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'Snowmageddon' was bad, but don't pretend it was a blizzard

Since the first snowflake dropped on Friday afternoon, I’ve been biting my tongue. I’m from upstate New York -- Albany and Buffalo, to be specific -- and I know we can be a tiresome lot when it comes to winter weather. “You think THIS is bad?!” is about last thing people not accustomed to snow want to hear when they are digging out. And, unlike my snow superior husband, I try to cut some slack for Washington drivers who don’t know the tricks of pumping your brakes or steering into the swerve.

Nonetheless, I can’t keep quiet any longer about the abandon with which the word “blizzard” is being tossed around. "Paralyzed by blizzard" screamed the news. Near-record amounts of snow was dumped on the Washington area, but whether it qualified as a blizzard is another question entirely. According to the National Weather Service, certain conditions must exist before a storm can be labeled a blizzard. There must be sustained wind or frequent gusts to 35 miles an hour or greater and such falling or blowing snow that visibility is reduced to less than a quarter mile. Moreover, these conditions must prevail for a minimum of three hours. A spokesman for the weather service told me today that it has yet to determine whether those conditions were met.

My betting is that as bad as people thought the so-called “snowmaggdeon” was, it wasn’t really a blizzard. And here I have no choice but to be tiresome and tell some war stories. I lived through Buffalo’s Blizzard of 1977 (houses literally buried in snow, winds gusting to 69 mph, thousands of cars abandoned, people stranded, bone chilling cold), and that experience gave me an appreciation of what a true blizzard is. Indeed, the best definition of a blizzard comes not from the National Weather Service but from my colleague and fellow Buffalonian Tom Toles: “It is really scary. You can't see a thing -- and you think you are going to die.”

So, when I saw people in the Washington region over the weekend building snowmen, having communal snowball fights and otherwise frolicking, I couldn’t help myself: "You think THIS is bad?!”

By Jo-Ann Armao  | February 9, 2010; 2:48 PM ET
Categories:  Armao  | Tags:  Jo-Ann Armao  
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Comments

I actually died in a real blizzard. Judging by the fact that I am still alive, this must not have been a blizzard.

Posted by: Wallenstein | February 9, 2010 3:09 PM | Report abuse

There are drifts 3' high in my yard. It took me 8 hours to dig out my cars, both of which were hit by snowplows. If it's so easy for your upstate New Yorkers to deal with, come over to Silver Spring and bring your shovel with you. Otherwise, put a lid on it. Also, Scott Norwood.

Posted by: horace1 | February 9, 2010 3:37 PM | Report abuse

This was the stupidest thing I have ever read. I was starving the other night when the pizza delivery man took a long time to come. Oops, I'm sorry. I probably shouldn't have said starving since I probably didn't exactly meet the definition of the word.

Posted by: davidupbin | February 9, 2010 3:41 PM | Report abuse

I was out trying to save the Cyprus trees (not really sure of the name, you know, the tall thin soft evergreens) the night of the storm. I report to you that it was blizzard conditions and more. The freakin lightning was flashing blue light and visibility was practically zero. My hands were frozen solid from being out there 20 minutes. The cold doesn't usually bother me that much, and I never wear gloves. BLIZZARD (at least for a little while)

Posted by: johng1 | February 9, 2010 3:42 PM | Report abuse

Again with the snow arrogance of these writers. The Post editors need to nip this and red line all these mindless "you don't know snow like I know snow" Go back to upstate and dear god try to not be so condescending.

Posted by: dcperspective | February 9, 2010 3:46 PM | Report abuse

Just what you would expect from someone who probably doesn't see anything wrong with putting a sweater on a dog. Stupid yankee.

Posted by: hisroc | February 9, 2010 3:52 PM | Report abuse

"Since the first snowflake dropped on Friday afternoon, I’ve been biting my tongue. I’m from upstate New York -- Albany and Buffalo, to be specific -- and I know we can be a tiresome lot when it comes to winter weather"

The author should have stop here- yes the article was tiresome.

Posted by: stitchdad | February 9, 2010 3:54 PM | Report abuse

I couldn't agree more.

You are tiresome.

BTW, this is from the National Weather Service's latest forecast for Montg. County:

"WINDS WILL BECOME NORTHWEST WEDNESDAY AND INCREASE TO 20 TO 30 MPH WITH GUSTS OVER 45 MPH. BLOWING AND DRIFTING SNOW WEDNESDAY WILL REDUCE VISIBILITIES BELOW ONE HALF MILE AT TIMES...CREATING NEAR BLIZZARD CONDITIONS."

Posted by: steve20912 | February 9, 2010 4:00 PM | Report abuse

As a fellow WNY'er I have to agree that this was not a blizzard. But then again when the traffic volume is 10X what you find in WNY, kids go to school at times 20+ miles from home, conditions get exacerbated rather quickly down here. And I'll be kind and say nothing about the snow driving skills here.

Posted by: Buflonian | February 9, 2010 4:03 PM | Report abuse

I'll defend you, Armao. I, too, grew up in the 'snow belt'- Ohio. Its always annoyed me when people lose their minds because its going to snow (and in the nearly 20 years I've been here, its snowed every winter). It once took me 2 hours to get home instead of 20 minutes due to no more than an inch of snow on the ground. While this was certainly a LOT of snow, at no time did it appear to be a 'blizzard' (as was the case in 96 and 03). As I told my mom-it just kept snowing for more than 24 hours.

Posted by: 39aka94 | February 9, 2010 4:06 PM | Report abuse

I've lived in northern New England for over 30 years and have seen only one true blizzard. The Valentine's Day Blizzard in 2008. 30 inches of snow, howling winds and below zero temperatures (real temps. not windchill). You couldn't drive because of whiteout conditions. It was really scary.

Posted by: newcar | February 9, 2010 4:09 PM | Report abuse

I am from the snow belt, too. I try not to bore people with pointless commentary like this. We live in a major urban area that, because of its dense population, is easily disrupted by severe weather events. I dare say, this is not Albany or Buffalo.

Posted by: w_schulz1 | February 9, 2010 4:12 PM | Report abuse


Let me apologize for this writer if he was truly from my town he would have sympathy for the dc area, (even if it wasn't a blizzard) and be a bit more helpful. for example, most cars these days have anti lock brakes that you don't pump.

