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Not exactly celebration time for the GOP in Post poll of Massachusetts voters

Republican giddiness over the election of Scott Brown to the senate seat held for 46 years by the late Sen. Ted Kennedy (D) is understandable. But a poll released over the weekend is more evidence that the GOP is over-interpreting the meaning of the "Massachusetts Massacre."

The contention that the vote was a referendum on President Obama doesn't hold up. According to the poll, conducted by The Post, the Kaiser Family Foundation and Harvard University, "52 percent of Brown voters said Obama was not a factor."

The survey also showed that voters want Brown to work with Democrats. "Three-quarters of those who voted for Brown say they would like him to work with Democrats to get Republican ideas into legislation in general," The Post reported Saturday; "nearly half say so specifically about health-care legislation." That would require Republicans to move beyond saying, "No." Something that doesn't appear likely, despite Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnel's assertions on "Meet The Press."

And here's the biggest caution of all for the Republicans: the voters don't much like their policies, such as they are. "GOP policies prove even less popular," the story noted, "with 58 percent of Massachusetts voters saying they are dissatisfied or angry about what Republicans in Congress are offering."

The anger of the electorate was unleashed in the elections of 2006, 2008, 2009 and the Massachusetts special election. They don't like the direction of the country and they want real solutions. Republicans will actually have to come up with some if they want to capitalize on that bipartisan anger.

By Jonathan Capehart  | January 25, 2010; 8:26 AM ET
Categories:  Capehart  | Tags:  Jonathan Capehart  
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Comments

Something tells me you can't name two Republican proposals pertaining to healthcare reform.

Posted by: pcannady | January 25, 2010 11:44 AM | Report abuse

I am one of the independent voters in Massachusetts. I didn’t agree with all of Brown’s positions on the issues, nor did I agree with all of Coakley’s. I was prepared to vote for Coakley earlier in the campaign, but then changed my vote to Brown for three reasons.

First, Coakley turned to EXTREME negative campaigning against Brown instead of focusing on her positions, accomplishments and what she will do in the job. How a person runs a campaign is a very good indicator of a person’s true character and depth, or lack thereof. Brown took the high road and for the most part kept to what he stands for.
Second, while I do support health care reform, the current form of the legislation and the manner it was produced is a disservice to the American people. Brown got it right when he said “we can do better”.
Third, and most important, the divisiveness between the two parties in Washington and the poor performance in legislating is abysmal. Brown, when compared to Coakley, showed more of an inclination to work with others in the congress, regardless of party, in order to move legislations forward, and not just tow the party line. For me, this is the most important point in this election, and Mr. Brown’s performance will be judged both on what he accomplishes, and how he does it. I hope my vote was the right one, time will tell and we all will be watching.

Posted by: bhjnk | January 25, 2010 11:49 AM | Report abuse

Something tells me you can't name two Republican proposals pertaining to healthcare reform.

How about:

across state line shopping for health care plans

putting a cap on malpractice insurance lawsuits

Posted by: SECFan | January 25, 2010 11:56 AM | Report abuse

you carry water, you toe the line.

Posted by: AHappyWarrior | January 25, 2010 12:04 PM | Report abuse

BHJNK- whatever your motives for voting for Brown were, you did this country no service. You have given months worth of fodder for Fox news. I will eat my hat if Brown proves to be anything other than another do nothing Republican.

Posted by: kriszti1967 | January 25, 2010 12:15 PM | Report abuse

"52 percent of Brown voters said Obama was not a factor."
"with 58 percent of Massachusetts voters saying they are dissatisfied or angry about what Republicans in Congress are offering."

And what percent said it's important to have a senator who'll shake hands with Red Sox fans outside of Fenway Park? We all know that's the real reason Brown beat Coakley. Well, that and the nude photo.

Posted by: scottilla | January 25, 2010 12:35 PM | Report abuse

Post Election comments are somewhat foolish, it reminds one of John Kerry, I Voted for it before I voted against it. Not one individual in this country agrees with all the proposals of these politiicans, but when the President of the United States rushes to MA to rescue the campaign of a follower, and the follower fails, it reflects on the President, especially when it is just an empty suit, depending on others to develop policies, enact legislation. HR 3951 calls for the reduction of reimbursement to Doctors serving Medicare and Tricare patients by 21% effective February 28, 2010. Name a single politician adressing this disaster! What has the President said about this?

Posted by: weidenhof4 | January 25, 2010 1:01 PM | Report abuse

bhjnk's comments demonstrate the muddled thinking and superficial analysis that "independent" voters used to elect Scott Brown.

Scott Brown ran away from his party, didn't even identify himself as Republican, and ran against the healthcare bill event though it's much like the bill he voted FOR in his own state. That's the "high road"?

bhjnk preferred Brown because he said "we can do better"? That's an ingenious, detailed and well considered policy prescription isn't it? I wonder how much study and hard work was invested in developing that position? And has there ever been a politician dead or alive who thought something couldn't be done better?

