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Small GOP victory in Hawaii

"It's a significant win for us," Republican National Committee Chairman Michael Steele said of the GOP's capture of a House seat from Hawaii in a special election. And, sure, yes, after compiling a 0-11 record in special elections since May 2008, Steele is right, in a way. The seat has been held by a Democrat for nearly 20 years. And it is in Honolulu, President Obama's birthplace, which Steele acknowledged is, indeed, the case. But that's the limit of "significant." The Democrats stand a good chance of taking that seat back in six short months.

Andrew Romano at Newsweek beat me to the punch yesterday when he pointed out some key facts in the HI-1 race, which was necessitated by Democrat Neil Abercrombie's decision to resign in order to run for governor. There were two candidates who split the Democratic vote. Combined, Colleen Hanabusa and former Rep. Ed Case snagged 58.4 percent of the vote. The man who won, Charles Djou, mustered just 30.8 39.7 percent. Next, Djou will have to run again in November for a full two-year term. Unlike the crowded field that eased his entre to Capitol Hill, Djou will face just one Democrat in that race. Considering the fact that Obama won his birthplace district with 70 percent of the vote in 2008, Djou better stock up on as many Congressional mementos as possible. He might not be there long.

By Jonathan Capehart  | May 24, 2010; 6:30 AM ET
Categories:  Capehart  | Tags:  Jonathan Capehart  
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Comments

I encourage you to look deeper into this story as it mirrors what is coming here to the mainland: it's about race. I lived there for several years and there is much aloha for tourists but the locals are very divided by race.
I just saw a commercial for a "black" radio show in the DC area who promises advertisers access to more black people that other shows- really? And the shock is Rand Paul?

Posted by: dcjayhawk2 | May 24, 2010 6:45 AM | Report abuse

capture of a House seat from Hawaii in a special election. And, sure, yes, after compiling a 0-11 record in special elections since May 2008, Steele is right, in a way. The seat has been held by a Democrat for nearly 20 years. And it is in Honolulu, President Obama's birthplace, which Steele

Funny how this is a small victory, yet the Penn. victory by a democrat (Murtha's old seat) was a major victory.

Excuses will start pouring in by the hundred weight from the LIBERAL MSM after each and every loss by the democrats. Of course don't acknowledge the wins in NJ,Va, Mass, Kentucky etc. they are just passing flukes, right? NOT!

Posted by: frankn1 | May 24, 2010 8:27 AM | Report abuse

Actually there is significance in Djou's victory but it's not surprising Jonathan missed it because the victory came from a parting on the left and not a parting on the right.

Even though it was a traditional R vs. D race, this illustates the impact of third parties generally have in allowing a plurality candidate to win. In many recent cases that third person (generally a conservative or libertarian who siphons some of the center-right vote) has allowed a Democrat to win but in this case two Democrats who wouldn't stand down against each other (perhaps because neither was obviously out of it) allowed the GOP to win.

Actually, the PA-12 race was a big deal because the winner ran against Obama's agenda as a Democrat. That was the news angle used by the Democratic leadership and the media, wasn't it?

Wait, it wasn't? Somebody's missing a real news story then! We'll see if Critz votes like a DINO once he's sworn in.

Posted by: Michael_Swartz | May 24, 2010 11:22 AM | Report abuse

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