I remember the blizzard of '77 also and it really wasn't the amount of snow but the winds that gave it the definition of a blizzard

Posted by: nall92 | February 9, 2010 4:16 PM | Report abuse

I agree that there was too much usage of the word blizzard, but what I really get tired of is, "Well, I'm from NY and we..blah blah blah" A friend of mine from Garret County, known for their snowfall outside of the great state of NY, stated that on Sunday they were going to walk out 3 miles to a friends house even though the roads hadn't been plowed. After 200 feet of walking in 30 inches, they ate their words and walked home to their nice warm house. Yep. They're always tougher someplace else!

Posted by: jrussell1 | February 9, 2010 4:23 PM | Report abuse

How is this partisan? I feel that the left, right, and center can all agree that this post is pointless.

Posted by: dkp01 | February 9, 2010 4:25 PM | Report abuse

I love the little give and take. WDC is semi-parallyzed by weather that is taken in stride in Minneapolis or Chicago...or Buffalo. But with 5000 media people in WDC - OMG, the world must be ending if the next story isn't more over the top than the last.
And Buffalo might whimper a bit if they had WDC summer weather for six weeks.

Posted by: j_donaldson1 | February 9, 2010 4:27 PM | Report abuse

I agree that there was too much usage of the word blizzard, but what I really get tired of is, "Well, I'm from NY and we..blah blah blah" A friend of mine from Garret County, known for their snowfall outside of the great state of NY, stated that on Sunday they were going to walk out 3 miles to a friends house even though the roads hadn't been plowed. After 200 feet of walking in 30 inches, they ate their words and walked home to their nice warm house. Yep. They're always tougher someplace else!

*****

well now your friend must have had a moment! i mean come on, walking 3 miles? probabaly to much coffee :)

just enjoy your days off and have fun in the snow! I'm actually kinda jealous

Posted by: nall92 | February 9, 2010 4:27 PM | Report abuse

Thank you, Jo-Ann. I, too, was bothered by the use of the word "blizzard," for the same reasons. And I grew up here. I'm guessing that if you were still on Metro it might not have been used quite so freely!

Posted by: ex-journo | February 9, 2010 4:29 PM | Report abuse

I love the little give and take. WDC is semi-parallyzed by weather that is taken in stride in Minneapolis or Chicago...or Buffalo. But with 5000 media people in WDC - OMG, the world must be ending if the next story isn't more over the top than the last.
And Buffalo might whimper a bit if they had WDC summer weather for six weeks.

****

oh there is no might about it! i'm a heat wimp and freely admit it! LOL

Posted by: nall92 | February 9, 2010 4:36 PM | Report abuse

Ah - the "one-upper." Everyone's favorite party guest...

Posted by: Goombay | February 9, 2010 4:50 PM | Report abuse

Ah - the "one-upper." Everyone's favorite party guest...

****

thank you

Posted by: nall92 | February 9, 2010 4:52 PM | Report abuse

Idiot, the weather forecasters said we would have blizzard conditions at times, we didn't end up with that, no high winds, no blinding snowfall. Big f'ing deal. They say tonight we will have same conditions, we will see how it goes.

Lastly, having lived in Alaska and other snowy places I know what a blizzard is, I don't need some moron to tell me, nor to disparage snow driving skills of people who only see snow a couple of times a year. People who almost never drive in snow like we've had twice this winter.

The worst drivers here think they do know how to drive in it and cause accidents with their impatience for the folks who had to drive and are doing their best to be careful. If you happen upon one of these slow moving drivers, try not to pass them since you may end up in a snowbank when your lane runs out unexpectedly. I just saw that happen btw, I thought the guy trying to pass got what he deserved, luckily he didn't swerve into the car next to him so only he paid for his a**hattery.

Posted by: datdamwuf2 | February 9, 2010 4:54 PM | Report abuse

people are snippy today, can't we just have some friendly snow talk/banter?

Posted by: nall92 | February 9, 2010 4:56 PM | Report abuse

"My betting is that as bad as people thought the so-called “snowmaggdeon” was, it wasn’t really a blizzard."

Why bet? Do 5 minutes of research. From wikipedia (which is correct in this case):

"A blizzard is a severe storm condition characterized by low temperatures, strong winds, and heavy snow. By definition, the difference between blizzard and a snowstorm is the strength of the wind."

So yes, significant portions of the DC area had blizzard conditions Friday night into Saturday.

If you had any questions, you could have sent email the Capital Weather Gang right here in the same newspaper as you and they would have told you definitively. Or call the National Weather Service. Whining how the weather is rougher in Buffalo... what does that prove?

Did you run out of things to write about? Frankly, it would be more fun to discuss your baby sitting problems again.

Posted by: Ombudsman1 | February 9, 2010 4:57 PM | Report abuse

The Post seems to have an endless supply of inane scribblers despite losing money. Weymouth seems even more clueless than her uncle. If there's been blizzard hype, the Post has been a big part of it--practical info has tended to be buried or ignored (no mention of postal service til today). As for whether this was a blizzard--1 to 2 feet of snow is a blizzard. I'm from the snowbelt E of Cleveland and this clown should be out shoveling the stuff rather than being paid to write sill twaddle like this.

Posted by: thebuckguy | February 9, 2010 5:03 PM | Report abuse

What is strange is that in the capital of Canada, Ottawa, there is virtually no snow at all right now. And they can have blizzards...

Posted by: tom_broen | February 9, 2010 5:20 PM | Report abuse

Jo-Ann, would you like a cookie?

Posted by: cookie714 | February 9, 2010 5:25 PM | Report abuse

Let me ask a simple question. Since Buffalo, Watertown and other upstate NY towns off Lake Ontario are so notoriously snowy and windy in the winter, why live there?

Anyone (such as yourself) who has emigrated from those snowy iceboxes to points south, such as DC, has no reason for disparaging the local inhabitants when they experience a taste of what that emigre grew up with. Obviously there is something positive in this area that led you to relocate here.

If you want to assert your snow superiority, head back to the old homestead in the winter and help your old neighbors shovel out.

By the way Ms. Armao, I am a true DC area native. We typically get snow with a high liquid content, along with occasional ice and sleet storms that create slippery and treacherous road conditions that are not easy to drive in. Snow depths become irrelevant. Does upstate NY contend with that? This last snow was so wet that my pipestem neighbor's snow blower clogged and he ended up shoveling. This kind of snow doesn't compact like the fluffy stuff. He and I spent three days shoveling ourselves out. As a result, I'm tired.

Thus ends the rant.

