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Will states' foreclosure investigation be weakened after midterms?

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Could the tenor of the multi-state AG investigation into foreclosure problems change after the midterm elections?

Of the 13 state attorneys general leading the 50-state investigation into problems with foreclosures, 10 are up for reelection on Tuesday. "[S]ome of the leaders of the investigation, as well as the most aggressive advocates for consumers and against banks, could find themselves out of a job," David Dayen points out in the Washington Independent.

Several of them -- Jerry Brown in California, Richard Blumenthal in Connecticut, Terry Goddard in Arizona, Andrew Cuomo in New York and Bill McCollum in Florida -- are running for higher office and will not return to their posts. And other races are closely contested.
Currently, 32 of the 50 attorneys general across the nation are Democrats; 18 are Republicans. According to Governing Magazine, the GOP is poised to pick up anywhere from six to 13 of those seats after November, dramatically changing the makeup of the attorneys general across the country -- and potentially the nature of their investigation.

Ohio's Richard Cordray (D), for instance, was the first to sue a major lender for "robo-signing" when he took on Ally Financial in October. He's seeking a senate seat and finds himself in a hotly contested race with incumbent Sen. Mike DeWine (R).

Then there's the case of Tom Miller, the Iowa AG who heads the investigation. He faces a strong challenge by Brenna Findley, a Republican who is endorsed by Sarah Palin.

Another attorney general who has been very aggressive about investigations into foreclosures, Florida's Bill McCollum, has already lost his bid for governor and someone else will take over the AG job.

Dayen, writing this time on Firedoglake.com, a primarily left-leaning news and blog site, points out that these other AGs who have been involved in fighting the foreclosure fraud are coming back in the polls:

Cordray was down to Republican former Senator Mike DeWine according to independent polling in the beginning of October. But in the month since, the foreclosure fraud scandal has burst wide open, Cordray has taken a leadership role, and the latest polling from the Columbus Dispatch shows Cordray up 50-44. Much like Miller, on Election Day Cordray could end up as the last statewide Democrat standing (although Ted Strickland is closing strong in the governor's race).

By Ariana Eunjung Cha  | November 1, 2010; 1:05 PM ET
Categories:  2010 Elections, Housing  
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Comments

The following paragraph needs corrected. They are running for AG not Senate.

"Ohio's Richard Cordray (D), for instance, was the first to sue a major lender for "robo-signing" when he took on Ally Financial in October. He's seeking a senate seat and finds himself in a hotly contested race with incumbent Sen. Mike DeWine (R)."

Posted by: chucko2 | November 1, 2010 3:09 PM | Report abuse


If you are planning a mortgage refinance then you should search online for "123 Mortgage Refinance" before you decide they found 3.25% refinance with bad credit history and also did instant analysis of my mortgage.

Posted by: Anonymous | November 2, 2010 3:38 AM | Report abuse

Ariana.....you really have your Act together...great writing...!!

Posted by: jerri2222 | November 2, 2010 11:59 AM | Report abuse

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