggests that rank-and-file Republicans are expecting their leadership -- which has promised to roll out an alternative but hasn't set a deadline for it -- to make good on their vow to do just that. And if and when they do, it's going to be interesting to see how the public views the GOP alternative and whether a straight-up comparison of GOP-versus-Dem ideas get people to reconsider their harsh verdict on the Affordable Care Act.

All in all, it's another reminder that even if there's no denying the health reform law's unpopularity, the politics of repeal are far from a slam dunk for Republicans, that they're potentially vulnerable on the issue, and that some of them are well aware of the need to tread carefully.

By Greg Sargent  | February 7, 2011; 1:37 PM ET
Categories:  Health reform, House GOPers  
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Comments

All, is anyone having trouble viewing or posting comments?

Posted by: Greg Sargent | February 7, 2011 1:44 PM | Report abuse

"GOP Rep. Sean Duffy of Wisconsin"

A little context on this guy:

He won Dave Obey's seat. His district voted for Obama by 56% to McCain's 43%.

Posted by: suekzoo1 | February 7, 2011 1:45 PM | Report abuse

Wasn't he the guy who was on The Real World?

And incidentally, if the Republicans are interested in repeal and replace, they should do it in one bill. Oh wait, they aren't interested in replace. (and probably not real interested in repeal to be honest)

And no problems with posting. I'm assuming I'm not having a problem with viewing comments.

Posted by: DDAWD | February 7, 2011 1:51 PM | Report abuse

Greg,

I am not experiencing any problems with the site today.

By the way; you might want to get in touch with Congressman Duffy, and ask him why his fellow Republican Congressman from Wisconsin, Paul Ryan, has not introduced the reforms which he told Barney Franks he had ready, back in the fall of 2009.

Tell Mr. Duffy to ask Paul Ryan; Where's your reform beef?

Posted by: Liam-still | February 7, 2011 1:51 PM | Report abuse

Repeal is unnecessary. PelosiCare has been ruled unconstitutional and void.

Upon appeal to the Supremes, Kagan will be forced to recuse herself.

So, even if Justice Kennedy sides with the liberal justices, a 4-4 deadlock means that the Supremes will defer to the decision made by the lower court, meaning the circuit court which handled it before them.

That will be the 11th Circuit, based in Atlanta and covering Florida, Georgia, and Alabama. The Chief Justice is Indiana-native, Alabama-schooled, Bush-appointed (Reagan-nominee) Judge Dubina.

*Game Over*

Posted by: KaddafiDelendaEst | February 7, 2011 1:52 PM | Report abuse

Senator Orrin Hatch: Kagan Must Recuse Herself From ObamaCare Case
http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5jrXa_PNXl0oAQipVuFCrJcLmLlYA?docId=277e924c63024af6af608a1919c35f98

Republican Sen. Orrin Hatch, an opponent of the recently enacted health care overhaul, says Justice Elena Kagan must not take part in the widely expected Supreme Court consideration of the new law... Hatch said he is certain that Kagan participated in discussions about the law and challenges to it while she served in the Justice Department as Obama's top Supreme Court lawyer. Hatch told Fox News that he believes Kagan "should recuse herself"...

*certain*

Posted by: KaddafiDelendaEst | February 7, 2011 1:54 PM | Report abuse

Duffy is on the list of the DCCC Drive 25 list, also.

Posted by: suekzoo1 | February 7, 2011 1:56 PM | Report abuse

Oh yeah- whatever happened to the "replace" component of the healhcare bill. I thought the house was going to pass a bill which involved selling insurance plans across state lines and Tort reform. I wonder if they know "across state lines" is a boondoggle and 30 states have tried tort reform and it doesn't work. Tort reform reduces the number of lawsuits but doesn't reduce costs or premiums.

http://voices.washingtonpost.com/ezra-klein/2010/02/selling_insurance_across_state.html

So where is the GOP replace bill? What does the CBO say about it?