Posted by: MillPond2 | February 9, 2010 5:40 PM | Report abuse

Another stupid lib who moved here from upstate new york where people are so much 'smarter'. If buffalo is so great, why are they all unemployed and liberal? Every jurisdiction purchases snow equipment based on a 'normal' snowfall. FYI to the yankees that have infiltrated the area, buffalo gets more snow in a 'normal' winter than Balto/DC does so they have more plows and more people purchase 4x4 vehicles. There are most likely more people here who own motorcycles so let's talk about the idiots in buffalo who are horrible at riding bikes. Most of the vehicles I've seen stuck in the snow have yankee plates (New Jersey mostly). God Bless Dixie.

Posted by: oldno7 | February 9, 2010 5:41 PM | Report abuse

Sitting in Phoenix as I read this, it seems like a rather silly thing to argue about.

Posted by: wizard2 | February 9, 2010 5:47 PM | Report abuse

I was born and raised in DC. I, too, have been telling folks this was no blizzard. A blizzard is marked by high winds! Friday and Saturday's snow did not have the winds of a blizzard!

Posted by: independentwun | February 9, 2010 5:50 PM | Report abuse

Gotta hand it to those Yanks. The get blizzards, think barbecue comes from a crock pot, and make cornbread with yellow corn meal and sugar. No wonder they're so dour.

Posted by: douglaslbarber | February 9, 2010 5:53 PM | Report abuse

wizard2: I'll send you airfare money to come to DC and help me shovel this next round. When we're done, you can explain to me how silly this all is.

By chance, are you the anti-Armao?

Posted by: MillPond2 | February 9, 2010 5:56 PM | Report abuse

You are so right: This was one heck of a snow storm, but it was NOT a blizzard. In fact, it was weirdly worse than those wind-driven, high-drifting screamers that are called blizzards. It was one heck of a lot of snow... but a heck of a lot of WET snow!

I wasn't in Buffalo for the big one (my cousins were), but I lived through a bunch of big-time snows in NJ... and we could NOT make snowmen or have fights with the drifting, shifting, wind-driven white stuff of a true blizzard.

So, it's NOT a blizzard, but it is a whole other "hog", and a very viscious hog at that... trees broken, power down, (like it was sleet) and waay too much snow for the blowers (like it was UpState).

We are UNIQUE and so is our weather.... we really don't need to compete. Just survive.

dr Mac

Posted by: Resident3 | February 9, 2010 6:00 PM | Report abuse

I agree, the weekend snow was certainly not a blizzard. People in the DC area tend to freak out when it snows more than an inch.

Posted by: smc91 | February 9, 2010 6:17 PM | Report abuse

" Let me ask a simple question. Since Buffalo, Watertown and other upstate NY towns off Lake Ontario are so notoriously snowy and windy in the winter, why live there?"

Well, some of us didn't really have a choice, being under 18 and all.

Doesn't change the fact that you all don't handle snow that well. Don't be so damn sensitive. Every region has a kind of twisted pride in the burdens they have to bear.

I promise that next time you care to venture up to upstate NY in the summer, you'd be saying the exact same kind of thing with respect to us complaining about our relatively mild heat and humidity, or when we whine about traffic being backed up a whole 5 minutes at the one stoplight in town.

Posted by: chapoutier | February 9, 2010 6:20 PM | Report abuse

chapoutier: While this may be considered a shallow comment, parents make the decision concerning where to live - kids don't have the choice anyway.

Personally, I have no desire to go to upstate NY in the summer and berate the local population for complaining about unusual heat and humidity. That's their prerogative if they choose to do so - no different from the locals here venting frustration over an abnormal winter.

I am definitely through ranting. I need to save my energy for tomorrow's shoveling.

Posted by: MillPond2 | February 9, 2010 6:48 PM | Report abuse

" I am definitely through ranting. I need to save my energy for tomorrow's shoveling."

Remember to use the knees and not the back.

Posted by: chapoutier | February 9, 2010 6:57 PM | Report abuse

Uhh -- maybe people were freaking out about the blizzard because the National Weather Service issued a BLIZZARD WARNING? (not shouting, just copying the NWS writing style...)

You would think that if anyone knows what a blizzard is, the National Weather Service would.

Posted by: stuckman | February 9, 2010 7:00 PM | Report abuse

Okay, you know an article is bad when its own author calls it tiresome...TWICE! It may not have fit the textbook definition of blizzard, but Snowmaggedon sure did suck. But not as bad as the Bills do. Horace1, did you have to mention Scott Norwood? That was a low blow. Funny as hell, but a low blow.

Posted by: rcupps | February 9, 2010 7:08 PM | Report abuse

Another Upstater chiming in. I live between Syracuse, home of the golden snowball, and Rochester, no piker in wintry weather.

It's clearly a combination of media hype - THE BLIZZARD IS COMING, THE BLIZZARD IS COMING! - and a little more wet snow than usual. Big whoop. Actually for the last decade or so we've had much milder and less snowy winters up here, so it's no surprise to us when points south get clobbered occasionally. Don't know if that's the jet stream changing course or El Nino or what. I'll leave that to the meteorologists. Anyway, enjoy the challenge - and remember this cold come July and August when you're sweltering, and we're not.

Posted by: scottiemac52 | February 9, 2010 7:24 PM | Report abuse

BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD BLIZZARD

I'll call it whatever I want.

What's it to you? Afraid someone is stealing your snow martyr crown?

Posted by: solsticebelle | February 9, 2010 7:43 PM | Report abuse

" What's it to you? Afraid someone is stealing your snow martyr crown?"


The point is that we have actually earned it.

Think of how annoyed you would be if folks in NY-23 tried to steal DC's "No Representation" martyr crown by complaining that we didn't have a representative in Congress between September 21 and November 6 last year.

Posted by: chapoutier | February 9, 2010 7:54 PM | Report abuse

I grew up on the upper penninsula of michigan and have seen many "blizzard-like conditions," but never an actual blizzard. Basically, if you can still see across the street, it is not a blizzard. Isn't it enough that it is record snow?

Posted by: ama1 | February 9, 2010 7:55 PM | Report abuse

Thank God. As a native Chicagoan, I share in your absolute exhaustion with DC area residents and their histrionics in the face of inclement weather.

Now quick area residents - get defensive and tell me how much you don't want me here paying more taxes than the vast majority of you!

Posted by: dsk36 | February 9, 2010 7:56 PM | Report abuse

I arrived in Geneva several weeks ago a few hours after a 3" (8cm) snowfall. Paralyzed the airport and public transit. This was in Switzerland. Where it snows. Frequently.

