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Spotlight: DJ AM

Celebrity deejay DJ AM, whose real name was Adam Michael Goldstein, was found dead earlier today in his SoHo apartment from an apparent drug overdose, according to the New York Post. He was 36.

He may have been best known for working the celebrity club scene, dating starlets including Nicole Richie and Mandy Moore, and his huge sneaker collection, owning about 1,000 pairs.

He also barely escaped death in a September 2008 plane crash in South Carolina. Four people died. DJ AM was critically injured, as was his pal, Travis Barker, the former Blink-182 drummer.

"I can't believe I made it," DJ AM told People magazine. "I've prayed every night for the past 10 years. There's a lot more to thank God for now. ... I was saved for a reason. Maybe I'm going to help someone else. I don't question it. All I know is I'm thankful to be here."

Reportedly he admitted to past addictions to crack cocaine. According to New York's WPIX, prescription drug bottles were found near his body in his apartment.

By Lauren Wiseman |  August 28, 2009; 9:02 PM ET  | Category:  Lauren Wiseman , Musicians
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"He also nearly escaped death in a September 2008 plane crash in South Carolina. Four people died. DJ AM was critically injured, as was his pal, Travis Barker, the former Blink-182 drummer."


Umm, this is sad, and my condolences to his family, but... wouldn't someone who "nearly escaped death", be dead? I think you meant "barely", maybe.

Posted by: lostinthemiddle | August 28, 2009 11:14 PM

Umm...no, he did not "nearly escape death" in 2008...perhaps he "narrowly" escaped it, or cheated it for a time, or something; he "nearly died."
But escape it he did. That time.

Posted by: 7hih92h | August 28, 2009 11:17 PM

Who?

Posted by: mdsinc | August 29, 2009 12:10 AM

Just like the death of JKF, 25 years from now Americans will recall where they were when they heard the news that DJ AM was tragically taken from us. AM has truly turned to PM for America, and especially for this incredibly talented...uh...guy who played records. Future celebrity rehab shows have truly lost a participant. Keep spinning those discs in heaven, my little dj AM...and please give Michael Jackson a hug.

Posted by: bayaryaan | August 29, 2009 1:35 AM

This is someone who all of young, hip crowd will miss. He truly made his mark on the world with a huge sneaker collection.

Us weekly et al. thank God for one more cover.

Posted by: Curmudgeon10 | August 29, 2009 3:20 AM

Bayaryaan, that was extremely funny.

Should I feel guilty for laughing?
Oh well.

Posted by: lostinthemiddle | August 29, 2009 8:57 AM

Now they have to find 1,000 men with huge feet.

Posted by: lostinthemiddle | August 29, 2009 9:24 AM

Thank you devoted Post Mortem readers for pointing out my typo, which I missed in my haste to get the most up to date celebrity death news on our blog.

Just in case you are interested, here are some links into the life of DJ AM:

http://www.people.com/people/article/0,,20301293,00.html
http://www.people.com/people/article/0,,20301283,00.html
http://www.usmagazine.com/

Posted by: LaurenWiseman | August 29, 2009 1:26 PM

I find it surprising that a man who became famous for playing music for celebrities (and only for celebrities - he didn't work at clubs where normal people go) is considered such a big star.

Posted by: Blurgle | August 29, 2009 2:33 PM

Oh, and Lauren: a really good way to stop the snarky remarks over tiny typoes is to blog using a man's name. If you use a woman's name the troglodytes will immediately come out of the shadows to screech and squeal over every tiny insignificant mistake. What's worse, if you call them on it they'll scream and screech that you're wrong (and you must be "bitter" and "lonely with your 43 cats").

Posted by: Blurgle | August 29, 2009 2:37 PM

did someone relate dj am to JFK, seriously. He is a great dj am, but JFK...really come on!

Posted by: jj45 | August 29, 2009 4:42 PM

jj45, are you really that dumb? Try looking up "sarcasm" in your nearest dictionary. . .

Posted by: 7900rmc | August 29, 2009 5:06 PM

Oh, and Lauren: a really good way to stop the snarky remarks over tiny typoes is to blog using a man's name. If you use a woman's name the troglodytes will immediately come out of the shadows to screech and squeal over every tiny insignificant mistake. What's worse, if you call them on it they'll scream and screech that you're wrong (and you must be "bitter" and "lonely with your 43 cats").

Posted by: Blurgle | August 29, 2009 2:37 PM
____________________________

Wow. Thanks for calling me a misogynist. I wrote my "snarky" comment without any idea about the gender of the person who wrote the obit. Had I known, it would have meant nothing to me.
Frankly, Blurgle, suggesting someone should pretend to be someone they are not, strikes me as far more egregious than my alleged "snark".
___________________

To Ms Wiseman, I apologize; it was not my intention to impugn your skills or ridicule your work.

Posted by: lostinthemiddle | August 29, 2009 7:09 PM

Umm, this is sad, and my condolences to his family, but... wouldn't someone who "nearly escaped death", be dead? I think you meant "barely", maybe.

Posted by: lostinthemiddle | August 28, 2009 11:14 PM

-------------------------------------------

Good catch, lostinthemiddle.

Posted by: waterfrontproperty | August 29, 2009 11:06 PM

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