Posted by: AdamantiumBeta | February 7, 2011 2:06 PM | Report abuse

Republicans only have great reform ideas, when they are not in power. 'Twas ever thus. Paul Ryan had great reform ideas, or so he claimed, back in 2009. Not so much now, that they are back in control of The House.

He probably never had any such reform bill, and was just telling The Big Lie.

Posted by: Liam-still | February 7, 2011 2:14 PM | Report abuse

"All, is anyone having trouble viewing or posting comments?"

Only when the first few pages are spam of what has been posted the last 5 or so days, sometimes more, from our resident village idiot.

Apart from that, nope.

Posted by: mikefromArlington | February 7, 2011 2:17 PM | Report abuse

No need for Kagan to recuse herself. Hatch was just posturing, hoping to start a boomlet. Since the RATS on the Supremes have made it clear that SCOTUS is just another political venue, a vehicle for their extremist judicial interventions (wasn't that a war cry for Republicans not so long ago?), BSKG might as well vote party line and hope to sway the other K.

Posted by: frodot | February 7, 2011 2:18 PM | Report abuse

Kaddafi is living in an alternate reality. But being a GOPrick one needs to create that alternate reality in order to have something to say.

Not once in his history of clogging a seat on the SCOTUS has Thomas ever reclused himself from a case representing and benefiting his corporate lobbying w**re of a wife. Why should Kagen? Because she's not a Republican right?

God your pathetic.

Posted by: dcp26851 | February 7, 2011 2:19 PM | Report abuse

I would have to say the game would be over for the Republicans if the HCB. They have no other concrete alternatives and the country would revert back to the status quo of being fleeced eternally by same health insurance companies that have the GOP in their pockets now. There are thousands of people out here now who are starting benefit from the new law and will be extremely angry if the GOP takes those benefits away from them.

Posted by: lddoyle2002 | February 7, 2011 2:20 PM | Report abuse

[AdamantiumBeta whined: "whatever happened to the "replace" component"]

Repeal... then replace.

Cart... then horse.

Since Senate Democrats have defied Federal rulings and refused to repeal the unconstitutional law, Republicans now have to push repeal through the courts.

One proposal being supported by Republican Congressman Paul Broun from Georgia (who is also a family physician) would let people buy insurance across state lines; let individuals and businesses create insurance associations to reduce costs; create high-risk pools to cover those with pre-existing conditions and make all health care costs 100 percent tax deductible.

“It will be a patient-centered system... Patients will own their own insurance policy so it solves the portability problem... It would give patients an option of finding low cost health insurance that they control.”

*patience*

Posted by: KaddafiDelendaEst | February 7, 2011 2:23 PM | Report abuse

I predict the individual mandate will be declared unconstitutional by a 5-4 margin.

Posted by: shrink2 | February 7, 2011 2:26 PM | Report abuse

[dcp26851 drooled: "GOPrick"]

Your Tourette's Syndrome outburst and inability to rebut the cited EVIDENCE merely demonstrate the intellectual bankruptcy of your position.

WaPo reported that, Kagan recused herself from 25 of the first 51 cases the court accepted so far this term. Much of the court's caseload comes from challenges to federal statutes or government policies, and Kagan served for 14 months as solicitor general, the government's chief legal representative in such cases.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/10/03/AR2010100303890.html?sid=ST2010100303908

Kagan reiterated what she said during her confirmation hearings: She intends to recuse herself in cases where she played a substantial role.

She was solicitor general when the law was drafted. If she doesn't recuse herself, then you may expect House Judiciary subpoenas to expose her role. If she wants to go that route, bring it on!

Thanks for playing.

Grade: F- (miserable failure)

/buh-bye

Posted by: KaddafiDelendaEst | February 7, 2011 2:29 PM | Report abuse

Thanks Bill!