Posted by: maus92 | February 9, 2010 7:59 PM | Report abuse

"I arrived in Geneva several weeks ago a few hours after a 3" (8cm) snowfall. Paralyzed the airport and public transit. This was in Switzerland. Where it snows. Frequently."

That is only because they refused to decide whether or not to plow the snow or shovel it.

Posted by: chapoutier | February 9, 2010 8:01 PM | Report abuse

Snow is cool
For you must be a fool.
Shovel away my friend
N you shall get meatier arms.
Let us carve some steps…
O where o where?
In the mounds of snow, egghead.
Did you not shovel just a day ago?
Where will you gob the graupel now, my dear?
Right! Behind the great wall ‘a crystal
I mushroomed, a day ago.

Posted by: ffarooq84 | February 9, 2010 8:02 PM | Report abuse

"Think of how annoyed you would be if folks in NY-23 tried to steal DC's "No Representation" martyr crown by complaining that we didn't have a representative in Congress between September 21 and November 6 last year.

Posted by: chapoutier | February 9, 2010 7:54 PM | Report abuse "

What a bizarre, non sequiter-ish segue. But don't put words in my mouth because that wouldn't annoy me at all.

However, what does annoy me is that when you DID get a representative, that representative had the innate power to bring to a screeching halt any DC law they may not like.

So for you to even compare the two situations - much less compare DC's second class status to a WEATHER condition - is asinine.

Oh, and I don't even live in DC.

Posted by: solsticebelle | February 9, 2010 8:15 PM | Report abuse

solsticebelle, thanks for sticking up for us DC'ers!

The rest of you NY whiners get lost.

BLLLIZZAARRDD!!

Posted by: johng1 | February 9, 2010 8:24 PM | Report abuse

Oh poor poor solsticebelle. Wouldn't all the energy you are wasting on righteous indignation over someone pointing out the FACT that Snowmageddon would barely register as "pretty bad" in upstate be better spent scurrying like a scared little mouse to Whole Foods to stock up on milk and toilet paper?

Posted by: chapoutier | February 9, 2010 8:26 PM | Report abuse

Chatpoutier: My back is just fine. I always bend the knees to avoid stress on the back, plus I do shoulder and leg stretches before and after shoveling. But thanks for the tip.

Posted by: MillPond2 | February 9, 2010 8:28 PM | Report abuse

I'm from Michigan. So I'm used to snow.

Tbis is a semi-southern state that doesn't normally get this much snow so they don't have the equipment, etc. to deal with it. But I've been here 4 years and Personally, I am impressed by the speed in which the streets were cleared.

Why don't you move back to NY and go for a long walk in the snow. You'll be happier

Posted by: seriouslywondering | February 9, 2010 8:29 PM | Report abuse

no chappie, we are smart enough to play it up every time and get a few well earned days off (while you sucker martyrs trudge off to work in the blinding snow). Ahhh ha ha

Posted by: johng1 | February 9, 2010 8:29 PM | Report abuse

And your inability, either through genuine ignorance or disingenuity, to recognize the aptness of my analogy does not make it asinine.

Posted by: chapoutier | February 9, 2010 8:33 PM | Report abuse

"In the United States, the National Weather Service defines a blizzard as sustained winds or frequent gusts reaching or exceeding 35 mph (56 km/h) which lead to blowing snow and cause visibilities of ¼ mile (or 400 m) or less, lasting for at least 3 hours."
I also don;t think we had a blizzard and was shocked that the Washington Post used the word. (I expect lies for FOX so was not surprised that they called it a blizzard).
And Ombudsman1 I did ask the CWG they chose not to answer.

Posted by: mmad2 | February 9, 2010 8:35 PM | Report abuse

Pleaseeeeeeeeeee, its a Blizzard if you are from texas, my kids told me its snowing so hard right now you cannot see outside!!!!!!!

Next time your in Texas do not complain about the weather in July!!

Posted by: honeybee1 | February 9, 2010 8:38 PM | Report abuse

Blizzard? Not even close. Journalism is a fancy word for unintelligent headline writers.

Posted by: therev1 | February 9, 2010 8:41 PM | Report abuse

Is the word "Yanks" or "yankee" still used? I thought that was just from my history books. I mean seriously, its 2010. Get over it.

Posted by: jgirl1377 | February 9, 2010 8:45 PM | Report abuse

As a parting thought, if folks in and around DC don't want people from snowier regions mocking the fact that they can't deal with real snow the once every 7 years they actually get it, maybe they should start acting like they weren't total idiots in dealing with it.

If you want to earn some snow cred, you would do well to start by actually removing all the snow from your car before you take off. That includes the roof. I don't know how many times I have seen large chunks of snow fly off the back of an SUV into an oncoming vehicle.

Posted by: chapoutier | February 9, 2010 9:09 PM | Report abuse

for once, Jo-Ann didn't blame something on the "toxic" all-powerful teacher unions.

Posted by: edlharris | February 9, 2010 9:24 PM | Report abuse

New York's deepest snow depth is currently 18" http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/snow-and-ice/recent.php?period=c®ion=30&submitted=Submit

Maryland's deepest snow depth is currently 36"
http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/snow-and-ice/recent.php?period=c®ion=18&submitted=Submit

Posted by: chesapeaketerp | February 9, 2010 9:54 PM | Report abuse

"New York's deepest snow depth is currently 18" "

Your point? Come back to me once any place in Maryland starts averaging 100 to 150 inches a year, as is the case for the vast majority of Western and Northern New York, or gets 84 inches in one day, as my hometown did.

Posted by: chapoutier | February 9, 2010 10:01 PM | Report abuse

Geez, why all the angry comments about this article? She only said that, according to the NWS definition, it wasn't a blizzard. Even the NWS can't confirm that it was a blizzard. And the fact that you had to shovel a lot, or you had to walk to the Blockbuster, or you had to put another blanket on because you lost power does not make it so.

The next time it gets really, really windy, will you call it a hurricane? Of course not, because weather events like hurricanes and blizzards have specific definitions.

Having lived in Washington and Buffalo (as well as Vermont, Iowa and Wisconsin), I can tell you that nobody gets worked up into a senseless lather about snow more than the residents of the DC metro. I don't know if it's the media, or simply the general we-are-the-center-of-the-universe attitude of many DC area residents. I hate to burst your bubbles, but most of the people on the planet think you guys are being a bit silly. I mean, for crying out loud, who names their snow storms???

Yeah, you got a lot of snow. A ton of it. Now, shovel it get back to work.

