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The Town Hall Debate: That One Comment

When John McCain pointed to Barack Obama and said "That one" during the debate - pointing to his opponent as one who had voted for an energy bill loaded with goodies for the oil companies - I emailed a friend and said, "Tell me he didn't say, 'That one'."

The exact quote: "You know who voted for it? You might never know. That one. You know who voted against it? Me."

McCain supporters have tried to explain what he meant, but there's a reason it was so stunning in the moment. I'm don't think it was racist, as some have argued. But it was objectifying. "That one" isn't the same as "that man." One is an object; the other is a person. A human being. 'That one' has a dehumanizing effect and one is right to recoil.

Giving McCain the benefit of the doubt, I suspect he was merely expressing contempt for Obama's position and the implicit hypocrisy. Even so, McCain would do well to recognize why people are upset about it. Given the heat of recent rhetoric aimed at painting Obama as The Other, the McCain campaign must work harder to find the high road he used to travel and from which he has strayed.

Meanwhile, Obama supporters have wasted no time in making lemonade from McCain's sour note. Andrew Sullivan offers a new slogan:

Footnote: The editors at BlackVoices.com polled its users to see how McCain’s “That One” comment went over. The results: 66 percent thought "it was childish and disrespectful," 20 percent was "outraged by it," 8 percent "totally missed it," and 6 percent said "good sound bite, nothing more."

By Kathleen Parker  | October 8, 2008; 11:48 AM ET
Categories:  Parker  | Tags:  Kathleen Parker  
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Comments

Much ado about nothing, and I'm supporting Obama. In a debate of 90 minutes, it is easy to have a slip of tongue, and I am surprised more of them don't happen. McCain and Obama don't respect each other very much, so perhaps the comment came from that, but, really, we should be focusing on the ideas expressed, not individual words or phrases.

Posted by: lde2c | October 8, 2008 12:14 PM | Report abuse

This One for That One.

Posted by: trace1 | October 8, 2008 12:16 PM | Report abuse

HEY YOU!!! YOU KID!!! NO, THAT ONE... GET OFF MY LAWN!!!

Posted by: ehperkins1971 | October 8, 2008 12:20 PM | Report abuse

If McCain had shown any friendliness during the debate , we could have given him the benefit of doubt that " that one" was meant as a fond reference to an indulgent junior (in age). He could have also saved some criticism by referring to himself as " this one" instead of "me"

Posted by: ajnairus | October 8, 2008 12:32 PM | Report abuse

"That one" is a total sign of disrespect from McCain. If Obama made the same comment all hell would break loose. McCain needs to apologize. These guys need to stop acting like a bunch of kids and conduct themselves like adults.

Posted by: ydf222 | October 8, 2008 12:34 PM | Report abuse

Yes, "that one" was disrespectful, but I'd much rather have someone call me "that one" than inply (incorrectly) I palled around with terrorists. McCain has done a lot of shameful things on this campaign, but this was not so bad.

Posted by: sarahabc | October 8, 2008 12:40 PM | Report abuse

Oh, and relatively speaking, being called "that one" by a guy who calls his own wife the c-word is probably a term of endearment.

Posted by: sarahabc | October 8, 2008 12:41 PM | Report abuse

No McCain/Painted Pig fan here, but "that one" is something many angry parents say when one of their kids act up. My mom used to say it all the time when one of us kids acted up with our shenanigans.

McCain is old enough to be Obama's father and that's what "that one" is about.

Posted by: tony_in_Durham_NC | October 8, 2008 12:41 PM | Report abuse

What a load, he might have well said "boy". you know he wanted to.

Posted by: obrier2 | October 8, 2008 12:43 PM | Report abuse

Hey, wait I've got a new complaint. 20% outraged? The writer says one is right to recoil. Recoil? As was pointed out, we're in the midst of the worst economic crisis since the 1920s and people are fake outraged over a meaningless statement during a debate. If you think there was any malice intended in McCain saying "that one" you need to work on your own self-esteem. Obama may win but that's not what would make me want to move to Canada. The USA is a country full of whiners with an exxagerated sense of their own importance going oover the edge at the most innocuous perceived slights, someone looking at them wrong, and overheard gossip. "That one" is simply not an issue.

Posted by: johburke | October 8, 2008 12:46 PM | Report abuse

McCain is nothing more that a joke now.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3i5T301aAWg

Posted by: sobugged1 | October 8, 2008 12:47 PM | Report abuse

Let's talk about the shameless things that "that one" has done against McCain. We'll start with the ad that makes fun of McCain for not being able to use a computer...even knowing full well that McCain cannot use the computer for prolonged amounts of time because of his injuries when he was a POW in Vietnam. Yes, let's talk about disrespect!

Posted by: AJD-PA | October 8, 2008 12:48 PM | Report abuse

I agree. While I do not think it was racist, it was an objectification, which just proves that McCain has written Obama and all of his supporters off as things to shove aside. It was utterly disrespectful.

This one is for That One!

VOTE!

Posted by: bell3 | October 8, 2008 12:49 PM | Report abuse

"'That one' has a dehumanizing effect and one is right to recoil. "

I hope you can see the irony of that sentence...
It certainly demonstrates how much of a non-issue this really is.

Posted by: jlbriggs | October 8, 2008 12:50 PM | Report abuse

Every reaction McCain displays towards Obama is disdainful so to dismiss this as a 'slip of the tongue' is naive. On the other hand I do agree with you that it's pretty much common knowledge at this point that McCain is a cranky old man who does cranky old man things. And so this is no surprise. Notice McCain couldn't wait to get away from those common folk and rushed off into his chariot while Obama stayed behind and schmoozed. McCain is really such a junk candidate that I it's hard to imagine who could still be supporting him at this point.

Posted by: unpluggedboodah | October 8, 2008 12:51 PM | Report abuse

Wow. Way to focus in one a pointless statement and pretend it's worthy of a blog or column post. This should have stayed as an email between you and your friend.

To summarize, I was so angered that this was the focus of this blog that I took time to register and post this comment. That means you elicited a pretty hefty amount of anger from this reader. And I'm not even voting for either ONE of THOSE candidates.

Posted by: drjones1982 | October 8, 2008 12:51 PM | Report abuse

"My friends", "my friends". Desperate John McCain sinks further. Not only his comment "that one" but also his body language displayed his disdain for Obama. The audience didn't miss it; neither did anyone miss the age factor. McCain looked sick and tired in close up shots, and the shuffling gait was a reminder of his age. It would be interesting to see what the McCain camp does now. Dig for dirt and ramp up the negative attacks ? That is about the only weapon left in his arsenal. It certainly works for the core -- already committed -- supporters, but that strategy has not resonated with others.

Posted by: probashi | October 8, 2008 12:52 PM | Report abuse

This post right here::

HEY YOU!!! YOU KID!!! NO, THAT ONE... GET OFF MY LAWN!!!

Posted by: ehperkins1971


HILARIOUS! And spot on! Go Obama.

Posted by: BrandyHemlock | October 8, 2008 12:52 PM | Report abuse

In 1980, while campaigning for Jerry Brown at Florida A&M, a student asked me in there were any "brothers" running for President. I replied that there "aren't any of them running." The student appropriately called me on my language. It was not intentionally racist on my part, but it did reveal how I saw people of color as "other" and needed more internal reflection.

Our early grassroots group for Obama had some racial stresses, most of which we worked through, but we (all Americans) still have some work to do.

Electing Obama is a great step in the right direction!

Posted by: samatva | October 8, 2008 12:55 PM | Report abuse

It was at best, RUDE.

What did Mr. McCain learn from the Keating Five?

He obviously did not learn that deregulation of the S&L industry was bad for the thousands of people who lost their savings and pensions. And over $130 billion in 1990.

He did not learn that deregulation of the financial industry would cost us at least $700 billion in 2008.

Why would we promote someone who learns nothing from the 'worst mistake of his life'.

Posted by: mtobias1 | October 8, 2008 12:55 PM | Report abuse

This is the most BS argument I have yet to see. This was not a slip of tongue nor was it a racist term. It is what it is, people use it all the time. Stop making it into an issue. And I doubt McCain would have made this into a major issue if Obama had said that to him. It is time for America to grow up!

I believe that McCain and Obama greatly respect one another, they simply just do not agree on a number of issues. Respect has nothing to do with agreement.

Posted by: unakab | October 8, 2008 12:55 PM | Report abuse

personally, I thought the comment didn't mean anything. I actually think Barack has an opportunity here to step up and denounce the faux furor over the statement by saying something to the effect of "The news media is spending important time talking about the phrase "that one" when they could be spending time talking about the issues that are important to the American People"

That would be somewhat presidential as well as show some independants that he can criticize the media even when they are "distracting" in his favor

Posted by: cgallaway2000 | October 8, 2008 12:56 PM | Report abuse

Count this one as another one for that one. OBAMANOS! Landslide America WE WILL BEING THE CHANGE WE NEED NOW!

Posted by: pedraza1 | October 8, 2008 12:56 PM | Report abuse

Give the guy a break!
The press should give latitude for these informal debates.
What do you have to gain by scaring people from speaking casually?
You're going to get people so uptight they all sound like
Obama robots.
McCain spoke more impromptu. To him Obama is a junior. I'm sure he would re-edit his statements if there were time.
Do you want people on TV or do you want statements from their law firm?

I remember being shocked during the Carter/Ford debate, when Carter did not refer to Ford as "President Ford."
I think he called him "Jerry. which was very disrespectful in those days.

Posted by: guavamatic | October 8, 2008 12:56 PM | Report abuse

BFD

Posted by: rtfanning | October 8, 2008 12:57 PM | Report abuse

Enough already. And for those still "undecided" get a life! If people cant see
the issues which divide these candidates, they never will. Whether or not you agree with Obama, at least its pleasant to hear someone who can talk intelligently. I realize that Americans are anti-intellectual
but after 8 years of that smirking moron Bush do we really want to listen to a doddering old man?

Posted by: jeff621 | October 8, 2008 12:57 PM | Report abuse

"Let's talk about the shameless things that "that one" has done against McCain. We'll start with the ad that makes fun of McCain for not being able to use a computer...even knowing full well that McCain cannot use the computer for prolonged amounts of time because of his injuries when he was a POW in Vietnam. Yes, let's talk about disrespect!"

Imagine how much America will be made fun of if we have a president that doesn't know how to use a computer.

That is like having a president that doesn't know how to tie his shoes.

Posted by: Independent4tw | October 8, 2008 12:57 PM | Report abuse

I find this "that one" controversy trivial compared to the following: the self-styled "experienced" McCain said he would "order the Treasury Department to enact a sweeping $300 billion program to shield homeowners from mortgage foreclosure." He doesn't seem to realize . . . or perhaps even care . . . that such an action would be unconstitutional. Only the Congress can authorize such expenditures!

Posted by: tedrey | October 8, 2008 12:58 PM | Report abuse

America says: "These ones for That One!"

Sorry McCain/Bush dead-enders; it's over.

Posted by: Englishmajor | October 8, 2008 12:59 PM | Report abuse

Oh my goodness... are you kidding me? Have we ran out of things to talk about already? that one, this one... who the heck really cares. Must be a really really very slow day in regards to news. But I hardly think so as there's chaos around, but what can we talk about today that the "people" can understand. Oh... I got it... "that one" or "this one".

Posted by: KAustin1 | October 8, 2008 12:59 PM | Report abuse

Considering McCain's age, his geographic region, the pressures of the campaign, the fighter pilot training, his pattern of harsh and irritated rejoinders, he's holding up pretty well through this campaign. But lately, from what several observer pundit types consider "desparation" his running mate and he have taken the campaign to a new level of ugly. Many of us feared McCain would use the debate forum to do that and perhaps Obama's return serve about Keating Five prevented it and perhaps the collegial format prevented it. Though McCain has been less harsh and aimlessly mindlessly negative than Palin, it's McCain's campaign and he exudes a kind of anger and aggression in his own grandfatherly or greatgrandfatherly way. I find him routinely off-putting and his treatment of Obama routinely resentful and whiny. People who have respected McCain but are supporting Obama are really sad to see this phase in McCain's career. It doesn't matter what color or gender, that manner of speaking is part of a patriarchal domineering war mongering temperament. That's what I don't like about it.

Posted by: GaiasChild | October 8, 2008 12:59 PM | Report abuse

Not a big deal. "That one" makes McCain "this one", in terms of semantic relationship. So it's just a colloquial jab, with some disrespect implied but no more than applied to himself.

Posted by: Neophoenix | October 8, 2008 12:59 PM | Report abuse

In the face of real, relevant policy differences between the candidates, focusing on a statement like 'that one' is ridiculous. Far too much breath has been wasted on the subject.

Posted by: bsimon1 | October 8, 2008 12:59 PM | Report abuse

Angry frustrated old man lashes out on global TV audience.

Fit for Command?

Last time we had a prez who took naps, Ollie North sold rockets to Iranians and funneled the money to El Salvador. Now we can't get the salvadorans to stop jumping the border and the iranians are threatening to nuke the oil fields we cant live without. Well done Ollie!

I'd prefer a wakeful president who can keep tabs on his staff.

Posted by: mikey999 | October 8, 2008 12:59 PM | Report abuse

It is not a big deal, no...but to refer to someone as "that one" as McCain did and based on his rude behavior in the last debate (not even looking at Obama)...and at the very end of this debate avoiding a handshake...

It is just that the contempt and obvious jealousy of Obama's youth and success....Well, it makes McCain look very very bad. Small-minded. Perpetually agitated.

Posted by: Sidda | October 8, 2008 1:00 PM | Report abuse

heck, ask joe biden, he's a coal cracker from the anthracite region of PA; he'll tell you it is common place and more often used for the simple purpose of singling somebody out. It's not that big of a deal, and certainly not derogatory, in fact throwing the thumb with it is usually pretty customary to; in general it is used in an affectionate way of ribbing someone when you tell a story. Being that the media tends to take a pile of dog scat on the sidewalk and make it into an international incident, because it came from a dog owned by a foreign ambassador . . . i would'nt be surprised if they made this into a mountain, even if it just a molehill.

Posted by: gettyleigh | October 8, 2008 1:01 PM | Report abuse

The entire article as well as the comment by McCain are useless. So will the result of this election, but find it out for yourselves. Pete Towshend said it best years ago (for EITHER candidate) 'meet the new boss, he's the same as the old boss'. My comment is useless as well.

Posted by: david10605 | October 8, 2008 1:01 PM | Report abuse

Maureen Dowd saw "That One" as a portmanteau of The One and That Woman. She also saw some race-baiting in the William Ayers attacks that Palin has been making that smell suspiciously like warmed-over Willie Horton.

http://dowdreport.blogspot.com/2008/10/two-willies.html

Posted by: yellojkt | October 8, 2008 1:02 PM | Report abuse

Oh, PLEEZE. What an inane column. What about the substance of John McCain's point about Obama's vote for the energy bill? That would take some journalistic effort to write about so just pick up on a single phrase instead. Sean Hannity is right: "Journalism is dead."

Posted by: rwe123 | October 8, 2008 1:02 PM | Report abuse

Did a previous poster really say the comment was "dehumanizing."

Amazing.

Now let's talk about Obama's support of abortion...

M

Posted by: MichaelATX | October 8, 2008 1:02 PM | Report abuse

"That One" reminds me of my grandmother's verbal tics. When she sees someone unusual looking or someone behaving strangely, she refers to them as "That One." McCain's use of it did strike me as old-fashioned, out-of-touch and most definitely cranky. It was also very disdainful... really awful. Sad to see a decent guy like McCain tumble this way. But he's following his "advisers."

Posted by: rdl114 | October 8, 2008 1:02 PM | Report abuse

"Let's talk about the shameless things that "that one" has done against McCain. We'll start with the ad that makes fun of McCain for not being able to use a computer...even knowing full well that McCain cannot use the computer for prolonged amounts of time because of his injuries when he was a POW in Vietnam. Yes, let's talk about disrespect!"

Well said!

Posted by: batwood1 | October 8, 2008 1:02 PM | Report abuse

That one shocked many ...
There s a saying "truth comes out of kids mouth"
but when you get old its your truth you cant hide your old brain has lost the control of filters between the brain and the mouth.
That s exactly what happened to MCain, yeah that one>>> the old man

Posted by: gsboy | October 8, 2008 1:03 PM | Report abuse

"That one"? You gotta be kidding. I bet when someone says "Good Morning" to you,your reaction is "What did he mean by that?"