>>>At the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, former President Bill Clinton said that Rep. Michele Bachmann’s assertion that the United States has the best health care system in the world is not true and that the new crop of Republicans in Congress are living “in a parallel universe divorced from reality with no facts.”
Clinton was responding to comments Bachmann made during her Tea Party response to President Obama’s State of the Union address.... Clinton continued, “You can get the best health care in the world in America if you are Bill Clinton, or David Gergen or Turki Faisal, but that’s not the same thing as having the best system that works for everybody.”

http://washingtonindependent.com/105401/bachmann-congressional-republicans-in-political-%E2%80%98parallel-universe%E2%80%99-says-bill-clinton

Posted by: angie12106 | February 7, 2011 2:32 PM | Report abuse

@Shrink: I think you're right. Or 5-3, if Kagan does, in fact, recuse herself. But then the question becomes: does the court scrap the entire law or just the individual mandate. The Va judge did the latter; the Fla judge did the former. Either way, the Dems have played this brilliantly. After a few years of having certain rights (pre-existing conditions, 26 year olds on parents' policy) it will be tough for the GOP to explain the removal of those rights. They'll find some way to LEGALLY institute an individual mandate....

Posted by: outsider6 | February 7, 2011 2:33 PM | Report abuse

Love it, Greg. Love it and live it. Leave no stone unturned in your quest to find a dissatisfied GOPer. You are a happy warrior for the Democrat Party, aren't you Greg? You are down for the struggle, aren't you Greg? Let us know when your Progressive Socialist Utopia is just about in place, and what your position will be in the new regime.

Posted by: chatard | February 7, 2011 2:34 PM | Report abuse

Love it, Greg. Love it and live it. Leave no stone unturned in your quest to find a dissatisfied GOPer. You are a happy warrior for the Democrat Party, aren't you Greg? You are down for the struggle, aren't you Greg? Let us know when your Progressive Socialist Utopia is just about in place, and what your position will be in the new regime.

Posted by: chatard | February 7, 2011 2:37 PM | Report abuse

If the Republicans had really wanted health care reform and if they had had any real idea about how to bring it about, why didn't they do so when the bill was first proposed? The answer is obvious. Yes, they claim they weren't really "consulted" or "listened to." But these shrinking violets have been aggressive and loud about repealing the bill that did pass. But their only interest in health care reform is scoring a point against Obama. They have no idea what to do or how to do it. So don't hold your breath waiting for their "replace" bill.

Posted by: 85edwardearthlinknet | February 7, 2011 2:49 PM | Report abuse

If the Republicans had really wanted health care reform and if they had had any real idea about how to bring it about, why didn't they do so when the bill was first proposed? The answer is obvious. Yes, they claim they weren't really "consulted" or "listened to." But these shrinking violets have been aggressive and loud about repealing the bill that did pass. But their only interest in health care reform is scoring a point against Obama. They have no idea what to do or how to do it. So don't hold your breath waiting for their "replace" bill.

Posted by: 85edwardearthlinknet | February 7, 2011 2:51 PM | Report abuse

If the Republicans had really wanted health care reform and if they had had any real idea about how to bring it about, why didn't they do so when the bill was first proposed? The answer is obvious. Yes, they claim they weren't really "consulted" or "listened to." But these shrinking violets have been aggressive and loud about repealing the bill that did pass. But their only interest in health care reform is scoring a point against Obama. They have no idea what to do or how to do it. So don't hold your breath waiting for their "replace" bill.

Posted by: 85edwardearthlinknet | February 7, 2011 2:51 PM | Report abuse

Since the republicans are merely puppets of the health insurance industry, the only 'replacement' they offer is repeal of regulations so insurance companies can rape you even more ways than they already do.

Posted by: fiona5 | February 7, 2011 2:57 PM | Report abuse

I think it's the typical Republican hypocrisy to see them criticize the health care reform bill while at the same time taking advantage of individual portions of it that suit them personally. Can't tell you how many Obama haters rushed out to put their college age kids back on their health plans while at the same time saying the plan will bankrupt the country. I'm also sure that many are happy that insurance companies can't refuse them because of pre-existing conditions. But, we don't want facts to get in the way or cloud our judgment, do we? The reality is that Republicans don't have any good ideas when it comes to health care reform. They just want to repeal Obama's plan in the hopes it will defeat him in 2012. It's about their politics, not about the people's welfare. Tort reform? Good idea but how the hell is it going to help my son and nephew who work and don't have health insurance, get health insurance? Come out with some concrete ideas Republicans, not sell me a bunch of goods that ain't worth the paper you don't have it written on.