Posted by: dgloo | February 9, 2010 10:21 PM | Report abuse

Well, see, it's like this. Those of us in the rest of the nation who have endured both blizzards and and heavy-snow non-blizzards are the same people who often feel persecuted, ignored, or devalued by Washington. We realize you've got a lot of snow; we know you aren't accustomed to dealing with it. We just really, really enjoy the thought that for once, it's you, not us, getting picked on.

Posted by: mamapanda | February 9, 2010 10:23 PM | Report abuse

dgloo,

DC folks have ALL sorts of problems with definitions.

As you have no doubt discovered if you have ever eaten what they try to pass off as a "buffalo wing" down here.

Posted by: chapoutier | February 9, 2010 10:30 PM | Report abuse

I note that Jo-Ann Armao has had a good run as an editor at the Post, and have no doubt that this reflects the combined merits of native talent, acquired skill and hard work. This isn't the *Mat-Su Valley Frontiersman* we're talking about.

As a columnist, though, she's an embarassment.

Posted by: douglaslbarber | February 9, 2010 10:40 PM | Report abuse

As one of the endless supply of ex-WNY'ers, I'll say this was a very legit snowstorm. Call it a blizzard or not, my back still hurts from all the shoveling. That said, this area still has a ways to go to catch up to an average snow in in the Buffalo area, particulary the southern suburbs. Buffalo doesn't always get the massive amounts in a short span but it does snow somewhat on a lot of days.

As others have mentioned as well, WNY will whine to the high heavens if it goes above 85 for more than a few days in a row in the summer.

We all have our burden to bear.

Some stories of our better storms...

http://www.forgottenbuffalo.com/forgottenbflofeatures/buffalosnow.html

Posted by: dcourtney50 | February 9, 2010 10:45 PM | Report abuse

A mere 20 to 30 inches in light winds and you rednecks want to call that a blizzard? What is all the talk of shovelling? Just let your dogs out and they will break trail for you. Then put on your snowshoes, get out to your plow truck and clear your road. Shouldn't take more than half an hour, then GO TO WORK! Get up an hour early if a big snow is forecast and you will be the first one there. That's what the rest of the country does, 'ceptin the flatlanders, of course. It would probably help if you put winter tires on your limos as well.

Northern Vermonter

Posted by: Dennis12 | February 10, 2010 12:44 AM | Report abuse

If you think that your hometown does it much better than DC, it probably does.

You can keep your snow superiority, just remember that between OJ Simpson and Terrell Owens, your team lost 4 straight superbowls.

Horace 1 said it best: "Scott Norwood"

Posted by: hatchlaw | February 10, 2010 1:33 AM | Report abuse

I'm from D.C, but I live in Maine. Its cold here (although we've had a mild winter). 30 inches is a lot of snow. It's a lot of snow in Maine. Its a lot of snow anywhere. Its especially a lot of snow in a city that averages about six inches a year.

Posted by: jfreedma | February 10, 2010 2:21 AM | Report abuse

In the USA we have a very liberal use of words like ""American" or "genocide." They mean just about what ever we want them to mean.

Few ever pay attention to the dictionary - that would be a limit that we might not want to obey.

Posted by: GaryEMasters | February 10, 2010 6:07 AM | Report abuse

I have a memory of when I was in my teens, trudging through snow taller than my waist, and the snow was coming down slicing sideways. (Not just blowing sideways like it does for every storm.)

So now, whenever I think of "blizzard," I think of when it snows sideways and feels like your being cut open and you want to lay down in the snow and die.

I've yet to experience sideways snow any other time in my life. It was horrible! (And that's coming from someone who loves snow.)

We lock our worst experiences into our memories, and our memories won't allow those experiences to be surpassed.

Posted by: foldingtime | February 10, 2010 6:47 AM | Report abuse

No, it wasn't a blizzard. YET! It may well become one today though.

All regions experience stress when facing unusual weather patterns. I'm sure Buffalo and Albany would be screaming "heat wave" if they faced the typical Washington summer heat and humidity too, even though it may not "technically" be one.

Posted by: gasmonkey | February 10, 2010 6:47 AM | Report abuse

I'm one of those Washingtonians who cannot stand listening to others pump up their low self esteems when it snows by mentioning that they are from some northern region that gets lots of snow and how what we get is nothing. Give me a break, it's all relative. By the way, my wife is from Buffalo and she cannot stand snow or cold weather. Further, I'm a Washingtonian who never stays indoors regardless of snow or ice; I can drive in anything and I'll bet I can drive as well as someone from Buffalo in the snow. Take your Upstate crap elsewhere.

Posted by: aztecterp | February 10, 2010 6:58 AM | Report abuse

Please do not pay attention to Mr. Armao. I lived through the Buffalo "Blizzard of '77" as a child. I don't remember being scared; but I do remember playing outside during the blizzard and having alot of fun.

Posted by: ginabw | February 10, 2010 7:33 AM | Report abuse

Please spare us your uppity baloney. This is a blizzard. For this region. Some of purposely don't live in uppity New York because of this white crap. We don't have the equipment because of the frequency of snow and amount. Take your tired backside and go back to Uppityville.

Posted by: rnmelendez | February 10, 2010 7:43 AM | Report abuse

So, when Ms. Armao got her degree in meteorology, the wind and snow we got last week did not meet the definition of that time of a blizzard. Tell that to the current crop of meteorologists on our local television channels. I know Doug Hill, on ABC7, gave the CURRENT scientific definition of a blizzard and showed that our storm met that definition. Once again, I guess, it's more convenient to use your own experience than "pointy-headed" academic learning to support your position!

Posted by: wyatt3 | February 10, 2010 7:52 AM | Report abuse

actually, as of yesterday, dc had more snow this winter than albany or buffalo. we were number 2 after syracuse and i believe we have passed them as of today (see list on dcist.com). so new yorkers need to stuff it about how they have much worse snow back home. because this year, they don't.

Posted by: southern2 | February 10, 2010 8:24 AM | Report abuse

As one who grew up in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, I agree with Armao that the last snowstorm was pretty impressive (at least for Washington), but definitely not a real blizzard. That said, however, what is going on right now (Wednesday AM) IS a real blizzard with lots of snow and high winds. Enjoy...

Posted by: james1939 | February 10, 2010 8:24 AM | Report abuse

I went to Syracuse and had three 200+ inch winters while I was there. (My God! That's worse than Buffalo!)