Posted by: hank_v | October 8, 2008 1:03 PM | Report abuse

Ms Parker,
So you sat there waiting, loaded for bear, ready to pounce? This is a ridiculous article, my wife has referred to me as 'that one" "this one".
Why people have hair triggers on any hint of racism is because we still don't know, do we?
I myself am very concerned if Obama loses. Imagine that? I switched from Republican to Independent a few weeks ago. I am going to vote for Obama. I have read all Summer letters to the editor"moving closer to Obama"McCain better get on the stick or I will vote for Obama". That kind of stuff. I think when the curtain closes on the voting booth is the moment, not the run up.I say it's going to be a squeaker.

Posted by: gousa1 | October 8, 2008 1:03 PM | Report abuse

when i was growing up the term "that one" was a diminutive that parents or grandparents might use when making light of the behavior of one of the "young'ns" (young ones).

between adults it is, without question, a pejorative reference that suggests someone was acting with the same lack of maturity that might be expected from a child.

i am a woman. i get it that anyone who's not familiar with this in their own vernacular might think that it was intended to objectify, but i don't think so.

the use of that term was intentionally dismissive. it was intended to devalue Senator Obama's decision making skills.

language is important.

this choice of phrasing says more about Senator McCain that it does about Senator Obama...and what it says isn't good.

Posted by: austin9 | October 8, 2008 1:04 PM | Report abuse

Why does Obama deserve respect when it is something he cannot give. Think about all the names he has called american(legal)voters that do not support him or agree with him. "That One" is nice compared to names many of us have been called.

Posted by: rdancer42 | October 8, 2008 1:04 PM | Report abuse

Typical media making an issue out of nothing.

You want to write about a real issue? You want to be outraged about something important?

How about that both these men voted FOR a piece of legislation that will do nothing to remedy the current crisis in the financial sector. You know that bill laden with favorable treatment for wooden arrows and rum, that does zip to address the core issues.

The passage of said legislation has really helped restore confidence to the market (NOT!).

This voter will NOT forget how either of these idiots voted when she goes to the polls November 4. I hope no American voter forgets.

Posted by: NoneoftheAbove08 | October 8, 2008 1:05 PM | Report abuse

You have got to be kidding me! It wasn't racist, it wasn't disrespectful, disdainful, dehumanizing or shameless. Your article is insufferable.
I too was so angry that I registered to make this comment.

Posted by: middleclassmom1 | October 8, 2008 1:05 PM | Report abuse

Yeh, I heard it, but honestly it didn't affect me one bit.

I've made up my mind to vote for That One.

Posted by: ScoutieDog | October 8, 2008 1:05 PM | Report abuse

What has happened to John McCain. He knows better than anyone on both tickets what it's like to lose an election based on mischaracterizations, lies, and kitchen sink politics. And now he's employing those same techniques.

Was his "That One" remark racist maybe, maybe not. But, it is belittling? Yes. Disrespectful? Of Course. Condescending? You betcha. And all from a guy who should know better: John McCain. He even took a cheap shot at Sen. Joe Biden with the "Hairtransplant" comment that seemed to blow right past the "below-the-belt" media in the MSM.

Posted by: DirtyDish | October 8, 2008 1:06 PM | Report abuse

"Now let's talk about Obama's support of abortion...

M

Posted by: MichaelATX | October 8, 2008 1:02 PM "

We are pro life but it is Ok not to keep law & order in Iraq during our occupation & more than 654,000 lifes lost ( source Johns Hopkins) . That is pro life is not it ? So much hypocrisy about pro life.

Coming to the point 'Thant one' and not able to look into the eyes in first debate conveyed disrespect to the candidate.

Posted by: sasidhargv | October 8, 2008 1:06 PM | Report abuse

As an undecided voter, I am appalled at Mr. McCain for disrespecting and dehumanizing his fellow elected us senator Mr. Obama. I expected more from a us hero and tenured senator.
Also, I can see why folks are offended by the "gold-plated cadillac" remark. That was low. Possibly racially biased. Now Im def voting Obama

Posted by: supreme-analyst | October 8, 2008 1:06 PM | Report abuse

Yellojkt,

Obama supporters are using the race card when they try to deflect attention from Obama's close ties to an unrepentant SDS bomber by crying racism. Give me a break. I marched in civil rights demonstrations in the sixties but my support for John McCain today doesn't make me a racist. I don't want a leftist who happens to be biracial to be my president.

Posted by: rwe123 | October 8, 2008 1:06 PM | Report abuse

Senator Obama voted in favor of Bush/Cheney's energy bill. Change? No.
Perhaps family loyalty? Obama claims to be
Dick Cheney's distant cousin.

Posted by: mmarii | October 8, 2008 1:07 PM | Report abuse

While I feel that Senator McCain could have chosen I better term, I also believe that the author's statement, "One is an object; the other is a person. A human being." is not entirely true. Although stated as a fact, it is not. Not too long ago, the Army used the slogan "An Army of One". The One refered to was a person and the slogan was an attempt to individualize the Army. So, to state that One is an object is not true. It can be used to refer to a human being and trying to paint an other picture is deceptive. Again, Senator McCain could have chosen a different phrase, but really, I hope that is not the determining factor in anyone's vote.

Posted by: JustWalking | October 8, 2008 1:08 PM | Report abuse

"even knowing full well that McCain cannot use the computer for prolonged amounts of time because of his injuries when he was a POW in Vietnam."

Well that and the fact that he's ancient...and has limited intelligence.

Posted by: unpluggedboodah | October 8, 2008 1:08 PM | Report abuse

One could argue about whether or not the word 'one' could be used to speak about a person, but when one does that, said person is ignoring both etymology and proper grammar.

Latin and other languages have the concept of "third-person impersonal", which one would use when speaking about "some non-specific person in general". English has this construct, and one would use it by saying "one". However, this construct is generally considered highly formal, so one would rarely use it in colloquial speech. Technically speaking, though, it is grammatically preferred to use "one" over "he or she" because of its conciseness and lack of gender preference (through ordering). Of course, one should always prefer this over the common error of combining he or she with the plural pronoun: "He or she should never swim after they just ate."

That said, one would be accurate in saying that this is not how McCain used the word. However, I merely wanted to point out that Ms. Parker's statement that "One is an object; the other is a person" is not always true. One could, and more often should, use the word one when describing a non-specific person.

Posted by: matteo522 | October 8, 2008 1:08 PM | Report abuse

Great! My vote goes to THAT ONE!

Posted by: michelenebowyer | October 8, 2008 1:08 PM | Report abuse

Two things about this exchange seem glaringly obvious:

1. McCain had intended to say something to the effect of, "You know which one of us voted for it? That one."

2. Irrelevant slips of the tongue are eternally going to be needlessly scrutinized by partisans of either side who are more concerned with naysaying than with substance and the country's future.

Posted by: almostapathetic | October 8, 2008 1:09 PM | Report abuse

This is petty, petty, petty! Not only are these debates a fraud (see the website opendebates), THOSE TWO just sold out our country to help bail out their Wall Street Buddies. This is unimporant, distraction...trivia. You all need to Grow up and learn to pay attention to the things that really matter. Try going to sites like opensecrets or the center for responsive politics. Go to youtube and look up what Ralph Nader and see his statement on the passage of the final bail out bill. Also see Ron Paul, Marcy Kaptur, Dennis Kucinich...but don't be idiots sidetracked by media distractions and culture wars. theres a pox on both your houses and we have all been betrayed!

Posted by: jennycat | October 8, 2008 1:09 PM | Report abuse

It shows the real immaturity of the common voter to try and make up a bogus issue, when there are so many REAL, IMPORTANT, POLICY issues that are at stake to redirect the course of this country.

This is not about racism. Or ageism.
Or being a "meany."
GIVE ME A BREAK!!!!

This was about a candidate showing disdain at the record of his opponent.
Regardless of where you stand on the issues; there are too many important ones to waste your time on this!

Posted by: viceroyvic | October 8, 2008 1:10 PM | Report abuse

During the debate McCain called President Reagan his "hero". However, there are enormous differences in the way Reagan vs. McCain act towards his opposition or potential foes. Even when referring to his arch Soviet rival, Gorby, he respectfully called him "Mr Gorbachev" to "tear down this wall." Reagan who was older than McCain during his second term also seemed less old and cranky than McCain.

Posted by: jojohong | October 8, 2008 1:11 PM | Report abuse

"You have got to be kidding me! It wasn't racist, it wasn't disrespectful, disdainful, dehumanizing or shameless. Your article is insufferable.
I too was so angry that I registered to make this comment."

It was wasted time. Pretty much everyone agrees the phrase was, at the very BEST, tasteless. Although I've heard 'that one' is a term that really old people use. Are you really really old?

Posted by: unpluggedboodah | October 8, 2008 1:12 PM | Report abuse

McCain has contempt for Obama, because like Hillary, he thinks something is being taken from him.
The lower 1 percent of a class has no business flying a jet in Vietnam.

Posted by: AtomAnt | October 8, 2008 1:14 PM | Report abuse

When this occurred last night, I believe McCain was trying to make one more point. He said I know you're tired of hearing things like this (like who voted for what) but, well, I just to have to add this last one. I sense McCain's frustration of having this young whippersnapper come in and sweep up the momentum. But McCain had to try to say one more time I'm the one who votes against the establishment, darn it. Not him! Like Hillary Clinton before him, McCain cannot really believe he is behind this relatively young fellow with little political experience when compared to the decades McCain has. You could just feel McCain begging for the audience to see it in this perspective. It was kind of sad and over the top ("Christmas tree of goodies" with the hand movements). McCain's whole statement there is the epitome of the desparation he feels as the presidency is quickly slipping away from him.

Posted by: baltimoremom | October 8, 2008 1:15 PM | Report abuse

Sorry, but again, it show that McCain can have a quick temper. I don't think we want a president of this country going over to meet with foreign leaders saying 'that one'.

McCain seems to rattle very easily (another trait we don't want in a president).

Our image throughout the world is damaged enough, now. We don't need to complicate things even further by having to correct this type of behavior (yet again) by another president.

Posted by: ssanford00 | October 8, 2008 1:16 PM | Report abuse

From my observations over the past few months, I would say McCain had simply forgotten Obama's name.

Posted by: wretched_hyena | October 8, 2008 1:17 PM | Report abuse

Probably much ado about nothing re That One remark by McCain. BUT interestingly I had the gut reaction that McCain forgot Obama's name in the heat of the moment or perhaps a "senior moment".....

Posted by: pwlygal | October 8, 2008 1:18 PM | Report abuse

Why is it when the Democrats use a cliche (lipstick on a pig)the Republicans cry, stomp and claim it's sexist, but when they make a comment such as "that one" it's trivial and shouldn't be taken the wrong way? Bottom line, in making this comment McCain was disrespectful and disconnected and THAT is a reflection of how he would govern.

Posted by: ld1767 | October 8, 2008 1:20 PM | Report abuse

In all of us - beyond age, experience, education, aspirations and accomplishments - lies an immutable and lasting stratum of what can best be called "character." It consists of a mixture of pragmatic ideals, including abiding self-confidence and self-respect, a compassionate spirituality, honesty, and a healthy and consistent work ethic, moral strength and a respect for others. These qualities are not so readily apparent - emerging more in what a person does over time, and not so much in what they say. I have observed John McCain and Barack Obama long enough to have seen a striking difference between them in terms of some of the qualities mentioned. I hope you will observe them and compare them, too, and vote on the basis of what you find. It may prove critical to America's survival as the leader of the free world.

Posted by: dajerryguy | October 8, 2008 1:20 PM | Report abuse

This is a sure sign that getting old does not automatically qualifies a person as a mature and thoughtful being. Most people just get old and bitter and lucky few of us become mature and enlightened in character as personified in that ever present fictional Wise Old Man. John McCain ain't one of those lucky ones.

Posted by: thisworld | October 8, 2008 1:22 PM | Report abuse

Shame on McCain, shame on Sarah Palin, shame on the Republican Party campaign. The dirty, personal attacks that the Republican's have been slamming at Obama, in videos and in Palin's speeches, have been proven to be ineffective. In fact, most are offended that McCain and his surrogates would stoop to that level of indecency. The republican campaign, in the past three weeks, has redefined desperation.

I used to respect John McCain. He used to represent his generation (my generation) with honesty and valor.

The contrast of McCain and Obama both in principle and stature, at the 'Town Hall Meeting,' magnified and reenforced just how out of touch with the future generation McCain is. Face it, John, it's time to pass the baton. Do it with dignity!

Posted by: jlo2 | October 8, 2008 1:22 PM | Report abuse

If Obama had made the same comment about McCaint - the web would have been crippled by the hateful responses. Obama '08

Posted by: glauver | October 8, 2008 1:23 PM | Report abuse

Oh, please.

Isn't this getting a bit desperate?

I am not voting for either one. I'm writing in. And like everyone else my mind is made up.

But what about the condescending tone of Obama towards Brokaw? And his repeatedly blowing off the format as if it didn't really apply to someone as inherently special as he was.

If Obama is the answer to all our prayers, then why is Reuters giving him merely a two point lead over McCain?

McCain is a doddering, taxidermied relic of the status quo. Bringing in the New Year's Baby to fix things and then telling us all Obama is the answer to our prayers just because he is glibly rhetorical shows us how pathetic this is getting.

We deserve better that what both parties have foisted onto the ticket.

We are screwed either way.
It will just take some of you longer to figure that than others.

And Obama has made very little inroad in small towns. That's precisely why Palin was put onto the ticket.
And you know what, just by being there, she is achieving that goal way more than the media even has a clue about. Go into any small town diner and chat up the waitress. She'll tell you way more than any got your head up your city limits poll.

What is actually out here in the Flyover is a world away from what you are reading on the WP. You sell papers by telling people what they want to hear.
You run elections by demonizing one candidate over the other. No matter how reciprocally bad they both equally are for the country.

It's not that McCain is going to win this, courtesy of the deliberately overlooked, it's simply a matter of by how much.

The people who are going to sway this election don't watch debates. They sit in congregations and value conformity above all.
did you think the people who gave George Bush a second chance melted away, or what?
They're still there and they are not going to go anywhere near Obama.

Not just because they don't trust him and have no reason to, but because his supporters have turned everyone off to the extent they have.

For example, if McCain wanted to win in a landslide, all he'd have to do is put a DVD of Chris Rock Kill the Messenger in every mailbox. Or run it on the networks right after the last debate.

I've always really adored Chris Rock.
But I was appalled and dismayed that he could openly proclaim himself to be such a racist and think he was doing anyone any sort of favor.

It made me realize that the racist contingent in this election belongs solidly to Obama.
And it's going to cost him voters.

Rock has made millions from 90 minutes of extraordinarily unalloyed in your face vicious bigotry. No one reined one second of that in.

And you want to do in McCain over two innocuously ambiguous at best words?

Get real.

-gala1

Posted by: gala1 | October 8, 2008 1:23 PM | Report abuse

He called his current wife c**t in public. He called Obama who is very likely to become the next president of America 'that one'. Using this as a hint, I can only imagine what he must really call his sidekick attack dog, Palin, in the comfort of his own privacy when she isn't litsening. Perhaps, that b**ch?

Posted by: thisworld | October 8, 2008 1:26 PM | Report abuse

This is a non-issue. I couldn't be a more fervent Obama supporter, but this story isn't worth the pixels it's printed with.

McCain probably meant to say "...which SENATOR voted for it? That one." It would be totally innocuous in that context.

Posted by: kdmerkle | October 8, 2008 1:26 PM | Report abuse

Shame on McCain, shame on Sarah Palin, shame on the Republican Party campaign. The dirty, personal attacks that the Republican's have been slamming at Obama, in videos and in Palin's speeches, have been proven to be ineffective. In fact, most are offended that McCain and his surrogates would stoop to that level of indecency. The republican campaign, in the past three weeks, has redefined desperation.

I used to respect John McCain. He used to represent his generation (my generation) with honesty and valor.