Voters like bhjnk have done the entire nation a disservice by letting their emotions get the better of them, and by letting themselves be bamboozled by Fox News' relentless negativism and the Tea Party crowd's easily manipulated anger.

Posted by: sambam | January 25, 2010 2:24 PM | Report abuse

SECFan posted January 25, 2010 11:56 AM
“Something tells me you can't name two Republican proposals pertaining to healthcare reform.
How about:
across state line shopping for health care plans
putting a cap on malpractice insurance lawsuits”

Name one state where tort reform has passed and health care costs are more affordable … there are none. There is no incentive for insurance companies to lower rates when doctors can pass the cost on to consumers and doctors (AMA) are unwilling to get rid of their quacks.

What is with crossing state line to shop for health care?
Why would a coal miner in WV expect lower rates if he could buy health insurance in Arizona?

scottilla posted January 25, 2010 12:35 PM
“And what percent said it's important to have a senator who'll shake hands with Red Sox fans outside of Fenway Park? We all know that's the real reason Brown beat Coakley. Well, that and the nude photo.”

WOW if Mass voters voted against Coakley for either of the two reasons you mention the country is doomed to stupidity.

"with 58 percent of Massachusetts voters saying they are dissatisfied or angry about what Republicans in Congress are offering."

I wonder if republicans realize they now own health care. Scott Brown will be expected to lead the way.


Posted by: knjincvc | January 25, 2010 2:40 PM | Report abuse

I trust polls just about as much as I trust the Congress...and that just isn't very much at all.

Posted by: staterighter | January 25, 2010 3:16 PM | Report abuse

Scott Brown was not elected to carry the GOP's water..if he does, he will be booted out very quickly in 2012. Remember, he voted for Mass's universal healthcare.

Posted by: jjj141 | January 25, 2010 4:07 PM | Report abuse

2 + 2 =5 or at least it does when the Democrats try to spin the election results. For instance this statement "And here's the biggest caution of all for the Republicans: the voters don't much like their policies, such as they are. "GOP policies prove even less popular,"

Really??? Are you sure about that?? Lets see in liberal Mass you have a cadidate running on just about everything opposite of Obama's agenda, i.e. Republican principles, and he wins the election, and you say this proves Gop policies are even less popular???!!!??? How's that again???
That one is as good as Obama claiming the voters are so mad at Bush, that they went ahead and elected a Republican to prove it. Swamp land in Florida anyone?

Posted by: JGates1 | January 25, 2010 7:50 PM | Report abuse

"58 percent of Massachusetts voters saying they are dissatisfied or angry about what Republicans in Congress are offering."

They picked a strange way of showing it.

BHJNK: You fell for the "we can do better" line? You know what they say about the road to hell.

Agree with commenters kriszti & sambam and I don't think your vote was "the right one" BHJNK---but if it lights a fire under the Dems, then I will thank you.

Posted by: martymar123 | January 25, 2010 8:56 PM | Report abuse

Something happens to people when they come to Washington. It's something like what happens with street gangs. No matter if an individual street gang member could potentially be reasoned with, as an individual. Once they get together with the gang, the worst behavior tends to set the agenda for the gang. Something like this seems to happen when seemingly reasonable people like Senator-elect Brown or President-elect George W Bush come to Washington. No matter how moderately they behaved at the state level, they seem to morph into political extremists of either the right or the left when they come to Washington.

Posted by: ripvanwinkleincollege | January 25, 2010 9:18 PM | Report abuse

It is good to see there are others who are angry at the Republican's refusnik obstructionism but who can also see their M.O. They push the fear buttons of their mostly poorer, right wing base (this from the party friendly to big business and wealth) knowing it sets off extremist reactions which of course draws the attention of the craven media who then hype it to sell newspapers and advertising. It is a profoundly cynical strategy that truly is a danger to the country.

Posted by: averagejane3 | January 27, 2010 12:15 AM | Report abuse

Focus on the Family
Should stand for Focus on the F Ups

Posted by: lildg54 | January 27, 2010 11:31 AM | Report abuse

Something tells me you can't name two Republican proposals pertaining to healthcare reform.

Posted by: pcannady | January 25, 2010 11:44 AM | Report abuse

True words indeed
How about all the elected officials get healthcare like the rest of us then we will get healthcare reform

Posted by: lildg54 | January 27, 2010 11:39 AM | Report abuse

Scott Brown was not elected to carry the GOP's water..if he does, he will be booted out very quickly in 2012. Remember, he voted for Mass's universal healthcare.

Posted by: jjj141 | January 25, 2010 4:07 PM | Report abuse

True indeed but remember Republicons have tunnelvision and see the world through their own eyes warped as they may be.

Posted by: lildg54 | January 27, 2010 12:35 PM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
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