This storm was worse than anything I had seen since the Blizzard of '93 when SU got 45 inches and they had to collapse the Dome.

Funny thing about this story. She doesn't acknowledge the snow was at its worst (the blizzard part of it) OVERNIGHT WHEN SHE WAS ASLEEP! HOW COULD SHE WRITE THIS! We had thundersnow for 2+ hours overnight and got 32" total. I know. I WAS AWAKE!

She's so smart to tell us what a "real" blizzard is (when she was asleep) yet so dumb that she pisses off her readers so much that they will always remember she's the pompous ass who told us that 30" of snow is not a big deal.

Posted by: McGill34 | February 10, 2010 8:27 AM | Report abuse

I am from Nebraska. What bugs me is that when a snow storm hits the East Coast it is big news for days and days. We had a similar storm earlier this season, and it was on the national news for one day. We are now going on 5 days for the East Coast storm in the news.

Posted by: nilsmcconnell | February 10, 2010 8:31 AM | Report abuse

because a storm in Nebraska doesnt really effect the US/Global economy...on the east coast...the gears of the world slow down.

Do you really think people are concerned with Nebraska?

Posted by: SA-Town | February 10, 2010 8:34 AM | Report abuse

New Yorkers are lame. Se I'm originally from Siberia, and your NY winters pale in comparison to ours. So stop pretending you suffer anything that is all that bad, especially when it happened 40 years ago. On a side note, anyone get the impression that New Yorkers love their beloved state so much that they moved?

Posted by: permagrin | February 10, 2010 8:34 AM | Report abuse

I also agree....If you dont think this is real snow/blizzard, then go back where you from and enjoy real snow there...WE DONT WANT TO HEAR IT!!!

Posted by: SA-Town | February 10, 2010 8:35 AM | Report abuse

Wow.

Poor, poor, suffering Washingtonians.

Now I know this is the greatest, richest,
most powerful nation the world has ever seen.
I am fully confident that we can subdue Mother Nature and conquer global warming.
I am also so confident now that our military, which is supplied with as much money as all the other armies in the whole world, can subdue a terrible enemy who burns his own underwear in his fervor to destroy us ....

Posted by: menelyik | February 10, 2010 8:35 AM | Report abuse

By the way, NWS issued blizzard warning for PG, Anne Arundel and other counties lining the Bay and the Atlantic Ocean in Maryland. I guess NWS was wrong with their definition of the word as well. I guess you also forgot they are part of your readership.

Posted by: McGill34 | February 10, 2010 8:36 AM | Report abuse

"We are now going on 5 days for the East Coast storm in the news."

It must be pretty bad in NE when you sit around for 5 days watching East Coast news.

Posted by: permagrin | February 10, 2010 8:36 AM | Report abuse

Horrible snow is defined by the amount of snow removal equipment. In MN and the Great Plains, 30 inches would set them back a day or so, along the Gulf states at 8 inches, things would be at a stand still until it all melted, which in the case of Texas this past Christmas was about 5 days.

It is not like DC and the area up to Boston have never seen snow. It is nit-wits who believed that they did not need the snow removal equipment any more due to global warming so cut the budgets for it.

I also don't know if Grandparent Syndrome (aka, we had 100 ft snow banks, walked 10 miles in blinding snow with no coat, hat, or mittens...) is taking over my brain, but what passes for a blizzard these days would not even have gotten us off from school back in my day.

Posted by: skramsv | February 10, 2010 8:45 AM | Report abuse

Ironic that this was published when we actually ARE having a snow blizzard.

I love permagrin's post!

Armao seems to be missing the key point. Weather that is UNUSUAL for the specific area gets the attention. Of course a snow blizzard in Buffalo, for example, will not get as much press as a blizzard in WDC. The other point is that WDC has a high number of "transplants" from other areas who have never (or rarely) seen snow before. They compound our driving problems.

Heck, I was born in WDC and I haven't driven since Friday. My road isn't plowed, and I'm well-stocked, so there is no need to drive.

Armao should stick to editing.

Posted by: Whazzis | February 10, 2010 8:47 AM | Report abuse

I can no longer bite my tongue either...

It's spelled Snowmageddon! Does no one know how to spell Armageddon?! Just because it's a portmanteau doesn't mean you change the spelling.

I noticed you spelled it two different ways? Couldn't make up your mind? Or were you quoting some one who doesn't know how to spell? You know there are bracket rules to follow when some one you quote misspells a word.

Snowmageddon 2010 continues.

Posted by: gcohrs | February 10, 2010 8:56 AM | Report abuse

Why is Armao qualified to be on the WPost editorial board anyway? Whether it's dissing parents who are rightfully fighting bad school policies - or deciding what constitutes a real blizzard or not - this woman is nothing short of annoying and ill-informed. Please - get someone on the WPost editorial board worth reading. And, by they way, I'm from Michigan. This morning's storm IS a blizzard!

Posted by: abcxyz2 | February 10, 2010 9:00 AM | Report abuse

Sounds like my crazy old grandfather trying to tell us "they don't make snow storms like they used to!!!"

Posted by: Revcain777 | February 10, 2010 9:06 AM | Report abuse

I am so tired of snow snobs who constantly claim with heightened bravado that only they have experienced "real snow" and "real blizzards." Just don't bother adding this record breaking DC sequence of snow storms to your "snow resume" and your snow superiority experience will remain untarnished.

Posted by: EureRiver | February 10, 2010 9:07 AM | Report abuse

Every time I hear a New Yorker talking about "snow" I have to bite my tongue. They don't know what real snow is....not even some Canadians, for that matter. I grew up near the arctic circle and what you call "blizzard" we called flurries. When I lived in upstate NY we had picnics and barbecues in your so-called blizzards....with shorts on!

Posted by: kevkno | February 10, 2010 9:12 AM | Report abuse

really lady? really? how do you have a job?

i could give a rat's nether regions whether the NWS tech spec are met or not. this is an historic month of snowfall, don't act like it's "no big deal" if you're from upstate New York. my co-workers from Rochester and Buffalo both told me this is nuts. oh, and by the way- today it is technically a blizzard.

Posted by: Notorious_LMG | February 10, 2010 9:12 AM | Report abuse

There are a lot of people from that part of the country down here. How many Washingtonians live in freakin' Buffalo? That's what I thought - now go home if it's so great there.

Posted by: fleeciewool | February 10, 2010 9:16 AM | Report abuse

"As a parting thought, if folks in and around DC don't want people from snowier regions mocking the fact that they can't deal with real snow the once every 7 years they actually get it, maybe they should start acting like they weren't total idiots in dealing with it.