The contrast of McCain and Obama both in principle and stature, at the 'Town Hall Meeting,' magnified and reenforced just how out of touch with the future generation McCain is. Face it, John, it's time to pass the baton. Do it with dignity!

Posted by: jlo2 | October 8, 2008 1:28 PM | Report abuse

Not that it matters but there were actually three things that occurred during the second debate that were telling signs of McCain's age and inability to keep his sentiment for African Americans under wrap. If you noticed every single person that addressed McCain as the first responder, he got up off his seat and moved to the person and spoke directly to them. The mediator called McCain to attention, he got up and the young African American lady stood up and posed a question about global warming, before she could even finish, he turned his back, walked away and began addressing others. He never looked back at her once. Secondly, He suggested that "Oliver Clark" the youg African American man who posed the question about Fannie Mae probably wasn't familiar with Fannie Mae before the bail out and finally - "That One!" Who, what person would feel good about being referred to as "That One?" There is also an ad campaign that shows a cloud coming over the land and that in history has been a reference in neighborhoods as code language about the influx of blacks people moving into the neighborhood 20-30 years ago. The racism is so clear but it doesn't matter anymore because I knew that it couldn't remain the same forever. I am just pleased to be alive to see it become something different - hopefully better. All men are created equal and deserving of respect.

Posted by: davithor1 | October 8, 2008 1:29 PM | Report abuse

It was dehumanizing and racist. McCain showed his contempt for his senate rival as being beneath him and not a peer. But it is all good! McCain will be the 1st white man in 230 yrs to lose a presidential race to a man of color, yes, 'That one.' Hope he can live with it.

Posted by: tydicea | October 8, 2008 1:30 PM | Report abuse

For all of you critizing this topic.....get over it. There are people who have made up their mind months ago, on who they are voting for, and this is purely entertainment for us......and the fact that you comment here only fuels the topic more.....duh. GTFO!

Posted by: smellysnatch | October 8, 2008 1:31 PM | Report abuse

Words matter.

A candidate for the highest office in the land should be judged by the highest standards in the land, "elite"" standards if you will, "elite" in the original connotation of the word, the highest, the best, not as a class warfare charged word.

"That One" was a cheap shot, intended to be derogatory, not a statement worthy of a President of the United States.

Posted by: leanderthal | October 8, 2008 1:32 PM | Report abuse

Sean Hannity is right: "Journalism is dead."

Posted by: rwe123
*********************
He would know - he's been p*ssing on the grave for years. THAT is your source of reality? puleassse...

If McCain was gentleman and the elder statesman he pretends to me, not only would he have the decency not only look the man in the eye and call him by his title and name, he would have hung around and given the people who came out some of his time. Are the supporters of McCain such a bunch of ill-mannered pigs that they think this is cute or remotely effective?

Posted by: LABC | October 8, 2008 1:37 PM | Report abuse

Muleman supports Obama and finds that this comment isn't worth the ink/keystrokes being used to discuss it. If anything, it demonstrates that Sen. McCain's temper can get the better of him.
As per many of the other posters here, time to move on to the critical issues and stop the childishness.

Posted by: muleman | October 8, 2008 1:39 PM | Report abuse

To the readers: your responses to Ms. Parkers column are generally well written and thoughtful. What troubles me is that her topic is a discussion point.

Should we not be more concerned that smear tactics and bickering are the things that win elections? I am alarmed that our candidates must simplify important issues to the degree that they have. Both men are intelligent. But it is difficult for them to speak specifically about their positions because the average American is either too lazy or too uneducated to grasp the complexities of current events.

Why can't all of you people focus this instead of debating word choice?

Posted by: johan2 | October 8, 2008 1:40 PM | Report abuse

"If Obama is the answer to all our prayers, then why is Reuters giving him merely a two point lead over McCain?"

If McCain is the answer to a single prayer, why has he been outside the margin of error in the Gallup poll for twelve straight days?

Posted by: WillyHSmith | October 8, 2008 1:41 PM | Report abuse

The comment did catch my attention, but I think it was intended as a substitute for "candidate," as in: "You know [which of the two candidates before you] voted for it? That one." It's obvious that McCain was avoiding saying Obama's name, which is certainly dismissive in its own right, but I think the outrage and perceived racism over this inelegant usage is overblown.

For the record, I'm no fan of That One or The Other One. In explanation to those who disparage us undecideds: Yes, of course I know their positions. Moderates, however, are moderates for a reason. I agree with and disagree with some of each candidate's policies, and have not yet been unable to decide which of my own values I'm willing to sacrifice in choosing a candidate.

Posted by: claretoo | October 8, 2008 1:43 PM | Report abuse

"That One" is just the singular form of the phrase "Those People".

John McCain was just using proper English when he referred to Obama as "That One" so I'm really not sure why the rest of those people are so upset?

Posted by: Freestinker | October 8, 2008 1:44 PM | Report abuse

I thought is was disrespectful. People are downplaying the comment, but imagine if Obama had referred to McCain that way. He'd be taking a lot of flack. You can dismiss it as age-related - that it's OK for an older person to refer to a younger person that way, but then try this .... Imagine that Obama's opponent was a white guy who is also 47 and then imagine that Obama referred to him as "that one." He would still get himself into trouble. Could the young white Republican call Obama "that one?" The Republican would take some flack, but not nearly as much as Obama would. Play out both scenarios in your head and see. It was definitely a racial-based comment, but not a conscious one. It's one of those disparities that is so entrenched in our culture that people don't even realize they are being rascist when they do it. Should it blow up into a major issue in the campaign? No, but it should draw comment and displeasure and McCain should be made aware of why it was wrong.

Posted by: skrut003 | October 8, 2008 1:45 PM | Report abuse

I don't think McCain's reference was racist, but I did find it disrespectful. I didn't "recoil" as the author suggested here, but I did pause for a moment. Obama may not like McCain (hard to say the true nature of the relationship since they are opponents in a very tight race and the Senate is a very exclusive brotherhood), but I've never witnessed him treat the senator from Illinois with such disdain.

What gave me greater concern was his comment to a young voter who asked a question about the economy. Within his answer, McCain assumed that the young man had never heard of Freddie Mac or Fannie Mae before the financial crisis. Does that mean that he think people are not well-read and informed about their country until there's a soundbite in the midst of a crisis? To me, that's even more disrespectful.

Posted by: teejackson_93 | October 8, 2008 1:45 PM | Report abuse

McCain makes the point that he can work well with others. Pointing to Obama and saying that one is not the kind of behavior that endears one. Maybe McCain's purpose was to demonstrate why he did not win Miss Congeniality. If so he made his point. At the same time he made the point that he makes enemies of people who are adversaries.

He would hardly be able to do something like hold successful negotiations with Iran by having an attitude like his. His jokes about bombing Iran and causing sickness to Iranians would be heavy baggage to come into negotiations with.

This is just another example of why McCain is not presidential material. The insult is simply an example of his ineptitude.

Posted by: Gator-ron | October 8, 2008 1:47 PM | Report abuse

Ms. Parker, is that the best you could do after sleeping in late and being tardy for work? McCain made his point concerning who voted for what on the Energy Bill; and you reinforced it. In the meantime, why don't you ask your news director if you can be transferred to announcing the weather? By the way; do you know what news article about the debate was the stupidest I've read? ^ That one.

OIFVetForMcCain

Posted by: palmettonajjar | October 8, 2008 1:47 PM | Report abuse

I am a physician who treats the elderly.

I think McCain was just having a senior moment. He really couldn't remember Obama's name, and so "that one" came out.


Posted by: drmyeyes | October 8, 2008 1:48 PM | Report abuse

Well, I don't think that calling Obama "That One" had quite the effect that he had hoped for...

http://shop.cafepress.com/that-one

The speed of this year's campaign is astonishing. He said it yesterday, and you can buy the tshirt today. Amazing.

Posted by: Gavin082 | October 8, 2008 1:50 PM | Report abuse

Isn't it a little more important to be worrying about WHO CAN EFFECTIVELY DO THE JOB!? Obama make speak more eloquently than McCain, but action speaks louder than words. I guess we'll see soon enough after all you yahoo's have voted NObama into office and we're no better than we are now! McCain in '08!

Posted by: BerrySherri | October 8, 2008 1:50 PM | Report abuse

Using inappropriate language is a reflection of the speaker, not necessarily of the targeted person. I do not use inappropriate language partly because I do not want to upset my Mom, my dearly departed Mom. It would be interesting to hear from Mrs. McCain, the senator's mother, on her son's behavior. The minimum quality of a President is to have dignity.

I don't know about Senator McCain, but the biggest insult anyone can give me is "Have your Mom taught you any manners?"

Posted by: PuWeiTa | October 8, 2008 1:51 PM | Report abuse

McCain, and especially that foul-mouthed, fake-Christian Palin, continue to show how mean and hateful they are, going for "the win" at any cost. Its the most disgusting display of disrespect I have ever seen in ANY campaign.

Posted by: GenuineRisk | October 8, 2008 1:51 PM | Report abuse

It's hard to tell if it was racist or just Grumpy Grampa yelling at the kids to get off the bed. The McCains are so disdainful -- they've got that $100 Million sense of entitlement that sunk other candidates earlier in the year. Somehow they've decided this was THEIR year and this upstart Obama is shaking up their plans. Cindy McCain had the gall to say the OBAMA campaign had been the dirtiest ever, when every objective pundit has used that label for McCain's sorry resurrection of the Bush 2000 South Carolina team. Did you notice the wives didn't even shake hands last night? "That one" may be used by your spouse (as some have noted above) but it's that sense of familiarity that oozes disrespect -- in a marriage there's love to go along with the cuts. No one could have looked at John McCain and seen any playfulness in his "that one" comment. He and Palin are engaged in a rapid descent to the bottom in a desperate play to stay viable. Ain't gonna work this time. Thanks, Kathleen Parker, for putting aside your preferences to write objectively about this stupid, self-inflicted shot McCain put into his own head.

Posted by: Omyobama | October 8, 2008 1:55 PM | Report abuse

Hahahaha. You've got to be kidding! Racist?? When you look for racism around every corner, no doubt you'll find it.

You people make me sick.

Posted by: _virginian_ | October 8, 2008 1:56 PM | Report abuse

Someone needs to change Sen. McPoo's diaper. His soiled it with his campaign strategery.

Posted by: VeloStrummer | October 8, 2008 1:58 PM | Report abuse

I am dismayed by the recent tenor of the McCain campaign, in particular, Sarah Palin's truly disturbing language against Senator Obama.

But, this one comment by McCain--That One- when seen as well as heard or read, doesn't come across as an arrogant, dismissive or loaded put-down, but rather as a reflexive sense of frustration and anger of being the victim. That is no excuse, but neither is a big deal.

Sarah Palin's behavior, however, is a big deal. Someone needs to yank her leash- hard!

Posted by: roberts4 | October 8, 2008 1:59 PM | Report abuse

"That One" reminds me of my grandmother's verbal tics. When she sees someone unusual looking or someone behaving strangely, she refers to them as "That One." McCain's use of it did strike me as old-fashioned, out-of-touch and most definitely cranky. It was also very disdainful... really awful. Sad to see a decent guy like McCain tumble this way. But he's following his "advisers."

Posted by: rdl114 | October 8, 2008 1:02 PM
****************************
Too bad you don't have greater respect for your grandmother. As you as patronizing toward her, as you are Senator McCain?

OIFVetForMcCain

Posted by: palmettonajjar | October 8, 2008 2:00 PM | Report abuse

"That one" reference from John McCain was made to emphatically deny and redirect the implication by Obama that McCain was doing a disservice by voting against an energy bill (which was laden with extra earmarks).

In reality, McCain was protecting the people of the United States from unnecessary extra spending while Obama and his greedy buddies had there hand in the jar.

This is the typical MO of the Democratic party when they develop bills. They add "pork" spending for pet projects (bear DNA testing, bridges to nowhere, wooden arrows, urban horticulture, etc.) on to vital bills using the criticality of the bill as leverage to get the pork they want.

Then, when conscience minded "congressionals" serve their constituents with honor and vote against the crap -- the Democrats point the finger at the honorable ones. This is why the Dems (and a few Republicans) need to be assimilated.

Posted by: mr_wizard | October 8, 2008 2:01 PM | Report abuse

I agree that this was a slip of the tongue and not particularly Freudian. We should all look past it to the real issues in the campaign. I do think McCain has been disrespectful in his body language, but I think the "angry" guy plays well to the core Republicans. Face it - "angry" is essentially the defining attitude of the anti-intellectual, narrow-minded, quasi-religious folks in the farther-right population (I'm aghast at the concept of "the warrior Jesus"). I hope that John McCain has enough of his old character left not to be really disrespectful.

AJD-PA said ""Let's talk about the shameless things that "that one" has done against McCain. We'll start with the ad that makes fun of McCain for not being able to use a computer...even knowing full well that McCain cannot use the computer for prolonged amounts of time because of his injuries when he was a POW in Vietnam. Yes, let's talk about disrespect!"

I don't know if this is true or not - I know Sen. McCain has difficulty with his joints. I certainly respect his service (although I'm do not think it makes him a presidential candidate - think Inouye). However, I don't believe that it is a disability that drives this. If he was actually interested in using the computer more, there are literally hundreds of tools to support the use of computers by disabled people - blind, paralyzed, deaf, etc.)

I support Obama and while I don't agree with everything he says, I do believe he has the intellectual capacity and curiosity as well as the communications skills to be a great president (things sadly lacking in our current POTUS). He also is not stuck in the 20th century as McCain understandably is because it was the century that defined his maturation, personality and worldview.

So my beef is not with McCain's personality per se, (although grumpy old man is not a particularly engaging character) but the experiences that created it.

Posted by: DisenfranchisedCommenter | October 8, 2008 2:03 PM | Report abuse

My guess is that McCain was simply using the phase coined by Oprah when she referred to Obama as "The One"

Posted by: C5Z06 | October 8, 2008 2:03 PM | Report abuse

Thanks to you and the rest of the politically correct police for protecting us from this invidious danger. Without people like you I wouldn't know when to be enraged by seemingly innocent speech. My pension may be dropping and my job may be in danger, but at least I have you to protect me from demontsrative adjectives.

Posted by: Loisland3 | October 8, 2008 2:04 PM | Report abuse

If Obama is the answer to all our prayers, then why is Reuters giving him merely a two point lead over McCain?"

gala1

Posted by: WillyHSmith |
******************************
First of all, knock off the messiah crap. You childish assertions make you look small and cheap - not to mention wrong:

Gallup Daily: Obama’s Lead Over McCain Expands to 11 NEW October 8, 2008
Barack Obama holds an 11-point lead over John McCain in the latest Gallup Poll Daily tracking report, 52% to 41%. This is the Obama’s highest level of support to date, and also represents his largest lead of the campaign

Speaking of get real - why don't you, gala?

Posted by: LABC | October 8, 2008 2:05 PM | Report abuse

The Manchurian candidate strikes again.

Posted by: moksha-4all | October 8, 2008 2:07 PM | Report abuse

It continues to amaze me how citizens not only believe every youtube or blog they read, they have come to rely on them for factual reference and daily news source.

Pathetic.

If you said, "well I saw it on youtube" or "I read it in a blog" 4 yrs ago you would have been laughed out of the room. Now ppl make accusatiosn and follow it with "I read it/saw it on the internet so it's true".

Sheep. All these ppl are acting as if they know who John McCain is? Have you ever met the guy? No. Sheep - you'll do whatever the new media wants you to do. You don't even care to find out who's controlling the media... would you eat chicken if it came from China? How about learning where your news comes from before spreading it as "truth". Sad.

Posted by: dreifort | October 8, 2008 2:07 PM | Report abuse

Yes, that one. That cassette player.

Posted by: peterdaol | October 8, 2008 2:08 PM | Report abuse

Who was that angry, old man wandering around the stage behind President Obama last night? Was he looking for the bathroom?

Posted by: atskippy | October 8, 2008 2:14 PM | Report abuse

Not a big deal. "That one" makes McCain "this one", in terms of semantic relationship. So it's just a colloquial jab, with some disrespect implied but no more than applied to himself.

Posted by: Neophoenix | October 8, 2008 12:59 PM

I agree completely. Nice to see someone else with a voice of reason in all this.