Posted by: jfoster13 | February 7, 2011 2:58 PM | Report abuse

Edward -- isn't that a rather naive perspective? The Dems had super-majorities in BOTH houses in 2009. The GOP knew perfectly well that the STARTING point for negotiations with Dems would be a what we now call Obamacare with a "public option". The only idea the GOP would have had to contribute was not to do it! So they sat on the sidelines to let the liberal wing of the Dems torpedo their own party's chances of keeping power. And even with those super majorities, the Dems couldn't get the public option through their own caucus!

Posted by: outsider6 | February 7, 2011 2:58 PM | Report abuse

Posted by: KaddafiDelendaEst
*Game Over*
---------------------------------------
Be prepared to eat your so confident words.

Posted by: LifeBeforePrinciple | February 7, 2011 2:59 PM | Report abuse

@85edwardearthlinknet: You're a Stuttering Stanley.

*Stuttering Stanley*

Posted by: KaddafiDelendaEst | February 7, 2011 3:01 PM | Report abuse

"I predict the individual mandate will be declared unconstitutional by a 5-4 margin."

And we'll all be able to pay for the free-loaders from then on...

I thought Republicans didn't like free-loaders...

Posted by: juraski | February 7, 2011 3:03 PM | Report abuse

All righties ever do is bang their clubs on the ground and cry "socialism, socialism".

Posted by: LifeBeforePrinciple | February 7, 2011 3:03 PM | Report abuse

I welcome Republican input to any new health law. There was very little in the current law.

I also find posting here very slow.

Posted by: samsara15 | February 7, 2011 3:03 PM | Report abuse

"I predict the individual mandate will be declared unconstitutional by a 5-4 margin.

Posted by: shrink2"

That was seriously funny shrink. You are in good form today...as you were yesterday. Now that we've spent one day discussing the meaning and ramifications of "cognitive dissonance" you can perhaps provide the term for stating or predicting the obvious. :-)

Posted by: rukidding7 | February 7, 2011 3:10 PM | Report abuse

[Greg crowed: "[Duffy] was so skeptical of his leadership's claim"]

In other skeptical of his leadership news;

"Conservative Democrats switch to GOP across the Deep South"
http://tinyurl.com/4vujj7q

...Bell's defection is one of dozens by state and local Democratic officials in the Deep South in recent months that underscore Republicans' continued consolidation of power in the region — a process that started with presidential politics but increasingly affects government down to the level of dogcatcher.

"I think the midterms showed you really can't be a conservative and be a member of the Democratic Party," Bell said.

Since the midterm election, 24 state senators and representatives have made the switch in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and Texas.

In some cases, the ramifications have been profound: In Louisiana, defecting Democrats gave Republicans a majority in the state House for the first time since Reconstruction; in Alabama, they delivered the GOP a House supermajority. Republicans have 65 votes to the Democrats' 39, enough to pass constitutional amendments over Democratic opposition.

*Cowabunga!*

Posted by: KaddafiDelendaEst | February 7, 2011 3:11 PM | Report abuse

..ALL WE WANT IS WHAT THEY HAVE VOTED FOR THEMSELVES ;;INCL DENTAL/EYE ;;WE PAY 97-100% OF ALL THEIR MEDIAL COST/PREIUMS;;IF WE CANT HAVE WHAT THEY HAVE;;THEN LETS VOTE TO REPEAL THEIR INS;;!!FAIR IS FAIR;;WE THE PEOPLE !!

Posted by: bbccmm | February 7, 2011 3:14 PM | Report abuse

@Greg


re:posting/reading

Agree with samsara that it is incredibly slow, but no worse today than other days. Perhaps a bandwith problem...I'm not a techie maybe Kevin or Cao can describe the problem. BTW I'm not using trollblocker so that is not an issue. Would that I could though. :-)

Again to be a nag...any word from your techies on comment filters?