If you want to earn some snow cred, you would do well to start by actually removing all the snow from your car before you take off. That includes the roof. I don't know how many times I have seen large chunks of snow fly off the back of an SUV into an oncoming vehicle."

Posted by: chapoutier | February 9, 2010 9:09 PM | Report abuse

"New York's deepest snow depth is currently 18" "

Your point? Come back to me once any place in Maryland starts averaging 100 to 150 inches a year, as is the case for the vast majority of Western and Northern New York, or gets 84 inches in one day, as my hometown did."

Posted by: chapoutier | February 9, 2010 10:01 PM | Report abuse

==========================================

Nobody from down here cares about the 84 inches your hometown got that one time in history. Nor do we care about earning "snow cred", as you put it.

Stop pretending that this isn't a big deal. No matter how much a place like Buffalo might average in terms of yearly snowfall, the truth is that no populous place in the U.S. gets 2-3 feet of snow IN LESS THAN 24 HOURS. And when they do, it is considered a rare event.

So when the 6th-largest metro area in the country -- a place with high population density that averages a dusting most winters, except for high and/or outlying areas -- gets this much snow at once, then yes: it is in fact a big deal. Whether it is a blizzard or not, almost any city in the world would have trouble dealing with the sheer volume we got in such a short time.

To me, this isn't much different from when northern and western Europe experienced an abnormal summer heat wave that killed lots of people, particularly in Paris. During that event, did you sneer at Parisians' inability to keep cool? Did you suggest ways in which they could expand their 'heat cred'?

You should have limited your criticism to the use of the term "blizzard" instead of expanding it to a childish, petty and overblown critique of the bad-weather behavior of people who live in this area.

Posted by: jcabana | February 10, 2010 9:17 AM | Report abuse

last week's storm (26 inches) dumped FAR more snow in less than 48 hrs than Buffalo averages in the entire month of February (17.7 according to NOAA). LOL.

get off your high horse woman

Posted by: Notorious_LMG | February 10, 2010 9:17 AM | Report abuse

Very Good Point about the mis-use of Bizzard:

There is a real and important reason not to call a heavy snow storm a bizzard. Bizzards kill people, bad ones can kill you by getting you lost 20 feet from your house, and they also make driving impossible, not just difficult. The reason to only call real bizzards by this name is that if they predict a bizzard it means... Get the *uck inside well before it hits if you want to live.

BTW I have lived in New England for 7 years, and have never seen a Blizzard, or any thing that was really close.

Posted by: Muddy_Buddy_2000 | February 10, 2010 9:18 AM | Report abuse

A.) According to the NWS definition you posted above, it's now a blizzard.

B.) I try to cut some slack for Buffalo drivers who don't know they have anti-lock brake systems.

Posted by: ultima542000 | February 10, 2010 9:27 AM | Report abuse

"Since the first snowflake dropped on Friday afternoon, I’ve been biting my tongue."

Wait, if you're biting your tongue, then why did you write this article? Am I missing something here?

Unfortunately this "blizzard" poses a conundrum for a metropolitan area such as DC. Especially when an area gets back to back storms.

For example, I live near the Wilson Bridge south of Old Town. Prior to this recent front, I've seen dump trucks carrying snow cleared from Reagan and dumping them underneath the bridge.

Why? Because in an urban area like DC, where do you put the snow? For residents, you cannot dump snow from your sidewalk/driveways into the streets and vice versa. And it's not like there are plenty of drainage areas for melted snow to go to.

Plus, this region does not traditionally have these kinds of winter weather compared to say the New England states. Of course those regions will be better prepared -- it's because they've traditionally have these kinds of conditions for decades. DC metro area is a bit of an anomaly because these types of storms do not happen with any type of frequency. So how can states determine how much and what much they need to prepare for conditions like these? Unless the state governments are all 100% psychics, it's a gamble each year.

So for all the naysayers calling DC a bunch of "anti-winter namby-pansies", unless you can come up with a better idea with how DC Metro residents can handle the storm, I say "just start shoveling".

Posted by: chibipulse | February 10, 2010 9:35 AM | Report abuse

I find this kind of commentary very condescending and upsetting. I understand that "blizzard" is a technical term and that maybe these conditions haven't been met. I understand that the author feels like people don't have an adequate sympathy for her previous experience with winter.

I just don't understand why. Is her self of pride really threatened by the use of that word in this region? Does she seriously think that people here think that DC is as cold as upstate New York? People from around here (like I am) are not idiots. We use terms like that, in cases of severe weather, to discourage people who are not used to snow driving, and who are probably unprepared for Buffalo-style winter weather, from going out. To encourage businesses to allow liberal leave policies. We know that it's cold in Buffalo too, we get it. Maybe if the father and son killed last week had been seasoned cold-weather types from Buffalo, then they'd have known how to handle the situation better and would still be safe. But I suspect that if this storm had been described as 'a typical Buffalo dusting' (which I'm guessing 30 inches is), then even more people would have been injured or killed.

I can't be sure, but I have to suppose this post was written before the National Weather Service said in a special statement (which I found on the Capital Weather Gang) that reads "EXTREMELY DANGEROUS WINTER WEATHER CONDITIONS...LIFE THREATENING BLIZZARD CONDITIONS HAVE DEVELOPED...NUMEROUS WIND GUSTS OVER 40 MPH HAVE BEEN OBSERVED...YOU CAN QUICKLY BECOME DISORIENTED IN DRIVEN WIND AND SNOW". I'm glad the National Weather Service has their concern in the right place: with the safety of our community, rather than with their own sense of superiority.

Posted by: cy4punk | February 10, 2010 9:38 AM | Report abuse

As a veteran of the Buffalo blizzard of 1977, first let me say that it was one of the most terrifying events of my life.

If you stepped outside, you stood a good chance of dying (yes, people actually died outside and snowed into their cars right on the streets in an urban area.)

That winter it started snowing on about October 20th and continued almost every day. By the time the blizzard hit, there was already about 3 feet of snow on the ground. (The storm was in early Feb of 1977).

That being said, after the blizzard (which lasted about 3 days BTW), the media did its homework and asked all the old-timers what they thought. They all agreed this was the worst ever.

For DC, Buffalo or anyplace, getting 20" of snow in one day is very bad. The cutesy names, however, do merit a dig or two.