Posted by: jules72 | October 8, 2008 2:15 PM | Report abuse

Let's talk about the shameless things that "that one" has done against McCain. We'll start with the ad that makes fun of McCain for not being able to use a computer...even knowing full well that McCain cannot use the computer for prolonged amounts of time because of his injuries when he was a POW in Vietnam. Yes, let's talk about disrespect!

Posted by: AJD-PA | October 8, 2008 12:48 PM
=======================
OK.. he cannot use computer because of being a POW and yet can go fishing in his backyard. Which one is more strenuous?

Posted by: bigben1986 | October 8, 2008 2:21 PM | Report abuse

"That One" is just the singular form of the phrase "Those People".

John McCain was just using proper English when he referred to Obama as "That One" so I'm really not sure why the rest of those people are so upset?

Posted by: Freestinker | October 8, 2008 2:21 PM | Report abuse

The comment from John McCain at last nights second debate about “that one” wasn’t surprising. It didn’t shock us, because that’s what makes McCain so “Maverickicky.” John has been a sour puss for so long, that it’s almost unfair for us to complain about him. He’s been that way for years and there are countless video and sound bites that show him stomping out of a room, arguing with women and accounts of him swing at colleagues. Common people, he’s just being Maverickicky.

We also know that McCain has answers for everything. He has an answer for every question we ask him for example:

“Hey John: what time is it?” John: “Did you know I was a POW for five years?” “Hey John what’s the weather like tomorrow?” John: “I’ve been in public service all my life.” “Hey John: how are you going to fix the mortgage crisis?” John: “did you know I was a Navy pilot?”

Great answers, unfortunately they really don’t answer any of our questions. We shouldn’t get all shocked and surprised by his comments; his attack dog with lipstick does a lot of his dirty work now anyway, so he can look like he’s just an adorable gray haired teddy bear. He’s so cuddly isn’t he?

Posted by: Ahsay | October 8, 2008 2:25 PM | Report abuse

Damn, Cindy, I told you to get a larger size of Depends!!!!!

Posted by: Dipsy | October 8, 2008 2:27 PM | Report abuse

In order to gain respect we must give respect. “That One” was not a respectful comment; both candidates are Senators and should be addressed as such. I understand the frustration that we all have, both supporters for McCain and supporters for Obama. Overall there have been some very good points made by both candidates. I’ve watched both debates and I was very disappointed in the first, primarily because of the lack of communication between the two candidates. I want to see a president who is going to have respect, not only for cabinet leaders, but for the common American. I was a little disappointed with McCain for the lack of eye contact when addressing Obama, as if he were not present. In the second debate, I was a little more imprested on how most of the issues were addressed. As a voter, when you say you have something that you feel is going to be better for our country, I want to see them laid out (make me a believer). These debates are not a guessing game, nor are they reality TV shows. The American people want more than just promises, we want and need change. Americans want to have a clear understanding on where the leadership in this country is heading. No disrespect for McCain, but Obama is not only going to bring change as President of the United States Of America, he represents change for a Changing America!

Posted by: headzzzz | October 8, 2008 2:29 PM | Report abuse

Sadly, it was more than objectifying, it was HATEFUL AND NASTY. Obama and McCain serve in the same Senate, so since McCain is capable of making that statement, can you just imagine how he would "objectify" other foreign heads of state whom I must assume he hates even more than Obama?

Or maybe I am only kidding myself and McCain actually hates Obama more than he hates any other human being on earth. It truly is McCain's loss since he has managed to show himself for the a@@ he truly is and 'that person' has NO HONOR, NO CHARACTER, NO WISDOM AND NO MATURITY. It really must be h*ll to be 72 years of age and KNOW THAT EVERYONE ELSE KNOWS YOU REALLY ARE IMMATURE! How exactly does he plan to 'live that down' when he returns to the Senate in January? Oh, that's right, he NEVER HAS A PLAN FOR ANYTHING!!

He is an embarrassment to America and to Arizona, so I can only hope when he comes up for re-election they don't forgot the person he has shown to them and vote 'NO'!

Posted by: ObamasLady | October 8, 2008 2:31 PM | Report abuse

I still believe that using "that one" was highly disrespectful.

My take is that now McCain's campaign is trying to deshumanize Obama by portraying as the "other", somebody who doesn't fit the typical American, an unknown. Palin just did the same thing during her last meeting.

Posted by: eaglestrk01 | October 8, 2008 2:31 PM | Report abuse

McCain knows he's behind, and he knows he isn't going to win. He's 72 and time is running out. It's a bitter pill to swallow. He should've been the Republican candidate in 2000. I think he would've won. Instead we got meathead.

IMHO, what has transpired these past eight years would NOT have transprired had McCain been in office. I think the Bushies trashed him, and he was screwed out of his shot. Now it's happening again - another young man is challenging the old bull. Nor are the stars aligned in his favor once again. We're coming off of Bush and the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression. His choice of VP candidate was also a grasping at straws.

His campaign has been unfocused. Obama was for change. Suddenly McCain pirated that concept and he's about change a reform.

I also think we should stop calling these media events "debates." No one is debating anything. A question is asked and the candidates take it, twist it, and go off in another direction. I don't want to hear their stance on something - I've heard it before. I want to hear McCain tell me how his health plan differs from Obama's. I don't want him to critique Obama's plan - I want to see the differences and then I want McCain to argue why his will success as opposed to Obama's plan. It not enough for them to tell me "mine is better." Illustrate WHY it's better.

I'm not McCain fan - I think he's acted dishonorably during this campaign. I hope he takes defeat with honor in four weeks.

As for the twit, let her walk back to AK.

Posted by: itsagreatday1 | October 8, 2008 2:31 PM | Report abuse

Yeah, "that one" is definitely peeved about something. "That one" is hiding plenty. "That one" is indoctrinating children to sing his praises. Oh, fearless leader, let us bow to "that one."

Posted by: gengar843 | October 8, 2008 2:32 PM | Report abuse

McCain said "that one" because black people don't let white people use the N word anymore. His intention was to put down Obama.
If he talks like this on cameras I can only imagine how he talks on close doors. Maybe he thinks he can steam roll and crush people to get what he wants.
If the THAT ONE comment was not important, nobody would be talking about it right now.

Posted by: fernando1958 | October 8, 2008 2:32 PM | Report abuse

McCain is the embarrassing guest at the dinner party, the person who is a little loud, a little rude, but we are supposed to overlook these character flaws because really, he is a really nice guy. Right.

Posted by: homer4 | October 8, 2008 2:35 PM | Report abuse

I think it's interesting that no one has thought more deeply about what "That one" might mean. My father is in the early stages of Alzheimer's and when he forgets someone's name he'll often use statements like this. "That one", "the other one with you", "the other person" etc. I know that happens with other Alzheimer patients as well. (And it even happens to others of us who don't have Alzheimer's!) I think McCain just had a mental lapse and honestly couldn't think of his name and "that one" is just what came out.

Posted by: MMinnesota | October 8, 2008 2:37 PM | Report abuse

"no madame, not that tie, the other one.... yes, THAT ONE"...

Posted by: fernando1958 | October 8, 2008 2:41 PM | Report abuse

McCain's "that one" comment has a much larger historical context; remember, slaves were counted 3/5 of a person during the formative years of the United States. Slaves were objects to please their masters and work their plantations, care for the children and be their bed wenches (ask Thomas Jefferson about Sally Hemming). While I don't believe McCain was trying to be overtly racist, the objectification language was quite inartful, especially since McCain and Obama are peers in the United States Senate.

Posted by: meldupree | October 8, 2008 2:41 PM | Report abuse

To the tune of Beatles' "This Boy"

That one... pals around with Ayers
makes believe he cares....
But this one... can't believe his bull

That one... has a plan to tax
the rich, but he attacks
him- self.. that one is rich too

Oh... and that one
won't be happy
til America
is destroy-oy-oy-oyed

That one
won't be happy
til he sees it fa-a-a-alll

That one... can't admit he's wrong
a sign he isn't so strong
and that one.. won't be President

That one... bum bum bum bum
That one... dum dum dum dum

Posted by: gengar843 | October 8, 2008 2:41 PM | Report abuse

Hey Independent4tw and others who say (unbelievably) that McCain's computer illiteracy has to do with his wartime injuries... what kind of kool-aid are you people drinking?

McCain's a Luddite, pure and simple. He can't use a computer because he's neither taken the time nor had the interest to learn. In this, the information age, the age of the internet and email, a man who presumes to become POTUS cannot even send an email or access the internet on his own? This is beyond the Palin, if that's possible.

Posted by: alanms | October 8, 2008 2:42 PM | Report abuse

"It continues to amaze me how citizens not only believe every youtube or blog they read, they have come to rely on them for factual reference and daily news source.

Pathetic.

If you said, "well I saw it on youtube" or "I read it in a blog" 4 yrs ago you would have been laughed out of the room. Now ppl make accusatiosn and follow it with "I read it/saw it on the internet so it's true".

Sheep. All these ppl are acting as if they know who John McCain is? Have you ever met the guy? No. Sheep - you'll do whatever the new media wants you to do. You don't even care to find out who's controlling the media... would you eat chicken if it came from China? How about learning where your news comes from before spreading it as "truth". Sad."

Excuse me, but FYI the debates were LIVE!

Posted by: headzzzz | October 8, 2008 2:46 PM | Report abuse

McCain's "That one" reminded me of one of my favorite movies, Blazing Saddles. Unfortunately, McCain is serious, although it sounds like a parody. ... like Mel Brooks' "Can't you see that that man is a Ni", when discussing Cleavon Little as the new sheriff for Rock Ridge.

Posted by: athomedad | October 8, 2008 2:47 PM | Report abuse

"It continues to amaze me how citizens not only believe every youtube or blog they read, they have come to rely on them for factual reference and daily news source."

Excuse me, but FYI the debates were LIVE!

Posted by: headzzzz | October 8, 2008 2:47 PM | Report abuse

This is so funny. How about analyzing the disrespectful looks Mr. 'wide-smile' obama was giving to mccain while mccain was speaking. You could see it in the background. Obama looked so hateful. Almost like if he had a weapon he would have attacked mccain. Obama's expressions and looks scared the h*ll out of me!!!

Posted by: carolinanc2002 | October 8, 2008 2:48 PM | Report abuse

Geez, you people need to get a life. Debating the "that one" comment??? Parker has such an important job writing about this (yea, right).
And the comments???.....Right out of the "Elitists R Us" playbook.

Posted by: datacrown | October 8, 2008 2:50 PM | Report abuse

"I'm don't think it was racist, as some have argued. But it was objectifying. "That one" isn't the same as "that man." One is an object; the other is a person. A human being. 'That one' has a dehumanizing effect and one is right to recoil."

Here is one definition of racism Kathleen.

"Racism is the belief that a particular race is superior or inferior to another, that a person’s social and moral traits are predetermined by his or her inborn biological characteristics. Racial separatism is the belief, most of the time based on racism, that different races should remain segregated and apart from one another.

Racism has existed throughout human history. It may be defined as the hatred of one person by another -- or the belief that another person is less than human -- because of skin color, language, customs, place of birth or any factor that supposedly reveals the basic nature of that person. It has influenced wars, slavery, the formation of nations, and legal codes."

http://www.adl.org/hate-patrol/racism.asp

Posted by: mbrown43 | October 8, 2008 2:50 PM | Report abuse

I am a physician who treats the elderly.

I think McCain was just having a senior moment. He really couldn't remember Obama's name, and so "that one" came out.

One can only imagine another "senior moment" when McCain is in the room with a world leader with whom he disagrees. But wait, what am I thinking? That's never gonna happen because McCain's losing this election.

Posted by: alanms | October 8, 2008 2:50 PM | Report abuse

Walking about while "that one" is presenting his side of an issue in contrast to sitting and listening to attacks from one's critic should go down in history of body language with "checking the time on a watch" or being unshaven.
That ended this campaign.

Posted by: harperglenn | October 8, 2008 2:54 PM | Report abuse

Carolinanc2002 -

I thought Obama was actually doing a pretty good job. I think he listened carefully, and the smile was there to keep him from being disrespectful to McCain's fabulation. Surprisingly, this was mentioned by several folks on CNN after the debate. Not that CNN is the only voice, but it has been a bit of a "via media" in the FoxNews vs. MSNBC media partisanship.

Posted by: DisenfranchisedCommenter | October 8, 2008 2:54 PM | Report abuse

It is pretty clear by now that McSame and Caribou Barbie are appealing to the White Aryan Nation vote. Her rally in Florida looked like a Klan meeting and had all the same ugly overtones. The Karma Police are going to pay these two a visit...

Posted by: braultrl | October 8, 2008 2:55 PM | Report abuse

That one....gender neutral, race neutral, age neutral....perfectly PC.

Posted by: chrisc20170 | October 8, 2008 2:55 PM | Report abuse

gengar...uhh, we are reduced to awkwardly inserting idiotic lyrics to great songs? really?

Posted by: LABC | October 8, 2008 3:00 PM | Report abuse

Personally, I can't wait to hear Letterman's monologue tonight - he's been hysterically right on target in this campaign.

Posted by: DisenfranchisedCommenter | October 8, 2008 3:00 PM | Report abuse

AJD-PA
Lame excuse. My brother had ALS for 6 years - couldn't move ANYTHING BUT HIS EYES, and he was not only able to use the computer, he led an online bible study. I cannot stand the way the whole POW experience is used as an excuse. That's a strength of character issue. It doesn't sound anything like the John McCain that we are being sold - the mavericky, can do, challenge the status quo guy. If he wanted to do it, he would have found a way.
Next?

Posted by: pbh4935 | October 8, 2008 3:02 PM | Report abuse

What of Oprah's comment then?

"For the very first time in my life, I feel compelled to stand up and to speak out for the man who I believe has a new vision for America," and told the audience of 15,000 said, "I am here to tell you, Iowa, he is the one. He is the one!"

Posted by: PhillyDave | October 8, 2008 3:03 PM | Report abuse

I have a friend who is a 74 year old vietnam veteran. He is well educated, but he is more like McCain in his mannerisms. Though I wouldn't call him a racist he often is fascinated with people of color or of asian origin. He will start talking about their physical features as if it is something that needs to be noted like a museum art piece.

In McCain's mind he was itching to make personal attacks on Obama, since he had already taken that path on the ads and through Sarah Palin. Also his questioning of "who is Barack Obama?" is supposed to convey that Obama doesn't fit in with what McCain considers as the American people. I would consider his utterance of "that one" as his anoyance in losing to an african american. Both Bill Clinton and John McCain have a tough time coming to terms with losing to an african american. They both think that there is an "invisible population" who are racists at heart and they want to reach out to them without publicly showing that they are in that invisible population". It was a low blow, but I don't think Obama or his camp is going to make a big deal out it.

Posted by: JimFargo | October 8, 2008 3:03 PM | Report abuse

McCain expressed the puerile contempt of partisans for opposing partisans. From far away, McCain looks like rubber-vomit.

Posted by: snowyphile | October 8, 2008 3:05 PM | Report abuse

I found the "that one" comment jarring and harsh. I thought it made McCain appear mean-spirited and angry. It mattered to me, genuinely, and I have to believe it matters to others as well.

Obama '08 for me.

Posted by: motorcitymarionette | October 8, 2008 3:08 PM | Report abuse

As several posters already mentioned, there really is nothing left to talk about in this campaign. In fact, I've already voted.

SPOILER ALERT: Ralph Nader is on the ballot this year.

Posted by: rob_miller_2008 | October 8, 2008 3:10 PM | Report abuse

LABC - get some talent and post your comeback in lyric form. Otherwise, as Cartman says, suck my balls.

Posted by: gengar843 | October 8, 2008 3:13 PM | Report abuse

Actually Kathleen, there was no implicit hypocrisy--the bill Obama voted for ALSO contained language eliminating the "Enron Exception" codified by Phil Gramm's wife when she was at CFTC that made specualtion in energy futures legal. And it contained money for alternative fuel research & development--THAT'S why McCain voted no--not out of honor, principle or anything but self aggrandizing politics.

Posted by: bklyndan22 | October 8, 2008 3:14 PM | Report abuse

How disrespectful of you!