Posted by: rukidding7 | February 7, 2011 3:19 PM | Report abuse

This is a pitiful excuse by a congressman. He played party politics with his constituents' lives and financial security based on a mere promise. The Republicans are going to face the healthcare issues in this country right after they face the immigration issue. That will be never! Bush couldn't get them to tackle either one.

The Republicans' priorities since regaining the House: women's uteruses, Islamic McCarthyism and corporate deregulation. Same.Old.Party.

Posted by: Beeliever | February 7, 2011 5:09 PM | Report abuse

Republicans only have good ideas as long as they don't have to present then for review.

Because that is when the wheels fly off the bus.

Posted by: admiralj | February 7, 2011 9:30 PM | Report abuse

re:Kagan
Just ask yourself, "What would scalia do?"

Posted by: paulrandall | February 8, 2011 3:51 AM | Report abuse

But for many hardworking families, affordable insurance can be hard to find. The new "Wise Health Insurance" is giving you more control over your family’s health care by expanding your options for health insurance and making them more affordable.

Posted by: timoryan1 | February 8, 2011 4:55 AM | Report abuse

Seems to me Sean wants to have it both ways and is saying I was before it before i was against it. His comments have a Frank Luntz flavor.

Posted by: Pugsey05 | February 8, 2011 7:13 AM | Report abuse

Well, Gee, if Sen. Hatch thinks that Justice Kagan needs to recuse herself on any consideration of the ACA, then certainly he also thinks that Justice Thomas - whose wife has been making her living of late by lobbying against the ACA - also needs to recuse himself.
If Kennedy votes to uphold the law, that makes it 4-3 in favor of Obamacare.

Posted by: ched | February 8, 2011 9:42 AM | Report abuse

The vote for full repeal was just political posturing. If they really did it, people would be up in arms. The reform touches many people and helps many people.

Posted by: tinyjab40 | February 8, 2011 10:08 AM | Report abuse

Hmmm. Very interesting. I am one of Mr. Duffy's constituents in what used to be Dave Obey's district. Sean seems to have changed his tune since the campaign. Maybe he's had a few emails about repeal from what is, generally a liberal district - one that was served well by Obey. Maybe now just some of "Obamacare" which was awful during the campaign is now just a bit ok.

Posted by: Cheeto | February 8, 2011 11:34 AM | Report abuse

Good on him, but what would have been the harm had he not voted for the repeal? Seems to me he is having his cake and eating it too with this statement. Going forward, if he has integrity,he will monitor this situation because the Republican leadership does not seem focused on health care, as they were not focused on it during the Bush I or Bush II administrations. He owes it to his constituents to follow through.

Posted by: msu73 | February 8, 2011 12:15 PM | Report abuse

The saddest part is that he believed the republicans would actually come up with a "replacement" - just like many voters did - when the republicans clearly have no intention of doing so. How many times will he be personally fooled before he breaks from the party line? Will he actually show some principles and/or convictions, or is he just another sheep.

Posted by: notfooledbydistractions1 | February 8, 2011 12:36 PM | Report abuse


Like Rand Paul in the Senate, Sean Duffy is an independent voice for limited, effective government. Republicans should welcome the addition of new members who demand the best from party leadership.

Posted by: junomoneta88 | February 8, 2011 1:33 PM | Report abuse

re junomenta88's post: unfortunately, Mr. Duffy rode into office on the wave of misinformation about "job killing, socialist, death panel Obamacare". I hope he becomes moderate. Good for him if he becomes honest at this late date.

Posted by: Cheeto | February 8, 2011 2:10 PM | Report abuse

I'd be interested in seeing a real Republican replacement. Mostly because I doubt they'd do it.

And if they did it, it'd be interesting to see just how many lobbyists Boehner can fit into his office.

