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Fashion Designer Alexander McQueen Found Dead

Patricia Sullivan

Good morning.

We dress in wool and pile layers here in the Post newsroom, especially this week, but better attired readers may recognize the name of Alexander McQueen, a designer who was found dead today. Known for his dramatic statement pieces and impeccable tailoring, McQueen received recognition from Queen Elizabeth II in 2003, when she made him a Commander of the British Empire for his fashion leadership.

"McQueen influenced a whole generation of designers. His brilliant imagination knew no bounds as he conjured up collection after collection of extraordinary designs," said Alexandra Shulman, the editor of British Vogue. "At one level he was a master of the fantastic, creating astounding fashions shows that mixed design, technology and performance and on another he was a modern day genius whose gothic aesthetic was adopted by women the world over."

As they say on a certain TV network, we report, you decide: here are two of his creations, from his website:
mcqueen_butterflies.jpg

alexander-mcqueen-fashion-designer.jpg

In other obit news, we haven't had a compare-and-contrast in awhile and Good-Time Charlie Wilson is a good candidate. Tell us in the comments section below which obit you prefer: The Washington Post version, the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, or the Houston Chonicle. Let's not forget the UK's Guardian, either.

Fountain pens have lyrical names and Michael Fultz knew them all. Fultz, one of the globe's largest collections of Parker pens and whose expertise was sought by hobbyists from Belgium to Israel, died Jan. 27 in Janesville, Wis.

The earth is round but the universe is flat, cosmologist Andrew Lange discovered. Lange, who died Jan. 26, and his team in 2000 revealed that space is not curved and that light normally travels in straight lines, was hailed as a major advance in astronomy.

Alfred Gregory, who photographed the historic Hillary-Norgay summit of Mount Everest, died this week at age 96. Nice photo of him on this site, too.

Jacques Hétu, one of Canada's most prolific and widely performed composers, died Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2010, in his home in the Laurentian town of Saint-Hippolyte.

Finally, the inventor of the Frisbee, Fred Morrison, has died. Great tale of how he invented it, having to do with dented lids, cake pans and bomber pilot training.

By Patricia Sullivan  |  February 11, 2010; 10:58 AM ET
Categories:  Patricia Sullivan , The Daily Goodbye  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Former Rep. Charlie Wilson, 76, dies
Next: Frisbee inventor Fred Morrison dies at 90

Comments

You going to credit the AP there, Ms. Sullivan? Directly from the AP wire piece:

"Known for his dramatic statement pieces and impeccable tailoring, McQueen received recognition from Queen Elizabeth II in 2003, when she made him a Commander of the British Empire for his fashion leadership.

“McQueen influenced a whole generation of designers. His brilliant imagination knew no bounds as he conjured up collection after collection of extraordinary designs,” said Alexandra Shulman, the editor of British Vogue."

Posted by: hugesfan | February 11, 2010 12:18 PM | Report abuse

The butterfly head piece is fabulous but it is doubtful any of his work would be appropriate for a cow to wear in a barnyard.

Posted by: SoCali | February 11, 2010 12:26 PM | Report abuse

Hugesfan, that's why I linked to the AP piece. That's the credit.

Posted by: Patricia Sullivan | February 11, 2010 2:04 PM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
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