"For example, if McCain wanted to win in a landslide, all he'd have to do is put a DVD of Chris Rock Kill the Messenger in every mailbox. Or run it on the networks right after the last debate."

I think you; yourself have shown clearly, why you are a McCain supporter. And the type of person you are both anger and bitter. Why??? Its one thing to show your support for your candidate, but when you single out specifics like this, that’s shameful. What does Chris Rock’s comedy have to do with Obama? The only thing they have in common is that they are both African American. So how are you comparing them? Why would watching him change any voters mind?


Posted by: headzzzz | October 8, 2008 3:15 PM | Report abuse

If anyone for one moment thinks/thought as ajnairus and other comments think for one moment that the comment by Senator McCain referring to Senator Obama as "That One" was a fond indulgent (junior in age or someone calling their child) you're mistaken - it was a Racist remark plain and simple just like the "N" word. Bad move by his staff to have Se. NcCain wear a corsett that was obvious. Sen. McCain, didn't have answers so he repeated answers by Sen. Obama had made regarding questions that were asked. The other "MAJOR Slap in the face" was to the young Minority gentleman who asked a question and Sen. McCain came back with Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac "but of course "YOU" have probably never heard of them? What? Everyone that reads or watches TV has heard of these two companies. If Senator Obama had made this statement referring to Senator McCain there would be total outrage and not only by minorities as the McCain camp tries to spin. Sen. McCain plans to help with the mortgage crisis? Really, considering this is already in the bailout package - maybe Sen. McCain should have taken the time or his staff to read the bailout bill "Mortgae help" it's already in the package?

Posted by: Jean10 | October 8, 2008 3:18 PM | Report abuse

Jean10: you're an idiot. He said "you probably never heard of Fannie or Freddie before the current crisis."

Posted by: gengar843 | October 8, 2008 3:21 PM | Report abuse

What of Oprah's comment then? Did Senator Obama pay her to say it? Did he tell her to say it? Is he using the phrase in his campaign?

What a strange comment!

The "that one" comment comes off as odd, at the least. And do recall Senator McClain's hand gesture, hand in the air, like "don't let him hear me say this" and pointing at Senator Obama.

But it's all silliness, it's the silly season.

What is absolutely, 100 % quite amazing is that, of all of the anti Obama rhetoric in this post, I have yet to come across one fact that is not tinged by emotion or shaded by some form of subjectiveness, That's interesting.

Since I said this, I will tell you two reasons that I will not vote for McCain.

1. He keeps on talking about "victory" in Iraq. Who are we going to declare victory against? If we leave, who will we surrender to? I don't necessarily think that we should leave, but for gosh sakes tell us the truth - "I think we need to maintain a presence in Iraq to insure a stable Middle East"
2. His health care plan is totally useless to anyone without insurance, and is based on a theory that IF we allow the health care market to assume status as a free market comodity that everything will work just fine, and people will get GREAT deals. Without going into extreme detail, that's what's known as magical thinking. Secondly, please tell me how the family without health care, that can't afford it, is going to be able to use that $5,000 tax credit to purchase their health insurance at anywhere from $400 to $650 per month? Where are they going to get the outlay? People like Senator McCain forget that not everyone has access to capital.

Posted by: JohnDinHouston | October 8, 2008 3:23 PM | Report abuse

We need to understand the Obama people are not blind, nor stupid.

They have CHOSEN this path.

This is not an intellectual crisis, but a spiritual one.

If someone as secretive, shady, unknown, and malleable as Obama can become the object of adoration, I conclude that there IS a messiah syndrome.

Note "Alpha Omega" teens in uniforms.

Note children singing "fearless leader."

Note Germany with chant "O-ba-ma."

Note swooning.

Note inability for Obama to ever say he has been wrong about ANYTHING.

Note ACORN with voter fraud in nine states.

Note Obama worked for ACORN, Bill Ayers gave Obama $50million to distribute, that some of that money went to ACORN, and that some of that money went to Reverend Wright. There IS a network.

Note responses to my post.

Posted by: gengar843 | October 8, 2008 3:24 PM | Report abuse

JohnDinHouston:

re iraq: McCain said nearly the exact thing you said you wanted to hear. Maintain a presence. Vital for stability in the region.

re health care: I agree. I don't understand it either. But since I don't understand it, I can't say anything bad either. Obama acts like he understands McCain's proposal, but HIS explanation made no sense either!

Posted by: gengar843 | October 8, 2008 3:27 PM | Report abuse

At first I was jolted when he said "That one!"

But then, it occurred to me that he had forgotten Senator Obama's name.

Posted by: lisa9 | October 8, 2008 3:27 PM | Report abuse

Well, the debate proved at least one thing beyond any doubt. It is possible to be 72-years-old and immature.

Posted by: trace1 | October 8, 2008 3:29 PM | Report abuse

lisa9: You might be right. It could also be he wanted to make an "outsider" jibe to make it look like Obama is dangerous.

No different than saying McCain is "erratic." All a perspective.

Posted by: gengar843 | October 8, 2008 3:30 PM | Report abuse

You've got to be kidding us, right? In a debate where both candidates addressed the issues competently, it's disappointing that people would use media outlets to make a mountain out of ant hill. It seems that a seamless performance that both candidates delivered is not salacious enough to report.

Posted by: jay34095912003 | October 8, 2008 3:36 PM | Report abuse

Let's talk about the shameless things that "that one" has done against McCain. We'll start with the ad that makes fun of McCain for not being able to use a computer...even knowing full well that McCain cannot use the computer for prolonged amounts of time because of his injuries when he was a POW in Vietnam. Yes, let's talk about disrespect!

-----------------------------------
Give it up; McSame himself said he was not familiar with email and wasn't computer savvy; not because of his POW injuries, but because he never bothered to learn. That's not a handicap, that's out of touch. 75% of all the information I receive these days is through my computer. Most corporate and Governmental offices would shut down if their computer system crashed for more than 6 hours. The federal government has a paperless mandate in place--that's how important it is to be competent in computer usage. John McCain doesn't know, and he just does not get it!

Posted by: Beingsensible | October 8, 2008 3:51 PM | Report abuse

"That one"? You need to understand the slang from the barrio. The gunsels use the Spanish "ese" when addressing somebody they don't respect. Literally, it's an objective pronoun. It's a challenge to fight. "Hey, Ese, you don't have no business here. Get the hell out."

This figure of speech is common in Los Angeles, probably in Phoenix, too. It's a linguistic taunt that's more insulting than "that one" in English.

I don't think McCain's use of the term was unintentional.

Posted by: gnusey | October 8, 2008 4:08 PM | Report abuse

Whoa, gengar843 --
Are you being deafened/blinded by some black helicopters from the UN coming to take away American freedom? Because someone has a personality and vision that encourages people to join in and support a cause does not make them Nazis, fascists, or even demagogues. Are you going to tell me the signs and clothing on display at the Palin rally in Jacksonville aren't exactly the same as your examples, if not worse? The whole Ayers thing is a red herring (pardon the pun). The guy has done nothing but support education for the last 20 years - and he has recanted his Weatherman activities (I guess you never made a mistake as a teen - I certainly did some things I'm not particularly proud of). And as far as admitting mistakes, I don't think Obama can hold a candle to the denial of the current administration who invaded a country, left afghanistan to muddle through, essentially rewrote the constitution and is only now being brought to task - and remember W couldn't think of a mistake he had ever made. I don't mind you disagreeing with policies or political stances, but the drivel in that post is not productive in any adult conversation. Sorry to be harsh, but I grew up in the south and I experienced what real demagogues (e.g. George Wallace, Lester Maddox, Knights of the Ku Klux Klan) could do to people and lead people to do.

Posted by: DisenfranchisedCommenter | October 8, 2008 4:08 PM | Report abuse

Thank you for your courage in writing this story!

Posted by: GTFOOH | October 8, 2008 4:18 PM | Report abuse

There are three separate but softly linked issues at play here.

1. McCain made a poor choice when he used "that one," I am an Obama supporter and I do not believe (or at least I hope) that McCain said this with racial concerns in mind.

2. The good senator has been in politics long enough to know that the intention is rarely scrutinized and reaction is what matters. Out of context, it looks terrible. If you read the "that one" line by itself--if you just look for the soundbite--it is nothing short of perceptible racism.

3. When you combine McCain's body language, his tone and his dismissive treatment of Obama, "that one" sounds even worse. I understand modern politics' thinking that rivals should not use others' names out loud, because it gives "free advertising," but let's be serious. Is anyone going to be swayed to the other side if McCain uses Obama's name aloud? This seems more likely to lend ammunition to the left (myself included, despite knowing better) that he couldn't remember his name. That at 72, we cannot elect a man we know could be in a state of decline.

I don't think John McCain is a racist. I think he dislikes Obama - that he feels with his 72 years of life and 26 years of service, he is entitled to the presidency. No one is entitled to the presidency. McCain's failure isn't of racial tolerance. His failure is in evoking sexism on behalf of his vice presidential candidate, while making comments that can easily be construed as racism.

Posted by: Keuric | October 8, 2008 4:18 PM | Report abuse

This One
That One
Rats and Cats
Wackyadidoodledithat

My friends
its time
to take
my hat.

Posted by: Doktor | October 8, 2008 4:19 PM | Report abuse

Gengar843 is mostly likely a luddite that believes that dinosaurs and humans co-existed a few thousand years ago, that Jimmy Carter is responsible for the bad-lending in the 2000s, that corporations will self-report their crimes, that the world is flat, that birth control is bad, and that Republicans have family values.

Good stuff. Now go sweep the floor at your creationism museum.

Posted by: bhuang2 | October 8, 2008 4:23 PM | Report abuse

"That One" was the gaffe of the night. Even worse than "Not you, Tom..."

And you know, I used to like McCain. The poor guy has sold out on every principle which made him admirable, and he isn't even going to win the election. It's just sad watching what this man has become...

Posted by: jerkhoff | October 8, 2008 4:24 PM | Report abuse

Oh, boo hooo... Mac referred to me as "that one". Call my mommy..

What about "lipstick on a pig", or all those sexist comments Hussein dished during the primaries?

He's a wimp. Can you picture him talking to the president of Iran: "boo hoo, you called me an imperialist. I will never talk to you again. Boo hoo...Michelle!!"

Posted by: cintronlourdes | October 8, 2008 4:24 PM | Report abuse

Hasn't McCain run out of benefits of the doubt?

Posted by: MShake | October 8, 2008 4:25 PM | Report abuse

For the record, I didn't think it was racist. I thought it was more like saying something you say to a child (I've often said something similar when joking about my kids). What it does indicate is a lack of respect for Obama, his opinions, and by extension, his supporters. McCain keeps claiming he is somehow the 'bipartisan' candidate, but his entire campaign has been dismissive of Obama and his supporters. He has implied many times that people like myself support Obama because he is 'popular', not because they think he is a highly intelligent person who has the best solutions to the issues of our time.

You cannot truly work toward bipartisan solutions unless you start with a position of respect for the other side and their points of view.

Posted by: jak2 | October 8, 2008 4:29 PM | Report abuse

I'm an Obama supporter. I don't believe McCain intended to be racist, and yes, we have bigger problems. In fact, these enormous problems demand, as McCain is fond of saying, someone who can reach across the aisle and bring about some unity to tackle the problems. Someone who gets so flustered in a debate (in the format that he's so crazy about) that he gets that rancorous or at best, thoughtless, isn't likely to be the one who can do that.

Posted by: cgold | October 8, 2008 4:31 PM | Report abuse

cintronlourdes - I don't believe Sen. Obama has said anything about this - it is the buzz, not attributable to the candidate himself. I doubt Obama even noticed it - I didn't. And you may recall that both Obama and McCain had used the lipstick remark before Palin was a gleam/beam in anyone's eye. BTW - I heard that joke first applied to diva sopranos, and I thought it was lame then.

Posted by: DisenfranchisedCommenter | October 8, 2008 4:32 PM | Report abuse

Giving McCain the benefit of the doubt, I suspect he was merely expressing contempt for Obama's position and the implicit hypocrisy

Wrong again, Ms. Parker. He was expressing contempt for Obama himself -- "that one" -- the one who is not worthy to be named, and who is not one of us. You are naive. But then again, it is not possible to be a right winger without being either naive or a pig. And I'll give you the benefit of the doubt on that.

Posted by: davidscott1 | October 8, 2008 4:33 PM | Report abuse

to the poster who said "I don't believe Sen. Obama has said anything about this - it is the buzz, not attributable to the candidate himself. "

Of course he hasnt. Rule of poltics: when your opponent does something really stupid in plain view of millions, shut up. People have ears.

Posted by: davidscott1 | October 8, 2008 4:35 PM | Report abuse

The statement is nothing other than what it was - I'm much younger than McCain and I sometimes go through all of my children's names before I get the right one. I support Obama on the issues and firmly believe he is "That One" - who will be President in 08. McCain, unfortunately lost me with his pick of "Chance" Palin which was nothing than a cynical attempt to reign in his base, or whatever bs they call it now.....maybe "Those Ones"

Posted by: bendersx6 | October 8, 2008 4:48 PM | Report abuse

I missed the "That One" comment at first because let's face it, McCains' "my friends"(only 18 times!) was really grating on me. However the "gotcha" media McCain so loves, made sure to point it out. To me(as I'm sure many others)the unspoken is very important. Obama gave him eye contact and was listening to him, but what was McCain doing? I even saw him with his eyes closed. Mr. Potter, I mean, John McCain is going from bad to worse. The old man's gonna fight to the end so Obama supporters: don't believe the polls, don't believe the hype, keep going! Visit your battleground states and talk to those undecided voters. We need them!

Posted by: goheidigo | October 8, 2008 4:51 PM | Report abuse

I totally agree. By concocting some false and scary image of Obama as "the other" and less than human (more the enemy within), McCain's camp is perilously close to inciting violence against a person who may be our first black president ever. It is extremely irresponsible. This is the stuff that discrimination is made of and race-based violence as well. Not to overstate this all, but just by way of analogy, the Jews were dehumanized and that allowed for the Holocaust and gays are dehumanized all the time and this allows for violence against them and a total dismissal of them as human beings.

McCain is confusing the crazies that listen to Hannity and show up at his rallies yelling "terrorist!" with the sea of other more sane Americans. Because his hateful and absurd tactics are working on those lunatics somehow he thinks they will work on the rest of us. He is way off in terms of his commercials, stump tone, and use of "That one" at the debate. Yes, that rallies the lunies, but not normal Americans, Mr. McCain. You've lost all touch with reality.

Posted by: bmorebent | October 8, 2008 4:57 PM | Report abuse

The double standard applied to Obama and his wife is ridiculous. Just today Cindy McCain is out there chanting about what "we" will do for the country and what "we" will do when we run this country and get to the White House. Imagine the outrage if Michelle Obama had said those things. Imagine the outrage if Michelle Obama had been a member or supporter of a state secessionist party. And they are elite and not the McCain's, with Cindy's $300,000 outfit at the convention. And on and on and on. It is absurd. I have to believe race is at the heart of it and at the heart of why many Americans just don't feel comfortable with Obama and feel he is not like them.

Posted by: bmorebent | October 8, 2008 5:04 PM | Report abuse

ACCEPTING CAMPAIGN CONTRIBUTIONS FROM ASSOCIATES OF KNOWN TERRORISTS?

The Ayers-Weber-McCain connection. Truth? Guilt by Association? We report. YOU Decide!

Arnold R. "Arnie" Weber is a Chicago Annenberg Board Member and Chicago "insider". He was an Assistant Secretary of Labor and Associate Director of the Office of Management and Budget under President Richard Nixon. Arnie Weber, has held other Washington "insider" jobs, was former president of the Commercial Club of Chicago’s Civic Committee, and is a longtime REPUBLICAN donor. Arnie Weber was a member of the infamous **Chicago Annnenberg Challenge** Board, which was founded by known "TERRORIST" Bill Ayers!

Sarah "Barracuda" Palin was pointing out the "guilt by association" connection with Senator Barack Obama, a member of the same board. This, however, is a two way street and Ms. Palin may not understand this. The simple fact is, BY PALIN'S OWN DEFINITION, John McCain has accepted "tainted" campaign money from Arnie Weber, an associate of Bill Ayers.