Posted by: Alex3 | February 8, 2011 3:48 PM | Report abuse

@ KaddafiDelendaEst:
First of all the PPACA was ruled unconstitutional by a judge from one of the most conservative districts in America and his comments were very much politically charged. So it now stands at 2 - constitutional, 2-unconstitutional.

But even more important is your point about Kagan having to recuse herself because she served under Obama. Then for the very same reason Scalia and Thomas need to recuse themselves because of their close ties to the Tea Party. Thomas' wife is a Tea Party organizer and Scalia has attended and spoken at several Tea Party meetings, getaways etc.

Posted by: JRM2 | February 8, 2011 4:18 PM | Report abuse

So what IS the GOP's plan for healthcare reform?

..............the sound of crickets.

Posted by: Mikeystyle | February 8, 2011 4:31 PM | Report abuse

I am having a small amount of trouble with this article in that the writer seems to be assuming facts not in evidence. While the Health Insurance Reform Bill is a far cry from the single payer plan that a majority of Americans wanted it is the first step made in forty years. It is in no way, Righties to the contrary, an unpopular effort.Rep Duffy better not hold his breath waiting for his cohorts to come up with any thing meaningful. All they seem to know how to do is just say no. It didn't do anything for teen pregnancy or drug use and it is not going to do anything to get us out of their mess.

Posted by: namora | February 8, 2011 6:01 PM | Report abuse

I am having a small amount of trouble with this article in that the writer seems to be assuming facts not in evidence. While the Health Insurance Reform Bill is a far cry from the single payer plan that a majority of Americans wanted it is the first step made in forty years. It is in no way, Righties to the contrary, an unpopular effort.Rep Duffy better not hold his breath waiting for his cohorts to come up with any thing meaningful. All they seem to know how to do is just say no. It didn't do anything for teen pregnancy or drug use and it is not going to do anything to get us out of their mess. And , if the activist judges manage to kill this bill we can assume that single payer is the only solution to just dieing.

Posted by: namora | February 8, 2011 6:09 PM | Report abuse

The health care reform act that already passed was made up completely of Republican ideas already.

Posted by: ElBruce1 | February 8, 2011 8:39 PM | Report abuse

I just can't wait for the GOP to post their superior ideas so that we can compare and contrast them with the Affordable Care Act. I'm sure it will be very revealing.

Posted by: T_ecoconsulting | February 8, 2011 10:52 PM | Report abuse

The insurance companies problem with obamacare isn't the mandate that forces ppl to buy HC,,,, it's the mandate that regulates how much of the premium paid by consumers can be counted as profit, which is in Obamacare---15%

That means 85% 0f premiums Insurance companies collect must go towards actual medical services to customers..

By using the mandate that forces ppl to buy HC,, they're using a smole and mirrors type rhetoric to end that particular regulation..

Don't be surprised if the game plan turns out to be a deal cut behind closed doors that removes that regulation on premiums and keeps the mandate to force Americans to buy HC..

A public option or single payer is the only alternative and that's why they haven't come up with as yet...

Posted by: DrJykell | February 9, 2011 6:49 AM | Report abuse

Does anyone else find it weird that conservatives are so gun-ho about repealing this bill, and instead of forcing every American to buy their own insurance they long for the days that anyone can walk into an ER, get treated for free, and hand the bill to us taxpayers.

My god what as happened to conservativism

Posted by: maurban | February 9, 2011 10:36 AM | Report abuse

KaddafiDelendaEst wrote:
"Repeal is unnecessary. PelosiCare has been ruled unconstitutional and void.
Upon appeal to the Supremes, Kagan will be forced to recuse herself.
So, even if Justice Kennedy sides with the liberal justices, a 4-4 deadlock means that the Supremes will defer to the decision made by the lower court, meaning the circuit court which handled it before them.
That will be the 11th Circuit, based in Atlanta and covering Florida, Georgia, and Alabama. The Chief Justice is Indiana-native, Alabama-schooled, Bush-appointed (Reagan-nominee) Judge Dubina.
*Game Over*
-------------------------------------

This guy gets the award for the most wishful thinking of the day. I guess you accomplish this type of analysis by working from your desired outcome backwards. Kinda like reversing time in your mind, or predicting why your team is going to win a game. I have no idea what the courts are going to rule, but I would just about bet my life that this guy's scenario won't play out.