Posted by: stivgdgy | February 10, 2010 9:48 AM | Report abuse

To this:

Is the word "Yanks" or "yankee" still used? I thought that was just from my history books. I mean seriously, its 2010. Get over it.

Posted by: jgirl1377

Have you EVER been out of the house? Yankee is used frenquently. Seriously, what a silly thing to say. Go somewhere new. Check it out. Believe me, people do inhabit VA, NC, SC, GA, AL, MS, FL, TN, KY. It does exist. Being so flipped out about a world that may differ from yours makes you kinda like the author of this post. Yes, there are people different than you and situations different than yours. It's reality and not so scary. You sound as ridiculous as the person who said there was a strong chance of dying if you left the house during the Blizzard of '77.

Posted by: Urnesto | February 10, 2010 10:21 AM | Report abuse

Funny... The Post took down direct access to this blog from the homepage. You can't find unless you search for it (or click on Ruth Marcus's link). Gotta love it.

Posted by: McGill34 | February 10, 2010 10:22 AM | Report abuse

To reiterate what so many intelligent reasonable people have written so far, why did the writer realize that her blabber would be construed as "tiresome," yet continue on her rant about how this is NOT a blizzard.

Why is winter weather always a competition to determine who is the "real man" when it comes to snowfall? Even the President weighed in last year, yet even he officially named this storm.

Please, please, please go back to upstate New York where you will be better understood and won't have to deal with us Washingtonians. You'll be better off without us. And we'll be much happier with one less cold weather blow hard lecturing us on what constitutes a real snowstorm. Please. Go home.

Posted by: BillyBob7 | February 10, 2010 10:39 AM | Report abuse

Using the definition supplied by Ms. Armao, and available http://forecast.weather.gov/glossary.php?word=BLIZZARD at the NWS web site, the first snowfall qualified as a blizzard (not one as bad as the '77 one in Buffalo, mind you, but a blizzard nonetheless):

"Blizzard (abbrev. BLZD)- A blizzard means that the following conditions are expected to prevail for a period of 3 hours or longer:

"Sustained wind or frequent gusts to 35 miles an hour or greater; and considerable falling and/or blowing snow (i.e., reducing visibility frequently to less than ¼ mile)."

So, if you have "frequent gusts" that reach 35 mph for three hours and "considerable falling and/or blowing snow" that "frequently" reduces visibility to less than 440 yards (about four a half football fields), you've got a blizzard.

I would submit that Friday night's storm met those conditions, just as the storm raging outside meets them.

As for who wins the "severe weather" crown, really, who cares? But since we're on the subject, I lived here during Hurricane Agnes in 1972, when Rock Creek swelled above its bridges, the Ice Storm of '96 and Hurricane Isabel a few years back, when we lost power for 10 days or so.

Yeah, I know, nothin like Buflo.

Posted by: steve20912 | February 10, 2010 10:54 AM | Report abuse

I don't understand why some of you don't believe that people died during Buffalo's blizzard of '77. Buffalo had sustained blizzard grade winds for the first 25 hours of the storm, including 70 mph gusts. It was frozen hell, with drifts of over two stories. 27 people died. Uronically, about 7" of new snow fell. The rest was blown off a frozen lake (3 feet worth) deposited on the city and packed like concrete by the constant winds. Grown men could easily walk atop all the drifts without sinking in. Blizzard of '85 was a walk in the park by comparison.

Yes, Washington got a lot of snow, and now has had more snow in a week than Buffalo has all winter, but don't belittle other storms just because you got a lot at once in an area that usually doesn't.

Posted by: Bflogal | February 10, 2010 11:05 AM | Report abuse

To Urnesto.

Clearly you missed my point. I am well aware that it is still used. Though earlier in these postings someone used it as a derogatory term. That is my point. People should be nicer to each other. I have traveled to almost every state, and I have traveled all over the world. I strongly believe in diversity and stating our own opinions and thoughts, but I draw the line when people are just outright mean. In fact, that's why I feel that so many of these posts are just so angry. I am amazed at all these posts I read. It actually makes me kind of sad.

Posted by: jgirl1377 | February 10, 2010 11:14 AM | Report abuse

Excuse me while I laugh at the notion of a Washingtonian accusing anyone from another area of being condescending.

Okay, now that that is out of the way...

We point out one indisputable fact:

Washington, on a personal and governmental level suck at dealing with snow. Of course, the population density and unfamiliarity with such conditions exacerbate the situation. But that is neither the entire story nor does it change the bottom line conclusion.

And yes, these particular storms are significant and would be disruptive just about anywhere. But don't kid yourselves into thinking that it takes nearly this amount of snow to send the entire region into predictable chaos and, as another poster put it, histrionics. Anything over 2 inches seems to have the same effect.

Sorry, but that is fact. You don't deal with a LOT of snow particularly well, nor do you deal with ANY snow particularly well. I apologize for any hut feelings or wounded civic pride. But really, what is most interesting is the fact that people around here are completely incapable of dealing with any sort of criticism. I certainly never hear a lack of criticism, from DCers or others about upstate New York or just about any other part of the country, for that matter. And you know what? Often times they are right. Relative lack of jobs, culture, diversity, and, shall we say, general excitement. Which is why, on the whole I much prefer DC. But good god, get over yourself, suck it up and be able to take some relatively benign criticism in stride.

Posted by: chapoutier | February 10, 2010 11:20 AM | Report abuse

"Just what you would expect from someone who probably doesn't see anything wrong with putting a sweater on a dog. Stupid yankee."

No, no, no. Yankees don't put sweaters on dogs . . . although she IS from New York, so . . . .

Moronic opinion. I guess there isn't anything newsworthy, eh?

Jo-Ann, time to go re-read that quote about "Better to be thought a fool . . . ."

Posted by: js84 | February 10, 2010 11:47 AM | Report abuse

You're so dishonest in your usual editorials that you've lost all credibility with me. I don't even believe what you say about blizzards in Buffalo.

Posted by: efavorite | February 10, 2010 2:51 PM | Report abuse

Oh no - not another NY er telling us what real snow is - how about the really old addage about pumping the brakes - giving out false info is dangerous - pumping brakes - please don't do this unless you have a very real old vehicle!!

Posted by: Cragito | February 10, 2010 4:05 PM | Report abuse

Jo-Ann - Please research your advise about pumping brakes - this can cause you to have to take your car to the dealer for repairs - brakes are currently pumped by the computer much faster and more effeciently than you can. so much for NY'ers knowning all about snow.!!!

Posted by: Cragito | February 10, 2010 4:09 PM | Report abuse

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