Arnie Weber has given the legal limit of $1,500 to the McCain campaign in 2008. It's true! In 2008, Arnie Weber made two separate donations of $1,000 and $500 to McCain’s presidential campaign run by ex-lobbyist RICK DAVIS.

I strongly urge Senator McCain to renounce this man and his "terrorist associates", and to reject these donations. John McCain should investigate how such a thing could possibly happen inside his own campaign before seeking to cast stones at Senator Obama. RICK DAVIS needs to explain to the American voters his reasons for accepting this money. Are they really that desperate?

THE "LIBERAL MEDIA" SHOULD ASK JOHN MCCAIN WHY HE ACCEPTED TAINTED CAMPAIGN CONTRIBUTIONS FROM THIS "TERRORIST" ASSOCIATE. Arnie Weber doesn't deny that he associated for years with a "known terrorist". This is probably because he hasn't been asked.

It turns out that these types of "facts" are simply baseless smear attacks with no merit. They are meant to distract the less informed voters near the end of a campaign. You don't hear about them very often because most people want to talk about REAL issues affecting REAL lives, not play "6 degrees of Kevin Bacon".

For example, it turns out that you can trace Obama's family tree to both George W. Bush (10th cousins once removed) and Dick Cheney (eighth cousins). This is yet another useless "fact" for Trivial Pursuit, but not worthy of time in this national election. Guilt by association is an attack on voters and on the democratic process. Voters need to learn about the issues.

Some associations, however, do need scrutiny. RICK DAVIS is worth talking about. Why? If a person is running the campaign and at the same time is profiting financially as a lobbyist, the American voter has a right to know the details. The information on RICK DAVIS is here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rick_Davis_%28politics%29

HERE IS A MAN THAT MADE MILLIONS AS A WASHINGTON LOBBYIST. This guy is a caricature of the very thing that John McCain claims over and over again that he "hates". EARMARKS ANYONE? Rick Davis PRACTICALLY INVENTED EARMARKS. He launched his lobbying career straight from a Reagan White House job! McCain calls that "revolving door" politics. Now RICK DAVIS is CEO for the McCain presidential campaign.

How can we believe John McCain is against wasteful government spending after learning about his campaign manager?

Posted by: wunderwood | October 8, 2008 5:08 PM | Report abuse

I agree with wretched_hyena

McCain had a brain freeze, short term memory lapse, from stress on an old-timers brain.

Besides the chair confused him during a good portion of the debate.

McCain could not even get on to his chair to sit down on it. He just kind of leaned against it. Then realized standing beside it with his arm resting on the back looked like he was more in control of the chair. I think if he had gotten onto the chair he might of fell off.

Palin on the cover of Vogue magazine. Now what is that? Wink Wink

Posted by: gauthor | October 8, 2008 5:15 PM | Report abuse

Though for many it would be unthinkable, remember that Arizona and Sen. McCain voted against the Martin L. King holiday that we all celebrate.

So, "that one" is not a stretch.

Posted by: jrubin1 | October 8, 2008 5:23 PM | Report abuse

CNN had a group of people in Ohio that would watch the debate and would click a monitor about things they liked and disliked. For the most part (85%) the curves for men and female went up (liked) of what Obama said. 15% (liked) what McCan said, mostly the patriotic themes. Prior to the debate they said they would expect to hear "specifics" and not generalities. After the debate MOST of the supposedly "independents" (55%-60%) voters n the room said that "if the election were to be held today they would vote for......McCain." Do you understand this? 85% loved Obama and 55%-60% would vote for mCCain. Independents, my ass...

Posted by: thinkbeforeyoutalk | October 8, 2008 5:29 PM | Report abuse

I too was so angry that I registered to make this comment.
Posted by: middleclassmom1 | October 8, 2008 1:05 PM

___________________________________________

"I was so angry". That about captures it.

John McCain is indeed a very angry man who radiates disdain for his opponent. We see it in his body language, his facial expressions, his aloofness, his condescending words. "That one" is just the latest and pithiest example.

It isn't about Obama's race--it's about an upstart getting in the way of John's ambitions.

Why is this stuff important? John McCain would have us believe that he's a man of honor ("country first!") who will be the steady, experienced hand at the tiller; who knows how to bring opponents to the table and get things done.

Yet his actions in this campaign fairly scream the exact opposite:

--Surprising the media and the electorate with a transparently unqualified VP pick.

--Stunts like 'suspending' his campaign and airdropping presidential politics into the midst of bailout negotiations.

--Running nearly 100% negative ads full of distortions, outright lies and guilt-by-association.

--A thoroughly hostile demeanor towards his opponent that is by turns condescending, insulting, dismissive, and Just Plain Rude.

Like a horde of termites attacking a proud edifice, these behaviors fatally undermine the central messages of his campaign. There's only one guy at the top of this race who appears genuinely ready to extend the hand of friendship to those who oppose him, and it isn't John McCain.

Posted by: youarestillidiots | October 8, 2008 5:32 PM | Report abuse

Let's say that we are in a meeting at work. I am trying to make a point about something you said.

Instead of calling you by your name, I point and say "That one said ....."

Posted by: Ifindthiswholesituationdestressing | October 8, 2008 5:38 PM | Report abuse

Ummm. "That one..." The arrogance smacks of familiarity, don't you think? You remember: the bully headed for detox in January, '09.

Posted by: drjillshackford | October 8, 2008 5:44 PM | Report abuse

"that one" is kind of rude.

I believe that...And all his noise about disrespect and racism engendered by those two words speaks volumes about our country.

When Obama did his "f aux face touch flipping off of Hillary", I DID'T see ANY main stream media carrying it on their front page. No CNN, MSNBC or even FOX news pundits spoke of it. George Stepanopolous did mention Obama's carefully choreographed hip hop routine in two speeches after the PA debate. He spoke of hip hop but no flips off.

Only the Washington Post put the question on its front page blog section (bottem, left corner). I paraphrase "Did Obama flip off Hillary"? subtitle "AND DO YOU THINK IT WILL HELP HIM WITH THE MALE VOTE?"

Now you know why I AND MANY OTHERS WILL NEVER vote Obama.

This country could have benefited greatly by having a President Hillary Clinton. Now especially. They chose a man for this longest running American "old boys' club". And should Obama win, we will get the mediocre, at best, man yet again instead of the superior woman.

Posted by: celested9 | October 8, 2008 6:16 PM | Report abuse

"that one" is kind of rude.

I believe that...And all his noise about disrespect and racism engendered by those two words speaks volumes about our country.

When Obama did his "f aux face touch flipping off of Hillary", I DID'T see ANY main stream media carrying it on their front page. No CNN, MSNBC or even FOX news pundits spoke of it. George Stepanopolous did mention Obama's carefully choreographed hip hop routine in two speeches after the PA debate. He spoke of hip hop but no flips off.

Only the Washington Post put the question on its front page blog section (bottem, left corner). I paraphrase "Did Obama flip off Hillary"? subtitle "AND DO YOU THINK IT WILL HELP HIM WITH THE MALE VOTE?"

Now you know why I AND MANY OTHERS WILL NEVER vote Obama.

This country could have benefited greatly by having a President Hillary Clinton. Now especially. They chose a man for this longest running American "old boys' club". And should Obama win, we will get the mediocre, at best, man yet again instead of the superior woman.

Posted by: celested9 | October 8, 2008 6:17 PM | Report abuse

"This one" is voting for "that one" and not you,McCain.

Posted by: egghd1697 | October 8, 2008 6:17 PM | Report abuse

Ms. Parker wrote: "Giving McCain the benefit of the doubt, I suspect he was merely expressing contempt for Obama's position..."

If that were the only slip, I'd agree. But in the first debate, he wouldn't make eye contact...ever. His entire body language shows contempt for Obama, the man.

What I can't understand is the reason for contempt. Is it because he had the audacity to run for President at age 46? That's certainly no reason for contempt. Any one can run and it's up to the voters to say whether they agree or disagree.

Senator Biden said it best during the debate, that you may disagree with someone's views, but you don't challenge their motive. I'm sure both candidates believe they are best suited to lead the country. Americans deserve better than Senator McCain.

Posted by: amaikovich | October 8, 2008 6:23 PM | Report abuse

I second Ide2C, "Much ado about nothing."

I, too, will be voting for Obama and am generally a liberal, more or less (I have a conservative spike on my graph here and there). But this Orwellian surveillance for every possible politically incorrect nuance in every phrase uttered both by public figures and in our daily lives has gotten way, way out of hand.

There was more freedom of speech under Mao's Cultural Revolution than there is in this country today, and my fellow liberals are the main perpetrators of the chill.

Posted by: mcdooley | October 8, 2008 6:25 PM | Report abuse

There are three separate but softly linked issues at play here.

1. McCain made a poor choice when he used "that one," I am an Obama supporter and I do not believe (or at least I hope) that McCain said this with racial concerns in mind.

2. The good senator has been in politics long enough to know that the intention is rarely scrutinized and reaction is what matters. Out of context, it looks terrible. If you read the "that one" line by itself--if you just look for the soundbite--it is nothing short of perceptible racism.

3. When you combine McCain's body language, his tone and his dismissive treatment of Obama, "that one" sounds even worse. I understand modern politics' thinking that rivals should not use others' names out loud, because it gives "free advertising," but let's be serious. Is anyone going to be swayed to the other side if McCain uses Obama's name aloud? This seems more likely to lend ammunition to the left (myself included, despite knowing better) that he couldn't remember his name. That at 72, we cannot elect a man we know could be in a state of decline.

I don't think John McCain is a racist. I think he dislikes Obama - that he feels with his 72 years of life and 26 years of service, he is entitled to the presidency. No one is entitled to the presidency. McCain's failure isn't of racial tolerance. His failure is in evoking sexism on behalf of his vice presidential candidate, while making comments that can easily be construed as racism.

Posted by: Keuric | October 8, 2008 6:27 PM | Report abuse

OK, we have all used the “that one” reference sometime before. We are usually referring to one specific item among some class of items. For instance, that one cupcake, that one live crab, that one cream colored Lamborghini, that one person, that one liberal, that one elitist, that one person of color, and so on. Of course, context as well as historic language and gesture usage by the speaker tells us what the speaker likely meant by “that one.”

So I know what I prefer to believe John McCain meant, but I am concerned about what the available evidence suggests I should believe John McCain intended, based on the McCain campaign so far. Hmm, I think I will just forget about it; it’s not worth my time.

Then again, if John McCain did mean to display something mean and despicable by his use of “that one,” all I feel is sad, sad for John McCain who may be trapped in time, and the rest of us Americans who are trapped with angry dinosaurs running our country. Alternatively, if John McCain meant nothing mean or despicable by his use of “that one,” I feel hopeful, hopeful that John McCain will upgrade his speaking style before he goes on to interact with any colleagues or foreign dignitaries in the future, whether John McCain becomes our President or remains the Senator from Arizona.

Posted by: dmd208 | October 8, 2008 6:27 PM | Report abuse

Is it because he had the audacity to run for President at age 46?

----------------------------------------

Obama is 48, middle aged...

Posted by: celested9 | October 8, 2008 6:32 PM | Report abuse

Yeah, "that one". What McCain sounded like was the grumpy, failing old man he has beccme. He walked around in a mine field all night long and "that one" was the capper. "Bomb, bomb, bomb" Iran was another one that blew him off at the knees, and I wish I had a nickel for every time I heard, "my friends". What friends is this guy going to have when he is wiped out in November? None in the Senate, that's for sure. Maybe he should just retire now and take that beer industry lobbyist that his wife envisions for him. You know, "that one".

Posted by: pookiecat | October 8, 2008 6:52 PM | Report abuse

of more concern to me was the amount of times John McCain said "I Know How To"...he said it 12 times in relation to fixing something, my question is this, if McCain knows how to get America working again then why isn't he sharing this with us NOW? if he knows how to get Bin Laden then why hasn't he informed Bush? I'm very wary of a person who says "I know how to"...it sounds desperate and like he's trying to convince the rest of us.

Posted by: MrSmith1 | October 8, 2008 6:54 PM | Report abuse

Please read my blog on this very subject

http://talkingpointz.blogspot.com/

Posted by: sajak75 | October 8, 2008 7:11 PM | Report abuse

I am old enough to remember when "that one" was used by white people to denigrate people of color. Since John McCain is older than I am, I have to assume he is also familiar with the racial implications of this term--and if he isn't, that's an indication of how out of touch he really is. Since, like many Americans, I honor his service to our country, I am very disappointed that he and his campaign have chosen the low road of condescension and character assassination over the last few days--one reason that this old white woman will be voting for Obama.

Posted by: knlhamo | October 8, 2008 7:28 PM | Report abuse

I think it was deliberate from Mccain. I don't buy the "slip of tongue" theory. If you go back Mccain has "slipped his tongue" on more than one occasion. He has temperamental issues. He was increasingly getting frustrated.His attitude is very condescending. He comes across someone who is very sensitive and ready to explode any time. A bad character to have when you lead a country with so many issues.

Posted by: vkarthik | October 8, 2008 7:29 PM | Report abuse

Ms. Parker:
You seem so much less strident in your recent columns in support of conservative causes. Did the recent raking over the coals by your fellow conservative pundits for your column suggesting that Palin was unqualified for the VP position set your thinking somewhat askew? Maybe the realization that your IQ is some 50 points higher than the woman who would be VP or maybe evan "Queen" has got you smelling the coffe and not the purple kool aid you've been drinking with your conservative brethren.

Posted by: tniederberger | October 8, 2008 7:38 PM | Report abuse

let's sum up Obama's Chicago connections. His chief financial supporter was Tony Rezko, now on his way to federal prison. His spiritual advisor and mentor was the Rev. Jeremiah Wright, of "God damn America" fame. And the guy who got him his only administrative job and put him in charge of doling out $50 million is Ayers, a terrorist who was a domestic Osama bin Laden in his youth.

Even apart from the details of the Obama-Ayers connection, two key points emerge:

-- Obama lied and misled the American people in his description of his relationship with Ayers as casual and arm's length; and

-- Obama was consciously guided by Ayers' radical philosophy, rooted in the teachings of leftist Saul Alinksy, in his distribution of ACA grant funds.

Since Obama is asking us to let him direct education spending by the federal government and wants us to trust his veracity, these are difficulties he will have to explain in order to get the votes to win.

Now that Obama is comfortably ahead in the polls, attention will understandably shift to him. We will want to know what kind of president he would make. The fact that, within the past 10 years he participated in a radical program of political education conceptualized by an admitted radical terrorist offers no reassurance.

Why did Obama put up with Ayers? Because he got a big job and $50 million of patronage to distribute to his friends and supporters in Chicago. Why did he hang out with Wright? Because he was new in town, having grown up in Hawaii and Indonesia and having been educated at Columbia and Harvard, and needed all the local introductions he could get to jumpstart his political career. Why was he so close to Rezko? Because he funded Obama's campaigns and helped him buy a house for $300,000 less than he otherwise would have had to pay.

Not a good recommendation for a president.

Oh and I almost forgot...ACORN!

Posted by: blevins20061 | October 8, 2008 7:38 PM | Report abuse

The "that one" comment just shows that McCain has limited ability to think on his feet. He responds to issues viscerally, slinging his immediate (rash) thoughts this way and that, just like the hotdog pilot he was. The comment was only mildly disrespectful, but worse, it was undiplomatic. I wouldn't want him sitting across the table in sensitive diplomatic negotiations for our nation. His subsequent comment yesterday, "my fellow prisoners" really sums up his worldview.

Posted by: Tokyoite | October 8, 2008 7:48 PM | Report abuse

I have been surfing around this morning looking for comments about McCain's statement "That One." I was not particularly put off by this comment, as it struck me as innocuous reference to 'The One' in a joking way. But I have been thinking about all the comments I have read accusing John McCain of being racist for saying this phrase. And I have to wonder, is it any more or less controversial than Barack Obama's characterization of his white grandmother's reaction to black men on the street as that of a "typical white person." I found that comment way more telling and offensive than a lame attempt at humor, which John McCain freely admits on several past statements that he has done. Even owning up to the Bomb Bomb Bomb comment last night as a joke between himself and an old veteran was an honest response on his part.

