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Gloria Stuart, actress in 'Titanic,' dies

Update: The full obituary for Gloria Stuart is available here. Please leave your comments on Ms. Stuart's career below.

Here are some clips of Ms. Stuart in Titanic:

Gloria Stuart, a glamorous blond actress in the 1930s who came back to Hollywood in her 80s to play the older Kate Winslet character in the blockbuster flick "Titanic," died yesterday in Los Angeles.

She was 100 this July 4th.

Ms. Stuart received an Academy Award nomination for the 1997 role and became oldest Oscar nominee in history.

Director James Cameron said he was looking for an actress whose heyday had been Hollywood's golden era, and Ms. Stuart fit the bill.

She later joked that at 87 she was one of few actresses her age who was "still viable, not alcoholic, rheumatic or falling down."

Ms. Stuart appeared in more than 40 films in the 1930s, including "The Invisible Man," "Gold Diggers of 1935," "The Prisoner of Shark Island," and "Poor Little Rich Girl."

But her best success came more than half a century later with Titanic.

In her 1999 memoir, "I Just Kept Hoping" (1999), Ms. Stuart said of her late blooming career, "When I graduated from Santa Monica High in 1927, I was voted the girl most likely to succeed. I didn't realize it would take so long."

By T. Rees Shapiro  | September 27, 2010; 12:17 PM ET
Categories:  T. Rees Shapiro  | Tags:  Academy Award, Gloria Stuart, James Cameron, Titanic  
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Comments

She was a talented and beautiful lady. I didn't know of her earlier work. But,I will never forget when she stepped onto the railing to toss the blue diamond...the reel broke and the lights came on in the movie house. The following week my daughter and I (with free passes) watched the entire 3 hour plus move again, just to see her toss the jewel into the ocean. We will miss her talent. But, our hearts will go on.

Posted by: juliesimmons2 | September 27, 2010 1:34 PM | Report abuse

I don't have tyme to reed this article because I am busy doing other much more important things, but all I can say is she must be the nations first child movie star since she was born in 1910, and the Titanic went down in 1912. Yep she was a 2 year child star and Titanic survivor. Quite an accomplishment.

Posted by: matrox | September 29, 2010 12:46 AM | Report abuse

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