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The Daily Goodbye

Patricia Sullivan

Good morning.

Fred Aldrich, who died of a heart attack while driving, then crashed his car into a sandwich shop, was a survivor of one of Philadelphia's most notorious attempted mob hits in 1993. We'll let you read all about it; suffice it to say he earned his living as an underworld operative engaging in loan-sharking, gambling, extortion, drug dealing, and prostitution.

Can you imagine working at a company whose motto is "All We Sell is Fun"? Roger Schiltz, co-owner of All-American Recreation, which makes motor scooters, dartboards, spas and trampolines, was a good pool player and a better customizer of billiard tables.

Here's an obit for baseball fans: James Fargo Lanier, batboy for Ty Cobb. Lanier was 93 when he died and worked for Cobb in 1925 and 1926, living with the Cobb family in Detroit.

Alma Burford's working life reflected the rise and fall of the clothing industry in Australia, the Age tells us; "From youthful hopes and dreams, to postwar growth and success, to the inevitable hollowing out of a once-great industry, Alma's working life and the clothing industry in Australia moved together."

While we're down under, we might as well note the death of an Australian patriarch of polo, James Ashton, who died in a fall from his horse while playing the sport in Thailand.

By Patricia Sullivan  |  February 17, 2010; 8:40 AM ET
Categories:  Patricia Sullivan , The Daily Goodbye  
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Next: Polo Patriarchs Leave Legacy

Comments

"(S)uffice it to say he earned his living as an underworld operative engaging in loan-sharking, gambling, extortion, drug dealing, and prostitution". How about this: here was a guy who did two tours in Vietnam, then came back and engaged in the type of recklessness that his peers were doing while bullets were whizzing by his friends heads a decade earlier halfway around the world. Then, for the last 15 years of his life he lived quietly, making friends and building relationships, and hoping that people like you wouldn't sum up the whole of his life as a "suffice it to say."

Posted by: destro6177 | February 17, 2010 9:42 AM | Report abuse

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