I think they're even, and the desperate attempts to paint McCain as a racist is misguided. He's not a racist, no matter how much BO's people want him to be. BO, on the other hand . . . . . . . . .. .

Posted by: lawmom90 | October 8, 2008 8:08 PM | Report abuse

From:
Head of State
http://headofstate.blogspot.com/2008/10/that-one.html

Tuesday, October 07, 2008

"That One"

What a very odd thing for McCain to say.

McCain repeatedly invoked the need for a "steady hand on the tiller" tonight--for someone who will be calm and cool in the crises that the upcoming years will present us.

Yet this is a man who is utterly unable to contain his contempt--even on a night when, even as Bill Bennett says, he needed to "break through", and even when such a strange expression of disdain could only highlight pettiness, anger and partisanship that voters wish that candidates would steer away from in the greater interest of the nation.

McCain's fundamental position--one from which he finds his momentum and meaning--is so often one of a contemptuous anger for those who do not understand what he believes he has learned--e.g., "them".

This is the impulsive, gut-driven, black and white thinking that we have seen throughout the campaign.

We have had 8 years of a President driven by impulsive, black and white, gut-driven, categorical thinking. In those 8 years, from a position that manifested from the very start an angry, assumed knowledge, and a contempt for the position of others, we have now seen the results.

So this time: choose that one.

Cite:
Head of State
http://headofstate.blogspot.com/2008/10/that-one.html

Posted by: caraprado1 | October 8, 2008 8:29 PM | Report abuse

Come on people. Worrying about the comment
'That One' is just petty. We have more important things things like the economy and the banking crisis to worry about than that. I've been called far worse things and it didn't destroy me. If 'Any One' can't handle being called a name, I don't think the President is a position suited for them.

Posted by: Nihikeyah | October 8, 2008 8:32 PM | Report abuse

If Obama had made the same comment about McCaint - the web would have been crippled by the hateful responses. Obama '08

Posted by: glauver

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Are you kidding? Obama flipped off Hillary TWICE and the web seems to be just fine. Then and now.

Posted by: celested9 | October 8, 2008 8:53 PM | Report abuse

I don't know. It certainly was condescending as all hell. Like earlier in the night, he said something to the effect of "you've probably never heard of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac" to an African-American questioner.


Posted by: jaho | October 8, 2008 9:07 PM | Report abuse

Actually, there is probably nothing too sinister about McCain's use of "that one." However, McCain's attempt at being "cute" in what is supposed to be his best forum for his campaign allows McCain to come over as a court jester rather than as a candidate for President of the United States, the leader of the free world.

On another level, McCain does show a kind of disdain and disrespect for Obama. Historically, McCain resisted a national holiday for Martin Luther King. Perhaps there is an undercurrent of racism here. I have no real evidence except that as a white souterner who lived through "massive resistance" I feel that McCain has some negative feelings about people of color. His campaign is walking a very fine line here.

The most telling point of the debate actually came after the debate when the McCains left rather quickly while the Obama's lingered around interacting with the audience. I really think that this is quite a testimony as to which candidate really wants to help real people. To help people, you must engage them in conversation.

One of the questions that was asked in one of the Bush campaigns was, "Which candidate would you want to have a beer with?" In this campaign, one might ask, "Which candidate would you want to have a chat with?"

Posted by: EarlC | October 8, 2008 9:22 PM | Report abuse

Using "that one" does dehumanize Mr. Obama, but it's OK since he's some sort of robot anyway, right?

Posted by: SCMark | October 8, 2008 9:38 PM | Report abuse

Yes, the "That One" comment isn't worth much in the grand scheme, but it did catch my attention and I was wondering why I didn't hear or read more about it. It was condescending and disrespectful.
What I thought was laughable is McCain's comment about the presidency not being a place for OJT. Hello! Did he look at whom he chose to stand behind him, a heartbeat away? Ms OJT herself.

Posted by: InChargeToo | October 8, 2008 9:45 PM | Report abuse

Please RSVP. When exactly did McCain travel the high road. I must have missed that. You and some of your readers might consider the Daily Howler today re: McCain and the 2000 race specifically South Carolina. Offers some interesting narrative about Senator McCain.

mickster

Posted by: mickster1 | October 8, 2008 9:59 PM | Report abuse

"That one" is an old(50+ men will be familiar with the expression), "generational" expression. It is NOT derogatory, or dehumanizing. Freely translated means "That guy" and you use your thumb to point at "that one". No harm, no foul. You "kids" have to lighten up and not be so ready to be "offended".
By the way, I'm old and for Obama.

Posted by: caribootroutfitters | October 8, 2008 10:14 PM | Report abuse

It was disrespectful.

Posted by: martymar123 | October 8, 2008 10:25 PM | Report abuse

I say we rename Senator McCain 'Old Cranky Pants'.

Posted by: corridorg4 | October 8, 2008 10:27 PM | Report abuse

someone needs to clockwork orange ole' flyboy to reintroduce him to civil society.


top dog don't need to bark and growl.


mangey old mutt has himself on a long leash, going back to 'nam i'd say.


which war?

that one.

Posted by: forestbloggod | October 8, 2008 10:37 PM | Report abuse

DEBATE 1:
McCain didn't even once look at OBAMA.

DEBATE 2:
McCain calls OBAMA "That one."

This guy cannot stomach OBAMA. That's how I read it.
For a guy who goes on and on about "bi-partisan" stuff - it doesn't help that he is so repelled by the "other."

Posted by: chevychasedesigns | October 8, 2008 10:37 PM | Report abuse

I wonder if McCain meant to call Obama "the one", which is a conservative insult for Obama, but screwed it up?

At any rate, it was objectifying. He can't look at Obama and he can't address him and he can't think of him as a human being.

Posted by: agolembe | October 8, 2008 10:49 PM | Report abuse

I was on the fence, so to speak about who I was voting for. I wanted to watch all the debates. As it stands now, since last nights debate, I'm voting for Barack Obama. John McCain isn't the same person he was back in 2000. I see a very nasty man lately,childish actually. Add Sarah Palin to the mix, of really not hearing anything from McCain on the economy,health care or really anything, but insults to his opponent, I have to go with Obama. Palin scares me even more than John McCain does at this point. I can't seem to see her as a VP, never mind a possible President.

Posted by: JustMeD | October 9, 2008 12:19 AM | Report abuse

McCain comes across as lacking policies and fire power. He sounds being nasty and bitter. It is as if he anticipates defeat.

He has had every opportunity to put a compelling case to American Voters and he has failed. Hopefully, he will accept responsibility for his failed campaign and will not seek to blame Obama.

It was his decision to appoint Palin. She has come across as ill-equipped, dishonest, empty headed and vicious.

I cannot fathom why McCain made such a bad choice.

Posted by: robertjames1 | October 9, 2008 12:46 AM | Report abuse

I am 27, and this reminded me of something my grandfather would say, although he has never said that exactly. It just sounds condescending, and it was almost embarrassing for both of them.

Posted by: Moritasgus1 | October 9, 2008 1:50 AM | Report abuse

to the poster who claims that mccain cannot use a computer because of his war injuries, have you ever heard of steven hawking? he seems to have no problem communicating, LOL

Posted by: himself1 | October 9, 2008 2:41 AM | Report abuse

At least he didn't say, "That BOY!"

Posted by: DaytonOhio | October 9, 2008 7:38 AM | Report abuse

Oh hell you will all probably hate me for killing this line of postings but, so be it.

Wednesday night Larry King had Michelle Obama as his guest. Mrs. Obama was asked about the "that one" comment. I paraphrase her answer, no, I wasn't offended.

Now really, if Mrs. Obama is not offended I would suggest everybody get off their high horse and find a subject more worthy of discussion.

Posted by: Thatsnuts | October 9, 2008 7:53 AM | Report abuse

So, may I point out that it's clear this
WAPO OBAMA Shill Phony Baloney Vile Ill
Tempered Witch Katleen Parker is Stuck On
Stupid as every day all Parker seems even
capable to endless attacks on both Gov
Sarah Palin and Sen John McCain now then?

So does WAPO or the DNC or Barack Obama
pay Parker by word to do her endless idiotic attacks? Parker is the least talented female writer at WAPO and the
absolutely Most Boring And Stupid!

Posted by: Ralphinphnx | October 9, 2008 9:11 AM | Report abuse

Just another glowing example of Mr. McCains bad temperment and mental immaturity. Bush redux.

Posted by: notfooledbydistractions | October 9, 2008 9:25 AM | Report abuse

Let's talk about the shameless things that "that one" has done against McCain. We'll start with the ad that makes fun of McCain for not being able to use a computer...even knowing full well that McCain cannot use the computer for prolonged amounts of time because of his injuries when he was a POW in Vietnam. Yes, let's talk about disrespect!

Posted by: AJD-PA | October 8, 2008 12:48 PM

---

Oh, yeah, that's so much worse than your opponent trying to paint you as a terrorist. Yeah, I see it now.

Thanks for the laugh.

Posted by: notfooledbydistractions | October 9, 2008 9:28 AM | Report abuse

I wonder if, when Cindy and John have disagreements, if John says to his kids, "that c*** did such and such"? I think it was not racist, but showing total disdain and respect for Obama. Many times during the primary season, McCain spoke just as nastily about and to Romney. I was surprised that Romney even spoke to him after the campaign. John McCain is just a nasty person.He claims that he can't use his arms very well, but he used them well enough in the cloak room of the Senate to physically attack the Republican Senator from Iowa, Senator Charles Grassley. He Clearly does not have the tmeperament and stability to be president. It shows in his ideas and stunts. One day he says the economy is strong and the next day we've got a crisis. One day he's suspending his campaign and he's not going to debate until the crisis is over and the next day he is at the debate and there was no progress at solving the crisis. He's right about one thing. We need a steady hand at the tiller, and he aint it.

Posted by: majorteddy | October 9, 2008 10:31 AM | Report abuse

Using the phrase “that one” dishonorable and disrespectful. The McCain campaign has sacrificed issues for sound bites, character attacks and innuendo. A President and Vice President must always maintain our values, and the dignity of the office. We have not witnessed this in the last eight years and if recent events are a prelude, we will not see it again, if McCain is elected. We are at a dangerous crossroad in history and the world is in need of dignity, honor, patience, leadership, respect and intelligence. The McCain of 2000 showed these traits. The McCain Palin team abandoned them to get elected.

Posted by: MyVoice3 | October 9, 2008 11:13 AM | Report abuse

The "that one" comment seemed unremarkable to me at the time, and I was amazed that it generated any comment at all, let alone the apparent firestorm of criticism. Until I saw the reaction, the only thing I thought McCain might have been guilty of was trying too hard to be hip or trendy. Maybe I'm the only one who has noticed, but it has become more common to hear "that one," or its close relatives "this one" or "the other one," used to refer to another person in popular culture. At least it seems pretty common in TV shows, sometimes used when the speaker is annoyed (Frank Barone referring to Marie as "that one" or "this one" in "Everybody Loves Raymond" comes immediately to mind), sometimes when it is obviously not meant negatively(again, from "Raymond," when Ray calls one of his kids "the other one" when he has that mind block that all parents get when they temporarily can't recall a child's name), and other times for no apparent reason other than to sound contemporary. Lately I've noticed it trickling into everyday use in conversations among friends, and I've even heard the phrase "this one" in wedding toasts--and never thought it was an offensive way to objectify someone. Here's an SNL clip where Tina Fey refers to Amy Poehler as "this one," and I defy anyone to claim that she is being disrespectful or trying dehumanize Poehler: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kjFIlLSRGnw
I don't know whether my outrage antenna is out of tune, or if others' antennae are too finely tuned, but either way it was a big surprise to me when "that one" became such a big deal.

Posted by: what_cheer_wombat | October 9, 2008 11:43 AM | Report abuse

Ooops!! I just realized that in my previous post I referred to my self as "the only one" instead of "the only man" or "the only person." Perhaps I have inadvertently objectified and dehumanized myself, and if so, I apologize to myself.

Posted by: what_cheer_wombat | October 9, 2008 11:47 AM | Report abuse

McCain's "That one!" moment simply illustrated that he is unprofessional, contemptuous, and probably mentally unbalanced. Was anyone really surprised. Obama didn't seemed surprised. McCain is making George Bush look like a statesman.

Posted by: maxfli68 | October 9, 2008 3:29 PM | Report abuse

Joe Biden pased that phrase very well the next morning: When John McCain is behaving badly, as for instance getting personal, or getting into untruths and nasty politics, he won't look at the person he is talking to and tends to use phrases like "That One".

John knows, perhaps only vaguely, that his campaign has been hijacked by Republican Professionals. He isn't running his campaign any more, and so is falling into his compensating behavior.

John may be the candidate, but Rove and company are doing the campaigning. George's people are now thoroughly in charge, and intend to remain in charge for as long as they can.

20 January, 2009, they stop being in charge. It would be nice if at that point they started being in jail.

Posted by: ceflynline | October 9, 2008 3:39 PM | Report abuse

Although John McCain is not my candidate of choice, I have always had a certain amount of respect for him. His service to our country, his willingness to appear before groups that are not necessarily his target audience, e.g. the Urban League, and his denouncemet of the "win at any costs" way of doing things in the political arena. What made this election special for me was that we had quality candidates all around. Sad to say, I no longer feel this way. I believe his choice of Sarah Palin started the runaway train on its downward descent.

Posted by: justme13 | October 9, 2008 5:22 PM | Report abuse


Here's Palin today with Ingrahm:

""Some in the mainstream media are saying that well we're taking the gloves off unfairly. No. You know there are only, what, 26 days to go. We gotta start getting answers to these questions that are paramount here so that voters have a choice in front of them that is based on truthfulness and candor. They deserve it."

The Alaska governor told Ingraham's listeners that if those questions were being answered, voters would find Obama "out of the mainstream," adding that the Illinois senator would diminish "the prestige of the United States presidency.""

McCain was treated this way for having an adopted daughter darker than himself. Now Palin is dropping the code: a black ivy league senator who served in his state's legislature would diminish the prestige of the United States presidency.

Where's the FBI and Homeland Security on the threats at McCain events, and on Tod Palin's association with terrorist Vogler?

Posted by: practica1 | October 9, 2008 5:27 PM | Report abuse

Likely it was a reference to "'The One'you have been waiting for;" uttered by Obama himself about himself.

Posted by: Kansas28 | October 10, 2008 1:32 AM | Report abuse

It is very unfortunate for all of us at this time....in time.
The big picture of current events shows us that the Earth is rapidly deteriorating, the world's financial markets are on a steady downward spiral into unchartered territory due to voracious greed. Our, otherwise peaceful and compassionate country has been lead into not one,not two, but three regional conflicts, by a treasonously myopic, unimaginative, and blatantly deceptive and manipulative self-serving, rogue administration. An administration that was planning and preying for war before the ink on the lease to the White House dried. The Great Depression and Pearl Harbor were both devastating and life altering events which are used as milestone markers in how the ways of life changed for our grandparents.
The acidic and petulant tone and atmosphere of this election is reflective of the underlying social tensions, cultural hatred, political jealously, and ethnic animosity, that Lincoln warns us about with, "A house divide against itself cannot stand".
What we are all seeing here is an anemic display of the very worst of what the Repelican Party has to offer, at its very best. What we have is the unfiltered dregs from the bottom of the barrel, tying desperately to use every trick in the Bush/ Cheney/ Rove political play book, which is fear, propaganda, and intimidation to gain votes because they have nothing new, substantial, or practical to cure our current "perfect crisis".
McCain's selection of Palin as a VP candidate is not only absurd,
but is insulting to every American above ground, and probably to a few underground.
McCain's justification for the continued and intentional distortion of Obama's relationship with Ayers, claiming Obama kicked off his political life in Ayers' living room. This is an example of every body has a history of skeletons in the closet but him. It also illustrates his lack of true vision. McCain claims that character and honesty count ...in Washington. What about McCain's character and honesty? Where did he start his political career, selling girl scout cookies? In the 1980's he was groomed by the Reagan White House as Chair to a special legislative council, which oversaw funding for a store front PAC that funneled illegal money for the Iran Contra affair, which had a serious reputation for torture, kidnapping, political assassination, and Sandinista Death Squad. The Iranian counter action was that the over flow of illegal weapons sold to Iran and used against Iraq, were sold to and used by the Taliban fighters of Northern Afghanistan against the invading Soviet Army.
In the 90s, during his second marriage, he was very close to Charles Keating and the largest massive financial bail out of a banking system in history. The largest bail out that is until the financial crisis that rolled down from the Colorado Rockies, which was initiated, in part, by Jeb Bush, the unknown, unspoken of brother of our current President.
I am sure there are more issues regarding McCain's character, as well as Palin's that will render them both less truthful and less electable than Bush would be, if, thank god he's not, he were eligible for a third term.


