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The Future of Television Has Arrived

The news this morning that TiVo and Amazon have teamed to allow a direct download of Amazon Unbox movies to TiVo units - eliminating the computer as part of the transaction - marks a step toward the future of television.

The days of a signal coming in to the living room screen over a cable connection or a satellite feed may be numbered. Likewise, the battle over HD DVD and Blu-Ray - the new high-definition formats for high-definition DVD - could be moot in the future. If the Internet becomes the utility to deliver music, television and now movies in the home, why would we even need DVDs or CDs for entertainment?

It likely won't be long until Apple moves this way, as well. Apple TV is close behind - but still requires users to download movies and TV shows to the computer and then synchronize with the unit connected to the TV. That unit is already linked to the home's wireless network - how long until there's just a button on the remote with a menu of movies and TV shows that can be delivered with one click (of the remote, not the mouse)?

By Sam Diaz  |  July 10, 2007; 10:09 AM ET  | Category:  Sam Diaz
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Comments

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This is news? This has been available for months.

Posted by: TiVo User | July 10, 2007 11:10 AM

You couldn't use just the Tivo before, you had to use a computer hooked to Amazon to send it. Although, with ~ VHS+ quality, no DVD sound, no HD movies, and a price tag of around $5 for a rental, I don't know how they expect this to be a viable buisness.

Posted by: Cory | July 10, 2007 11:14 AM

This is old news. We watched Borat 2 months ago. Didn't have to use a computer either- Amazon uploaded it to my Tivo directly.

Posted by: Ken | July 10, 2007 11:20 AM

The future of television doesn't have realtime broadcast content like news and sport events? Suck to be in that kind of future...

Posted by: Anonymous | July 10, 2007 11:27 AM

Yes, because as everyone knows, the future holds no room for sporting events, nor news, so obviously there would be no need to broadcast either to a TV

Posted by: Anonymous | July 10, 2007 11:58 AM

I guess it is 'new' that you can now order them from the tivo as well, but I would rather just use my laptop to browse amazon from a computer. The rental model is ridiculous though:

$4.99 ($3.99 sometimes) for a movie.
The movie stays on your tivo for 30 days before it is deleted.
Once you push 'play' on the movie, you have 24 hours of unlimited viewing until it is deleted.

I got a $15 credit from amazon.com for linking my tivo to the unbox site, and that's probably all I'm going to use it for.

Posted by: Aaron | July 10, 2007 1:40 PM

It seems to me this story is just a way for a nincompoop to say he did work and deserves a paycheck.

Posted by: nooneofconcern | July 10, 2007 4:19 PM

Until they start adding closed-captioning to the Amazon downloads, we'll be sticking with old-school DVD rentals from Blockbuster, thanks. I have downloaded a few from Amazon via TiVo and the process was easy, but we need the closed-captioning.

Posted by: Kristen | July 10, 2007 8:05 PM

You obviously haven't done your homework. Most homes lack sufficient bandwidth to download even standard definition movies in a reasonable timespan. To download High Definition movies would require a major upgrade in existing internet connections and this will take several years. If you had looked at AVSForum you would have seen plenty of discussion of this topic.

Posted by: Ian | July 13, 2007 11:31 AM

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