Posted by: dparks2 | February 9, 2011 10:56 AM | Report abuse

Yeah, this is a real weird position for conservatives. Instead of having everybody buy insurance, they wish for a time when the taxpayers, government and people with insurance pick up the bill for deadbeats. That doesn't sound much like RR to me.

Posted by: dparks2 | February 9, 2011 11:03 AM | Report abuse

There is no way the PPACA gets repealed. There is no way it is found unconstitutional, in fact, it probably won't even make it to the USSC.

What will happen is a set of tweaks, one or two of the final ones being some GOP suggestions.

At that point the GOP will declare "Repeal" complete and move on.

In their best interests, they need to do it within a year or so.

Posted by: HumanSimpleton | February 9, 2011 12:50 PM | Report abuse

At least this young man sounds very intelligent and more thoughtful than any republicans in Congress for years. The GOP leadership are not trustworthy and have no clue what they would do about health care if they did repeal the reform. With more people getting information about benefits of the Affordable Care Act they do want them. Americans are tired of health insurance policies that are so expensive with few benefits. Right now insurance companies keep raising rates and blaming it on the health care reform but it is just them gouging away.

Posted by: equalon | February 9, 2011 3:38 PM | Report abuse

At least this young man sounds very intelligent and more thoughtful than any republicans in Congress for years. The GOP leadership are not trustworthy and have no clue what they would do about health care if they did repeal the reform. With more people getting information about benefits of the Affordable Care Act they do want them. Americans are tired of health insurance policies that are so expensive with few benefits. Right now insurance companies keep raising rates and blaming it on the health care reform but it is just them gouging away.

Posted by: equalon | February 9, 2011 3:38 PM | Report abuse

At least this young man sounds very intelligent and more thoughtful than any republicans in Congress for years. The GOP leadership are not trustworthy and have no clue what they would do about health care if they did repeal the reform. With more people getting information about benefits of the Affordable Care Act they do want them. Americans are tired of health insurance policies that are so expensive with few benefits. Right now insurance companies keep raising rates and blaming it on the health care reform but it is just them gouging away.

Posted by: equalon | February 9, 2011 3:38 PM | Report abuse

This freshmen is gullible and is softer than a sneaker full of slit. Then again, most republicans believe literally in the mythology that is Christianity so they are all gullible at that low level of consciousness. The republicans have no plan for American's health care crises. We don't need debate and repeal. This bill will do just fine. This is all about the republican's getting revenge because Obama beat them so badly on this issue that they are cringing and would do anything for revenge. They are selfish little pukes the republicans. Obama's Health Care Law is similar to what we have in Massachusetts, which republican Romney signed into law!. Now 99% of our citizens are insured and costs are going down. Health insurance is easy to obtain and anyone can get it. The state government under Patrick set up an insurance marketplace online where Blue Cross, Tufts, etc, compete for your business, thus driving the price down. Don't listen to the GOP. They are liars and don't know what they are talking about. Obama's law is a good law and will straighten out the system and reduce the deficit while insuring 40 million Americans and while guaranteeing that no one is turned away. A vote for the republicans on this is a vote for the republican's lame ego and hurt pride. Say no to the republican liars. Obama's plan is a blessing for everyone.

Posted by: vintel7 | February 10, 2011 4:38 PM | Report abuse

@KaddafiDelendaEst ...hey cut-and-paster....go research for yourself and stop posting false statements.

SCOTUS has final word on NCR.

Fact: 2 federal judges for, 2 againt.

Don't lie, KaddafiDelendaEst, by saying it is unconstitutional and therefore null and void.

HCR is not going to be overturned....deal with it.

Posted by: King3 | February 11, 2011 10:07 AM | Report abuse

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