Posted by: appelshock | October 10, 2008 1:33 AM | Report abuse

Dear Kathleen:
For one splitting moment, let us zero-in on “that one” moment in time -the second debate between the two protagonists - which may have contributed to the slip of the tongue on Mr. John McCain’s part. It is generally agreed that both Barack and John had a wealth of earth moving ideas with regard to the way forward for America. At a time when the state of the economy has taken center stage, a keen observer would think it was time for the presidential candidates to take advantage of the opportunity by articulating policies,on the spur of the moment, that would salvage the nation. That chance, I am afraid, was squandered... Perhaps it was in the format, or the arguably "repressive" rules, moderated by Tom Brokaw, that contributed to and could not allow the freedom for either candidate to ad lib their train of thought with specificity on the current troubling issue(s) e.g the ramifications of the financial meltdown at Wall Street. Mr.John McCain came close though, when he referred Mr.Barack Obama as "That One"-the subject of this article- but, I am sure you will also agree - as you seem to suggest - the connotation of it seemed distasteful and condescending when he could otherwise been addressed graciously.Still, ones sense of judgment is brought to question on matters to do with social perception.
Cheers,
David Wafula Nerubucha

Posted by: david_wafula | October 10, 2008 5:53 AM | Report abuse

McCain's "that one" comment was an admission of frustration with an opponent he couldn't lay a glove on. It was foolish, but hardly racist. Those Obamaphiles who make that charge at every opportunity seem to want ill will to continue in perpetuity. They are the real reason Obama's majority isn't as big as it should be.

Posted by: rmpatera | October 10, 2008 6:56 AM | Report abuse

Please, who cares, only dems would make a big deal out of this, if Obama had said it to McCain repubs wouldnt....and dont care, get over it and talk about the issues, but thats not whats important obviously because people are voting w/their emotions this year and not their brains, because they have been geared to believe this is the repubs fault, ignorance kills, its everyones fault, including ours!!! People need to start being responsible and accountable.

Posted by: egibson888 | October 10, 2008 8:20 AM | Report abuse

Regardless of how one interprets the racial sensitivity of the comment, it's also just plain disrespectful. John McCain is a Senator, and one of his fellow Senators is Barack Obama. "Senator Obama" is the correct way to address Barack Obama, not "that one." It's a level of respect due to an official in that position, and one that McCain tried to deny for cheap points. I hope it does not work out for him in the long run.

Posted by: mredder4 | October 10, 2008 8:39 AM | Report abuse

Ahhhhh - these blogs are so utterly amusing! I noticed that all the conservatives/Republicans really don't think that McCain referring to Obama as "that one" is such a big deal - and that we "should stick to the issues." How laughable. Which current issues are they sticking to through out this campaign season? Palin is out on the stump lying through her teeth about everything she knows (which isn't much) and fudging the rest. For example: "He has so much disregard for our great country, he thinks it's ok to pal around with terrorists." (all refuted by factcheck.org) This is being said by the running mate of the candidate who thinks bringing up the Keating Five amounts to dirty politics. Give me a break! McPalin is the definition of hypocritical.

Posted by: blondie92655 | October 10, 2008 9:23 AM | Report abuse

What a waste of ink. McCain was obviously talking about an event that had a different outcome than what one would assume at first glance. The expression "that one" goes with "this one" as in "not that one", but "this one". Once again, it is because of the contrast between what is expected and what is reality. McCain simply referenced Sen. Obama first and said "that one" and then changed "this one" to me. That didn't change his intent of simply contrasting between what was expected and what was not expected. That was just how the final words came out. If he had said "you know who voted for it, etc, 'this one', and you know who voted against it Sen. Obama," it would have all been the same but come out different and in a different order. Writing about this like it has some "meaing" is totally silly and shows the writers lack of understanding of what was being discussed and it's context.

Posted by: ibatiger | October 10, 2008 9:29 AM | Report abuse

I am a liberal and a democrat. But, I want the president of my country to be selected based on merits, and not by an overwhelming bias, and propaganda. I don't understand why the media (almost all of them) and liberal-leaning papers like WP, NY Times, LA Times, Boston Globe, etc jump all over, when William Ayers or Tony Rezko's connections with Barack Obama is discussed. After all, if Obama does not have anything to worry, is it not welcome that this thing comes out in the open. Should Obama be protected from any criticism? Didn't the media push us into the Iraq War? They failed us once, and fail us again. In 2000 election, it was painful for me to see the media glowing over Bush as the savior of White House's "integrity" and "morality". We know what we got. Now, it is the media's turn to brainwash everyone into believing Obama has done nothing wrong, and will do none. Please don't push your agenda on us. If there is a story about Obama and Ayers, investigate it, explain it. Don't attack those who bring it in the open. In fact, before Palin talked about it or Clinton brought it, the media should have done that. We don't believe in Hannity. We want YOU to do it for us. Ask Obama why he associated with Ayers, Wright, and Rezko so long and in so much depth. Let the world know what he has to say. Don't push Obama into the White House. Let him earn it. We deserve that, and you (the news media) need to earn that respect, by asking tough questions to Obama too. Don't be a propaganda machine for any party or any candidate. The reason I am a Democrat is because of the dislike I have for right-wing loud mouths. We don't need left-wing cover-up machines. If you believe Obama is good, he'll come out clean. BUT DON'T COVER IT UP.

Posted by: ronniesmith123 | October 10, 2008 2:58 PM | Report abuse

John McCain is an idiot - that comment was disrespectful and Obama?Biden will win. I'm sick of his dirty tactics - we know he's a liar!!

Posted by: marcymaxx | October 10, 2008 3:02 PM | Report abuse

Democrats for John McCain and Sarah Palin in 2008

Posted by: hclark1 | October 10, 2008 3:53 PM | Report abuse

ronniesmith123...
Cool. But lets be fair about this shall we? Can the media at the SAME TIME question Palin and her secessionist DAILY by showing her NOT a perception, but HER on video, can we get DAILY updates to remind us of her abuse of authority as governor, can we get the OTHER STORY DAILY behind McCains heroism that was more like traitorism, can we get more DAILY video of how he treated the family members of MIA/POW of Vietnam and the Korean war, DAILY video of Keating 5, DAILY video pointing out the sexism during the RNC and how Palin is being used as nothing more than a supposed sex object, etc.... I mean if we want to be fair about it all. Right?

Posted by: bbg_isback | October 10, 2008 4:18 PM | Report abuse

There is no doubt that what you are seeing now is the "real" John McCain. Examples of his behavior are profound. Right now he is having to deal with this career ending election defeat and he's having great difficulty responding to the long odds and many problems his campaign is facing, most of which are self inflected. These problems that were always there for him but now however 80 million people are witnessing his weaknesses – many for the first time. Call in the dogs, put out the fires, the hunt’s over. And it isn’t going to start again.

Posted by: BarryOR | October 10, 2008 6:33 PM | Report abuse

My understanding is that the McCain family is originally from the Carolinas. So he should know better than to use a term such as "that one". I hate to think it of the man, but there is no way that his use of the term was not implicitly racist.

Posted by: adevice | October 10, 2008 10:32 PM | Report abuse

English is not my first language but I was taught that: I use "this when it is closer to me and "that" if it is farther. I learned that "one" is singular. However, it has been a tradition to use "that one" as endearment or can be used teasingly.

Posted by: statistician | October 11, 2008 2:25 AM | Report abuse

Why are we not focusing on fraud, impersonation, cheating on elections and registration? Where is CNN day to day, panel to panel please make the issue BIG!!

Posted by: statistician | October 11, 2008 2:29 AM | Report abuse

I don't think it was especially racist but reflects McCain's condescending disrespect for anyone or anything different. McCain is a product of his generation who are above saying "please" or "thank you" to waiters. Once again, it shows the man does not have the respect, humility, integrity or connection to the present to be President

Posted by: coloradodog | October 11, 2008 7:19 AM | Report abuse

twe; So, Obama is appointed to a comission with Ayers. a man who was never convicted, not indicted and is now a respected educator. That makes Obama a terrorist? When Ayers was a member of the Weathermen Obama was 8 years old. How does that make him a terrorist?

Sarah Palins husband Todd "First Dude" belonged to the Alaska Independence Party up until 2002; Sarah has given speeches for this party (it's on Video) even in early 2008. The party says it is for Alaska First and that they are Alaskans - not Americans. They are willing to take American money - but want to be a separate nation. (By your reasoning, now would that make Sarah's hubby and anti-American sympathizer?)

Your most telling statement was "I don't want a President who ....is biracial."

Posted by: gjkbear | October 11, 2008 11:21 AM | Report abuse

One Brother Against My America.

You’ve been looking for change, my friend? Why, you’re “American”, aren’t you? Then you already know all about change, and that’s your greatest strength. You anticipate it, prepare for it, deal with it. Hard. Straight. You know just how to use that change to make this great land of ours even greater. Ingenuity. That’s it, Mac. Ingenuity. Be a “Maverick”! You can’t get any more “American” than that, can you? You can’t buy it, you can’t elect it. You have to BE it. Yes, Sir-ree, just “Be American”!

But like it or not, times may be a-changin’. For the first time in my adult life, I’m not proud of what this country might become.

Let me tell you a little story. Fast-forward to 2009. The Obama Administration is in full-swing. What about your father, brothers, sons, and friends, who sacrificed life and limb to preserve and protect the freedom and democracy that we, as “Americans”, used to hold so dear to our hearts? What happened to their memory, you ask? Well, that’s all changed, now. Yes, my friend, you can find their names on the “Wall of Mistakes”, erected by the new OBAMA Administration. Right there on the Capitol Mall, towering over all those gardens that used to be one or another “War Memorial”. Those Memorials, you ask? They’re long gone, replaced by beautiful trees and flowers, shaded by the great, great new “Wall”. After all, no sense in remembering what was so wrong about our country, is there? No, after admitting our mistakes to the rest of the world, the only thing left to do was to plaster them on that great big “Wall of Mistakes”, for everyone to see, so that we never forget that we are not the greatest country in the world. How did we ever come to think we were so “special” anyway?

What about all those countries we liberated, and all those other, evil ones still posing a national risk, you ask? Shhhh!! Don’t let anyone hear you talk such nonsense. We have no “Enemies”. We don’t need any military power. We’re just like everyone else in the world. No better, no worse. We don’t need to lose our blood fighting for the freedom of other people in the world. Democracy is overrated, anyway. No, we just need to stop being so proud-foolish! Now if that ain’t change, I don’t know what is!

You ask about hard work? No, that notion is long gone! No one is supposed to out-do their neighbor. At best, that might be considered “impolite”. At worst, they’ll call you a “racist”. Don’t go there! Just do what everyone else does, no more, no less. Don’t try to be a hero, or a soldier, or, oh, my goodness gracious, a “Maverick”! No, Sir-ree, there’s no room for any “Mavericks” in this land. In fact, I don’t know if we even are a country anymore. After all, our leader, Mr. OBAMA, sits on the board of the “Foundation for the Redistribution of All Unused Deeds”. We want to make sure the goodness of every deed is shared by all the people of this world, not just those we used to call “Americans”. No, Sir-ree, we don’t want to be gluttons when it comes to all the fruits of our labor. Gosh! What a bunch of Capitalistic Pigs we used to be! No, not in this Administration of Change. Just do the minimum required, and make sure there is no excess to fight over. What a senseless waste that would be!

No, we’ve got it right now. No wars, no greed, no enemies. You ask about “Pride”? Funny, I don’t recall that one. Is it something we used to know about? Something we used to feel? Oh, heck, I just can’t place it! Pride! Huh! It must have cost a lot, because we don’t have any room for anything like that in this new land. It’s not in our budget. OBAMA has made damn sure of that!

So, sleep well, good Buddy! Oh, and sleep is much easier now, because you don’t even have to dream! Boy, was that a weight off of my shoulders, not having to dream anymore. My dreams kept bothering me. They kept making me think I wasn’t doing something right. They kept telling me to do something different. Now I know. I don’t need to dream. The government is doing all the dreaming for us, now. Leaving us alone to sleep. And, man-oh-man, am I tired. I might as well roll off to sleep now. There’s nothing else for me to do anyway. Just sleep, and get my three government squares a day. I don’t even have to be bothered looking forward to anything anymore. Is this “Easy Street” or what? Sleep well, my friend. Sleep well!

Posted by: CMcK-Troiano | October 11, 2008 4:30 PM | Report abuse

Barack Obama's Involvement with ACORN Unearthed, Missing
Cleveland Leader ^ | October 9, 2008 - 9:08pm.

While Barack Obama's connection with the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now (ACORN) has not gone entirely unreported, it has not been fully explained. Most media background pieces simply note Obama's involvement in a 1995 lawsuit on behalf of ACORN. Obama's own website, as well as most major media, fail to reveal the full depth and extent of his relationship with the organization.

Attempts to hide evidence of Obama's involvement with ACORN have included wiping the web clean of potentially damaging articles that had appeared, and were previously publicly accessible. Unfortunately, those behind the attempted cover-up failed to realize that in today's day and age, nothing disappears forever. There also exists another layer of the web, the hidden web, which is full of information included in proprietary scholarly databases where these very same "missing" articles can be easily uncovered.

Obama's campaign website states:

Fact: Barack was never an ACORN trainer and never worked for ACORN in any other capacity.

Is that really a FACT, or just another lie? Let's take a look at a quote from a 2004 article - Case Study: Chicago- The Barack Obama Campaign - written by Toni Foulkes, a Chicago ACORN Leader, which was published in the journal Social Policy. Did we mention that Social Policy recently pulled this particular article from their website, while leaving links to all other articles up?

"Obama took the case, known as ACORN vs. Edgar (the name of the Republican governor at the time) and we won. Obama then went on to run a voter registration project with Project VOTE in 1992 that made it possible for Carol Moseley Braun to win the Senate that year. Project VOTE delivered 50,000 newly registered voters in that campaign (ACORN delivered about 5,000 of them).

Since then, we have invited Obama to our leadership training sessions to run the session on power every year, and, as a result, many of our newly developing leaders got to know him before he ever ran for office. Thus it was natural for many of us to be active volunteers in his first campaign for STate Senate and then his failed bid for U.S. Congress in 1996. By the time he ran for U.S. Senate, we were old friends."

Not only does Foulkes boast of Obama's ACORN leadership training, but also makes it clear that Obama's post-law school organizing of "Project VOTE" in 1992 was undertaken in direct partnership with ACORN. The tie between Project VOTE and ACORN is also something that Obama and others have attempted to disprove in recent weeks as ACORN has come under fire for allegations of voter registration fraud.

As recently as March 2008, the Los Angeles Times also made reference to Barack Obama's involvement with ACORN:

"At the time, Talbot worked at the social action group ACORN and initially considered Obama a competitor. But she became so impressed with his work that she invited him to help train her staff." (LA Times, March 2, 2008)

All this information was easily pulled up with minimal time investment. It took less than thirty minutes to find, despite attempts by some to bury the truth. If I could find this with little effort, imagine what could be dug up with a serious, in-depth investigation. Scary, isn't it?

Nevertheless, Barack Obama's campaign website continues to lie and deny the truth about his involvement and association with ACORN. No matter how many times you say it, it does not make it true. The facts do not lie, Senator Obama. It's time to come clean and tell the truth, and it's time for the American people to demand it.

Posted by: 4elise | October 12, 2008 11:19 AM | Report abuse

" That one...." Oh that's just square old McCain thinking he's being hip and cute. Just a word fart.
Though, I suppose it was meant in some measure to say `Obama's not to be taken seriously.'
No big deal,IMHO

Posted by: jmf3210 | October 13, 2008 3:17 PM | Report abuse

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