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Posted at 11:25 AM ET, 01/18/2011

Dueling ads ahead of state visit: Is China a friend or foe?

By Ariana Eunjung Cha

chinad.jpgThe Chinese government and the Alliance for American Manufacturing -- a District-based lobbying group and thinktank -- have launched dueling ad campaigns that aim to shape public opinion on the eve of the state visit by Chinese President Hu Jintao.

The Chinese government's glitzy, 60-second commercials made their debut on six screens simultaneously at Times Square on Monday and aim to portray China as a friendly country. The ads highlight Chinese basketball supserstar Yao Ming and Chinese astronaut Yang Liwei as well as ordinary smiling Chinese citizens.

China's official People's Daily called the commercial "part of the public diplomacy campaign by the Chinese government ahead of Chinese President Hu Jintao's U.S. state visit," and noted that it would be shown at Times Square 15 times every hour from 6 a.m. to 2 a.m., totaling 20 hours and 300 times a day until Feb. 14 for a total of 8,400 showings. It will also air on CNN from Jan. 17 to Feb. 13.

huad.bmpThe AAM's campaign is running a print ad campaign that feature a picture of Hu shaking hands with President Obama with the words "Hu's on first. And he's about to steal home." The ads, which began running today in Capitol Hill publications such as The Hill, Roll Call, Politico and CQ Today, as well as online-only news sites, link job losses in the United States to China's "cheating" on currency and trade.

The AAM urged Obama to tell Hu that "the time has come for a more balanced economic relationship." "American manufacturing companies and their workers will be keenly watching and hoping for progress that will allow us to compete on a level playing field," AAM Executive Director Scott Paul said in a statement.

By Ariana Eunjung Cha  | January 18, 2011; 11:25 AM ET
Categories:  China, Manufacturing, White House  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Is China already the world's No. 1 economy?
Next: Chinese buying spree in U.S. likely to include billions in power plants, Boeing jets

Comments

Yep, Superpower in decline... you can see it by scapegoating economic problems on rising rival...

Posted by: Anonymous | January 18, 2011 8:02 PM | Report abuse

An America Lost in Squanderville.

The United States’ trade gap is the proverbial “leak-in the-dike” with its de-simulative effect on our recovery. In November 2003, Warren Buffett in his Fortune, Squanderville versus Thriftville article recommended that America adopt a balanced trade model. The fact that advice advocating balance and sustainability, from a sage the caliber of Warren Buffett, could be virtually ignored for over seven years is unfathomable. Media coverage that China has kept it currency undervalued is a gross understatement, it has actually been keeping the U.S. dollar over-valued; which adversely affects all U.S. trade with all U.S. trading partners, not just trade with China. Until action is taken on Buffett’s or a similar balanced trade model, by the powers that be, America will continue to squander time, treasure and talent in pursuit of an illusionary recovery.

Posted by: HJCampbell | January 18, 2011 9:10 PM | Report abuse

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