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Morning briefing: Romanian PM ousts economic team

foodafghanistan.jpg


A wheat field in Afghanistan. Food prices around the world are at a two-year high prompting governments to take action.

(Photo Credit: Shah MaraiI/AFP/Getty Images)

1. Romanian Prime Minister Emil Boc ousted his finance and economy ministers in a government reshuffle aimed at appeasing public discontent as the country continues to work though an IMF-led bailout deal.

2. Retail sales volumes in the euro zone saw an unexpected rise in July. They were up 0.1 percent after a revised 0.2 percent gain in June.

3. Japanese monetary authorities appeared ready to take measures to curb a rapid surge in the yen following a gradual gain over the past months, according to news reports. Current levels of around 85 yen to the dollar are "abnormal," a senior trade ministry official said.

4. China ordered an increase in vegetable production to cool surging food prices.

By Ariana Eunjung Cha  |  September 3, 2010; 5:58 AM ET
Categories:  *Morning briefing  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Economic agenda: Friday, Sept. 3, 2010
Next: Q&A: Labor secretary sees progress, but long road ahead in helping unemployed

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